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Computer crashes


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#1
porcupine

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I tried to boot up again in safe mode. I got to a screen filled with line after line of :
multi (0)disk(0)rdisk(0)parition(1)WINDOWS\system32\drivers\[various thing].sys

I had this screen last time I booted in safe mode, but it moved on. this time it was stuck there.

I tried to boot a second time in regular mode. I got the system restore. It had the same option of the latest restore point and I clicked next. There was a calendar and a message that said Aug. 2006. It is possible that the date and time on the computer is screwed up. That happened once and I fixed it. It happened a second time and I chose the option of it being fixed automatically and it didn't do it right. Again... as I took about 10 second to decide what to do, it crashed.
I guess at this point I have nothing to lose.

I have a questions. I was using a logitech mouse and keyboard. The mouse is wireless. It stopped working a couple days ago, and I fished out an old corded mouse that doesn't need a driver. Could this be the source of the trouble?

Should I try the restore point it's offering? I figure, I dn't have much to lose. and if I try again, should I try safe mode or not:?

Edited by porcupine, 11 July 2008 - 01:56 PM.

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#2
wannabe1

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Now that we're in a proper help forum, what kind of machine are we working on? Is is a brand name machine like a Dell or HP? If it is, what's the make and model number?

Do you have an XP installation cd?
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#3
porcupine

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Not a brand name. What do you mean by an installation card. For Windows? If so, Idoubt it.
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#4
wannabe1

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I meant the installation cd (compact disk) that you used to install Windows.
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#5
porcupine

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About a year ago i had to format the computer. Whatever the technician used, I don't have it.
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#6
wannabe1

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That's going to make things a little difficult.... :)

Let's start by checking your memory modules. This will require you to make a disk to boot the machine to a memory diagnostics tool. I'm assuming you have a cd/dvd burner on the machine you are using now. This first one will be pretty straight forward, simply create the disk using the instructions shown under the Quick Start Information on the download page. The short instruction would be to download the file, double click on it to start the creation application, and insert a blank cd-r into your cd drive.

Boot the broken machine using this disk. The memory diagnostics should begin automatically. Let this run for about an hour. If any test in any pass fails, we may be looking at a bad memory module.

I've got to step out for a little while, but will be back in about an hour...maybe a little more. If you run into a problem, just sit tight and I'll help with it when I return.

Windows Memory Diagnostics Tool
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#7
porcupine

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Hi. The computer I'm using to write to you doesn't have a burner. But even is I found a way to burn the disk and inserted into the cd drive of the broken computer, it generally crashes about 1 minute after it finishes booting. Would it be different if I was using the disk?

It's close to midnight local time so I guess we can pick this up tomorrow sometime.

Thanks, and bye for now.
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#8
wannabe1

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If it's a Windows problem, it will boot and run as long as you let it. If it's a memory module problem, it will still run until you stop it, but will show some tests as failing. If it's a problem with other hardware, such as the power supply, processor, or motherboard, it will crash as it has been. This will help us start to narrow the problem down a little.

Do you know someone with a burner that you could have burn this disk and another that I'd like to use?
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#9
porcupine

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Haven't yet found anyone to burn the disk for me. Made another attempt to use system restore, but crashed just before I got through the wizard. Tried to reboot twice again and nothing but black. It doesn't been either.

Not looking good, I'm afraid.
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#10
wannabe1

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We're going to need some disks to get back in to this machine. Your problem is a good example of why it's so important to make sure that you receive the operating system disk when you purchase a machine.

When you find someone to burn the disks for you, have them burn RC.ISO, as well. This is the Windows Recovery Console.

Download RC.iso and burn it to a cd as an ISO image. You may need a burning tool like ISO Recorder to do this...be sure to get the version for the operating system you'll be creating the disk on.

This disk must be burned as an ISO image. ISO Recorder, once installed, will add "Copy Image to CD" to the right click context menu. To burn an ISO image, right click on the file to be burned and choose the "Copy Image to CD" option from the menu to start the burning application...you can use the default settings to make the disk.

Can you boot into the BIOS Setup long enough to have a look at the CPU temperatures and the voltages being provided by the power supply?

I really suspect that you are either overheating or the power supply has gone bad. Bad RAM and a bad motherboard can also cause this, but are less common failures.
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#11
porcupine

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Hi,
I tried to find someone to burn a disk fr me, but with no success. :)
I made another attempt to do a system restore, but didn't finish before it crashed. Now it won't boot at all.

I'm going to take it into the shop tomorrow. I need to get the computer working as soon as possible for work.

Thanks for all your help. I appreciate it.

All the best,

Porcupine
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#12
wannabe1

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When you fond out what the problem is, would you mind sharing it with us?
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#13
porcupine

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Hi,

I got my computer back from the shop. He said I had two unrelated problems. One, he said I had viruses. He mentioned in particular that I had a rogue virus. He also replaced my screen card. Everything seems to be working now.

The only way I knew spam was being sent by my computer in the past was because I received spam with my own email address. That explained why sometimes my friends don't receive my messages -- they go into spam folders. Is there any way to verify that no more spam is being sent?

Thanks
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