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Auto entry (default entry) in an Excel cell


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#16
Dave2009

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Jonesey,

Column D has the drop down selections.

Ideally, entering data into column A should trigger column D to populate, but I believe the way the code operates anytime a change is made to the worksheet column D is populated if Column B is empty.

I had thought about using a form for data entry and tested one, but the data going into column B (Vendors) can be highly repetitive and found the auto complete capabilities (not sure if I'm calling this the right name) was easier and faster than using a form. The form wasn't created in VB though , but through the Data menu and selecting Form.

I don't even think I know enough to say I'm barely conversant in VB, but would like to be. Which brings up a question; with so many references on the net and books available, where and how does one go about starting to learn and understand VB?

Thank you again.

Dave
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#17
Jonesey

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Dave, I'm going to be very busy at work for the next few days, so I'll have to come back to this one.

To answer your second question, you need to get a book which deals specifically with VBE, not the other variations like VBA.

Also, a very good way of understanding VB's syntax and command language is to simply record a macro - pick a variety of tasks, copying & pasting data etc, and examine the code afterwards.

It should start to make sense once you've done a few.

There are one or two aspects of VB that you can't record and that's the use of variables and loops.

Variables are absolutely key to data manipulation, as are all the different kind of loops you can set up where repetition is involved.

Have fun!!!!
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#18
Dave2009

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Hi Jonesey,

I'm just getting back to this project myself. I guess I would like to finish off 2 items. The converting lower case entries into upper case using ucase, and using a procedure name for the code you provided.

I looked at how ucase functions and couldn't figure out how to set it up since there are 3 possible text entries that may need to be converted.

I also tried creating the procedure name DataEntry and inserted that where you suggested, but that didn't work for me.

Thank you for everything

Dave
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#19
Dan M. Appel

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I have a partial or somewhat valuable suggestion that at least will make it easier than going to each individual cell and typing zero.

Type zero in the first cell of values in a column then grab the little square on the bottom right of the cell and drag it down as many cells as you wish to have zeros. There is probably a way to automate this for all the cells you want zero in in a spreadsheet that will work for us non-techies, but this at least will get you started.
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#20
MissDippy

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Hi

I found this thread, looking to solve a similar problem, and have resolved it so I thought I would post as it may be helpful for others.

I have a spreadsheet to monitor a youth work programme and have a field with "Open" or "Not Open" as to whether a young person is on a programme. I have a filter to only show "Open" young people so need to make sure that any new rows (young people) which are added are defaulted as "Open" cases and appear on the filtered list until changed to "Not Open". My solution was simple (although a bit clunky). I entered an IF statement which looks at the Name field, and if this is not blank, then checks the Open/Not Open Field and if it is blank enters "Open" and if not enters whatever is in that field. Hope this makes sense.
My filter then looks at the calculated field.

The formula is as follows

=IF(NOT(ISBLANK(B2)),IF(X2="","Open",X2),"")

B2 is the name field and X2 is the Open/Not Open field.
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