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Ubuntu linux [hardy] Samba trouble


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#16
Titan8990

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Basically all Linux boxes ship with a firewall called netfilter that it is built in to the kernel. Most hardware firewalls are based of netfilter. The more common name for netfilter is what configures it known as IPtables. The firewall is extremely powerful and configurable. That power and comparability comes with the price of being somewhat difficult to learn. Out of the box the Ubuntu firewall is set to permissive as there is no reason for it stock. Unlike Windows, Ubuntu starts with no listening ports.


Here is an example of an IPtables script configuration from the IPtables website:

Example rc.firewall script

#!/bin/sh
#
# rc.firewall - Initial SIMPLE IP Firewall script for Linux 2.4.x and iptables
#
# Copyright © 2001 Oskar Andreasson <bluefluxATkoffeinDOTnet>
#
# This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
# it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
# the Free Software Foundation; version 2 of the License.
#
# This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
# but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
# MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the
# GNU General Public License for more details.
#
# You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
# along with this program or from the site that you downloaded it
# from; if not, write to the Free Software Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple
# Place, Suite 330, Boston, MA 02111-1307 USA
#

###########################################################################
#
# 1. Configuration options.
#

#
# 1.1 Internet Configuration.
#

INET_IP="194.236.50.155"
INET_IFACE="eth0"
INET_BROADCAST="194.236.50.255"

#
# 1.1.1 DHCP
#

#
# 1.1.2 PPPoE
#

#
# 1.2 Local Area Network configuration.
#
# your LAN's IP range and localhost IP. /24 means to only use the first 24
# bits of the 32 bit IP address. the same as netmask 255.255.255.0
#

LAN_IP="192.168.0.2"
LAN_IP_RANGE="192.168.0.0/16"
LAN_IFACE="eth1"

#
# 1.3 DMZ Configuration.
#

#
# 1.4 Localhost Configuration.
#

LO_IFACE="lo"
LO_IP="127.0.0.1"

#
# 1.5 IPTables Configuration.
#

IPTABLES="/usr/sbin/iptables"

#
# 1.6 Other Configuration.
#

###########################################################################
#
# 2. Module loading.
#

#
# Needed to initially load modules
#

/sbin/depmod -a

#
# 2.1 Required modules
#

/sbin/modprobe ip_tables
/sbin/modprobe ip_conntrack
/sbin/modprobe iptable_filter
/sbin/modprobe iptable_mangle
/sbin/modprobe iptable_nat
/sbin/modprobe ipt_LOG
/sbin/modprobe ipt_limit
/sbin/modprobe ipt_state

#
# 2.2 Non-Required modules
#

#/sbin/modprobe ipt_owner
#/sbin/modprobe ipt_REJECT
#/sbin/modprobe ipt_MASQUERADE
#/sbin/modprobe ip_conntrack_ftp
#/sbin/modprobe ip_conntrack_irc
#/sbin/modprobe ip_nat_ftp
#/sbin/modprobe ip_nat_irc

###########################################################################
#
# 3. /proc set up.
#

#
# 3.1 Required proc configuration
#

echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward

#
# 3.2 Non-Required proc configuration
#

#echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/conf/all/rp_filter
#echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/conf/all/proxy_arp
#echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_dynaddr

###########################################################################
#
# 4. rules set up.
#

######
# 4.1 Filter table
#

#
# 4.1.1 Set policies
#

$IPTABLES -P INPUT DROP
$IPTABLES -P OUTPUT DROP
$IPTABLES -P FORWARD DROP

#
# 4.1.2 Create userspecified chains
#

#
# Create chain for bad tcp packets
#

$IPTABLES -N bad_tcp_packets

#
# Create separate chains for ICMP, TCP and UDP to traverse
#

$IPTABLES -N allowed
$IPTABLES -N tcp_packets
$IPTABLES -N udp_packets
$IPTABLES -N icmp_packets

#
# 4.1.3 Create content in userspecified chains
#

#
# bad_tcp_packets chain
#

$IPTABLES -A bad_tcp_packets -p tcp --tcp-flags SYN,ACK SYN,ACK \
-m state --state NEW -j REJECT --reject-with tcp-reset
$IPTABLES -A bad_tcp_packets -p tcp ! --syn -m state --state NEW -j LOG \
--log-prefix "New not syn:"
$IPTABLES -A bad_tcp_packets -p tcp ! --syn -m state --state NEW -j DROP

#
# allowed chain
#

$IPTABLES -A allowed -p TCP --syn -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A allowed -p TCP -m state --state ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A allowed -p TCP -j DROP

#
# TCP rules
#

$IPTABLES -A tcp_packets -p TCP -s 0/0 --dport 21 -j allowed
$IPTABLES -A tcp_packets -p TCP -s 0/0 --dport 22 -j allowed
$IPTABLES -A tcp_packets -p TCP -s 0/0 --dport 80 -j allowed
$IPTABLES -A tcp_packets -p TCP -s 0/0 --dport 113 -j allowed

#
# UDP ports
#

#$IPTABLES -A udp_packets -p UDP -s 0/0 --destination-port 53 -j ACCEPT
#$IPTABLES -A udp_packets -p UDP -s 0/0 --destination-port 123 -j ACCEPT
#$IPTABLES -A udp_packets -p UDP -s 0/0 --destination-port 2074 -j ACCEPT
#$IPTABLES -A udp_packets -p UDP -s 0/0 --destination-port 4000 -j ACCEPT

#
# In Microsoft Networks you will be swamped by broadcasts. These lines
# will prevent them from showing up in the logs.
#

#$IPTABLES -A udp_packets -p UDP -i $INET_IFACE -d $INET_BROADCAST \
#--destination-port 135:139 -j DROP

#
# If we get DHCP requests from the Outside of our network, our logs will
# be swamped as well. This rule will block them from getting logged.
#

#$IPTABLES -A udp_packets -p UDP -i $INET_IFACE -d 255.255.255.255 \
#--destination-port 67:68 -j DROP

#
# ICMP rules
#

$IPTABLES -A icmp_packets -p ICMP -s 0/0 --icmp-type 8 -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A icmp_packets -p ICMP -s 0/0 --icmp-type 11 -j ACCEPT

#
# 4.1.4 INPUT chain
#

#
# Bad TCP packets we don't want.
#

$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p tcp -j bad_tcp_packets

#
# Rules for special networks not part of the Internet
#

$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p ALL -i $LAN_IFACE -s $LAN_IP_RANGE -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p ALL -i $LO_IFACE -s $LO_IP -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p ALL -i $LO_IFACE -s $LAN_IP -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p ALL -i $LO_IFACE -s $INET_IP -j ACCEPT

#
# Special rule for DHCP requests from LAN, which are not caught properly
# otherwise.
#

$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p UDP -i $LAN_IFACE --dport 67 --sport 68 -j ACCEPT

#
# Rules for incoming packets from the internet.
#

$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p ALL -d $INET_IP -m state --state ESTABLISHED,RELATED \
-j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p TCP -i $INET_IFACE -j tcp_packets
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p UDP -i $INET_IFACE -j udp_packets
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p ICMP -i $INET_IFACE -j icmp_packets

#
# If you have a Microsoft Network on the outside of your firewall, you may
# also get flooded by Multicasts. We drop them so we do not get flooded by
# logs
#

#$IPTABLES -A INPUT -i $INET_IFACE -d 224.0.0.0/8 -j DROP

#
# Log weird packets that don't match the above.
#

$IPTABLES -A INPUT -m limit --limit 3/minute --limit-burst 3 -j LOG \
--log-level DEBUG --log-prefix "IPT INPUT packet died: "

#
# 4.1.5 FORWARD chain
#

#
# Bad TCP packets we don't want
#

$IPTABLES -A FORWARD -p tcp -j bad_tcp_packets

#
# Accept the packets we actually want to forward
#

$IPTABLES -A FORWARD -i $LAN_IFACE -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A FORWARD -m state --state ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT

#
# Log weird packets that don't match the above.
#

$IPTABLES -A FORWARD -m limit --limit 3/minute --limit-burst 3 -j LOG \
--log-level DEBUG --log-prefix "IPT FORWARD packet died: "

#
# 4.1.6 OUTPUT chain
#

#
# Bad TCP packets we don't want.
#

$IPTABLES -A OUTPUT -p tcp -j bad_tcp_packets

#
# Special OUTPUT rules to decide which IP's to allow.
#

$IPTABLES -A OUTPUT -p ALL -s $LO_IP -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A OUTPUT -p ALL -s $LAN_IP -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A OUTPUT -p ALL -s $INET_IP -j ACCEPT

#
# Log weird packets that don't match the above.
#

$IPTABLES -A OUTPUT -m limit --limit 3/minute --limit-burst 3 -j LOG \
--log-level DEBUG --log-prefix "IPT OUTPUT packet died: "

######
# 4.2 nat table
#

#
# 4.2.1 Set policies
#

#
# 4.2.2 Create user specified chains
#

#
# 4.2.3 Create content in user specified chains
#

#
# 4.2.4 PREROUTING chain
#

#
# 4.2.5 POSTROUTING chain
#

#
# Enable simple IP Forwarding and Network Address Translation
#

$IPTABLES -t nat -A POSTROUTING -o $INET_IFACE -j SNAT --to-source $INET_IP

#
# 4.2.6 OUTPUT chain
#

######
# 4.3 mangle table
#

#
# 4.3.1 Set policies
#

#
# 4.3.2 Create user specified chains
#

#
# 4.3.3 Create content in user specified chains
#

#
# 4.3.4 PREROUTING chain
#

#
# 4.3.5 INPUT chain
#

#
# 4.3.6 FORWARD chain
#

#
# 4.3.7 OUTPUT chain
#

#
# 4.3.8 POSTROUTING chain
#


The tutorial can be found here: http://iptables-tuto...s-tutorial.html

There are GUI front ends for IPtables. The most popular is firestarter: $ sudo apt-get install firestarter . It is not nearly as powerful as writing your own scripts but it will get the job done.

What device has direct access to the internet? Is it this server or is it a router?

Edited by Titan8990, 07 August 2008 - 05:59 AM.

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#17
sasuke781

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router. the server only has 1 ethernet port atm.

edit: just in case its your next question. Linksys WRT300N version 1.1 i believe

Edited by sasuke781, 07 August 2008 - 08:34 PM.

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#18
Titan8990

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Edit: wrong thread....


So this the only issue left making the SAMBA server more secure? I honestly don't think this is needed as someone would need to compromise your local network (such as cracking your wireless encryption) to gain access to the file server.

Are you using WPA/WPA2 for wireless security?

Edited by Titan8990, 08 August 2008 - 01:16 PM.

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#19
sasuke781

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yes i am, then this thread is resolved :) thank you so much
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#20
Titan8990

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It looks like the reason that it was allowing you to send without a password is because you Windows accnt does not have a password. I find it a bit confusing at best as I have never had a need not to use anonymous authentication. This guide may provide some insight: http://ubuntuforums....highlight=samba.
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