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Geforce 9600GT 512MB.


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#1
Richenstony

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I just bought this card around a hour ago , and installed it 5 minutes ago .

My issue is , on my main game call of duty 2 I'm not getting a constant 125fps i would of least expected 200fps constant , Ive set the graphics as low as i can . Its on dx7 as well .

All the right drivers installed all the right power and all the right wires connected to the gpu.

Thanks Tony

28 processes running all which i need.

NVIDIA Control Panel set to "Let the 3D application decide.

Ran 3d mark , temps are fine .

Video drivers are the latest from the nivdia site.

Ive also reinstalled the game .

Its not as bad on other games mainly cal of duty 2 , but its my main game its all i play . Crysis runs extremely well on high settings .

Motherboard:
Gigabyte

Processor:
Genuine Intel® CPU 2140 @ 1.60GHz (2 CPUs) overclocked to 3.2ghz

Memory:
2046MB RAM

Hard Drive:
160 GB

Video Card:
NVIDIA GeForce 9600 GT

Monitor:
hp pavilion mx70

Sound Card:
Realtek HD Audio output

Speakers/Headphones:
Philips 5.1 Surround Sound

Operating System:
Windows XP Home Edition (5.1, Build 2600) Service Pack 2

Ive got dx9 and its been updated.

Ive also tried commands like /r_gpusync 0 , it locks the fps for around 2 minutes then it goes from 250 to 40 from 250 to 40 constantly .


Thanks for reading Tony .
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#2
Richenstony

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Bump.
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#3
Titan8990

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Are you aware that the human eye can not tell the difference between 60 FPS and 200 FPS? Are you aware of the Nvidia naming scheme?

x100-300 - Low end cards

x500-600 - Mid Range

x800 - Gaming/High End


In short, there is nothing wrong with FPS. If anything they are higher than expected....

Edited by Titan8990, 27 June 2008 - 01:49 AM.

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#4
Richenstony

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While, consciously, you won't really notice a difference, your brain will. NVIDIA put out a demo which ran something at 60FPS on one side of the screen and 30FPS on the other. If you only watched one or the other, they both looked fluid. But when watched side by side at the same time, you could definitely see a difference. The human eye doesn't process visual information in frames nor does the real world provide information to the eye in such a way.

The highest proven frame rate that the human eye can perceive is over 200FPS in a test of flashing images on a screen for 1/200th of a second. Every image was visible and identifiable by the viewers... exactly how subliminal advertising works. While a constant stream of images (full motion video for example) won't be as noticeable, it can be perceived by the human eye at far higher rates than 30-40FPS, and the brain can interpret the fluidity. You consciously won't really notice a difference unless it's next to something running slower (like seeing 120FPS next to 60FPS in a way like NVIDIA demonstrated).

prime example :

You cant shoot a moving enmey on less than 125 fps.....

If your fps constantly fluxuating from 250 to 40 fps , you will notice lag ... not just a little lag , baddd lag!! You character jaults forward constantly.

So yes there is a difference. :)
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#5
stettybet0

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I can't find the exact link at this time, but the average human eye can only process 72 FPS of full-motion video. Bright to dark (or dark to bright) contrast can be detected at up to 100 FPS in some cases, but unless you are watching a flashing screen this is irrelevant.

Yes, 30 FPS and 60 FPS will have a difference. Yes, 250 FPS and 40 FPS will have a difference. But as long as the FPS stays above approximately 72 FPS, you shouldn't notice anything.

If you couldn't shoot someone at less than 125 FPS, no one would play Crysis, Call of Duty 4, or any other modern shooter, as you could never shoot anyone.

Anyways, you could get some better FPS by switching to DX9 mode. The 9600GT and the latest drivers are designed to run DX10 and DX9, not DX7.
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#6
Titan8990

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And stetybett0 shows up with the exact FPS #.... Personally, I always run vsync which limits my FPS at around 60. I have found that many online games are starting to limit your max FPS anyways to prevent someone from gaining an advantage over their opponent

The 9600GT and the latest drivers are designed to run DX10 and DX9, not DX7.


I believe this is a typo as the game he is playing requires DX9.
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