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Shell command


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#1
m2zt

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is their any tutorials for the shell command that tells you how to access and move the files??
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#2
Salient

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Are you looking for a way to move files around in the DOS SHELL? - The shell command itself hasn't been available as an external command in Windows OS's since Windows 95.

DOS is a shell - if this is what your looking for than use the Xcopy command.
Xcopy is a powerful version of the copy command with additional features and has the capability of moving files, directories, and even whole drives from one destination to another.

xcopy h:\*.* /a /e /k

The above command would copy everything located on the H drive to the drive you are currently on.

some variables:

XCOPY source [destination] [/A | /M] [/D[:date]] [/P] [/S [/E]] [/W] [/C] [/I] [/Q] [/F] [/L] [/H] [/R] [/T] [/U] [/K] [/N]

source = Specifies the file(s) to copy.
destination = Specifies the location and/or name of new files.

/A Copies files with the archive attribute set, doesn't change the attribute.
/M Copies files with the archive attribute set, turns off the archive attribute.
/D:date Copies files changed on or after the specified date. If no date is given, copies only those files whose source time is newer than the destination time.

/P Prompts you before creating each destination file.
/S Copies directories and sub directories except empty ones.
/E Copies directories and sub directories, including empty ones. Same as /S /E. May be used to modify /T.

/W Prompts you to press a key before copying.
/C Continues copying even if errors occur.
/I If destination does not exist and copying more than one file, assumes that destination must be a directory.

/Q Does not display file names while copying.
/F Displays full source and destination file names while copying.
/L Displays files that would be copied.
/H Copies hidden and system files also.
/R Overwrites read-only files.
/T Creates directory structure, but does not copy files. Does not include empty directories or sub directories. /T /E includes empty directories and sub directories

/U Updates the files that already exist in destination.
/K Copies attributes. Normal xcopy will reset read-only attributes.
/Y Overwrites existing files without prompting.
/-Y Prompts you before overwriting existing files.
/N Copy using the generated short names.
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#3
m2zt

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I found FSO

is their a way to not write the whole path name
like
kill "C:\t.txt"

or something like that
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#4
mpfeif101

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What are you trying to do, open another application with the shell command?
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#5
m2zt

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i am trying to make a little program that deletes adware

and yes i know their are free adware programs!!!
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#6
mpfeif101

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By filename, hash, or another way?
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#7
m2zt

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like

kill c:\something.exe

instead of the full pathname
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