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First of many questions


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#1
MoMetal

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I've never built a computer before but I do so love to tinker... So I'm jumping in with both feet. Although before I start listing lists from newegg I need a couple of simple questions answered.

First, whats your take on a first timer installing OEM parts rather than retail, should I steer clear until I have a few rigs under my belt?

On operating systems, 32 bit/ 64 bit, what is my concern here?

And finally, how do I go about determining what voltage of power supply I should run with? Or do you find out the bare minimum but then buy as high as the wallet can afford?

Thanks for the input.

Matt
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#2
Neil Jones

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1) The parts are exactly the same. OEM means you get the device, a CD (if appropriate) and a plastic bag. Retail means you get fancy manuals, changeable bezels (if a CD unit), a CD and a shiny box that'll go in the bin anyway. Price wise there used to be a difference between Retail and OEM but these days the difference is next to nothing. Save the environment and buy OEM if you can.

2) 64-bit software is the future however a lot of older programs may not work under 64-bit software and 64-bit drivers may not be available for the hardware either. 32-bit software is more compatible however it only sees up to a certain amount of memory which may or may not be a concern for you.

3) Power supply - voltage wise, the bigger the better. However depending on the hardware you do install, particularly graphics cards, some hardware may require a certain amount of power coming down the various channels that make up the power - called the rails - in order to function properly. Also some brands are better than others. This is not an area to skimp on where possible because the units have the ability to upset the rest of the components, the cheaper units are known to take out the board with them when they die and if you should have an extended warranty on the board, it won't be covered.
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#3
MoMetal

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Thanks for the speedy reply :) Now, off to newegg to make the list of lists!
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