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How to Build Your Own Computer


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#31
Amst3rDamag3

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I'm missing one crucial instruction though: GROUND YOURSELF AND YOUR SYSTEM to avoid damage from static electricity, especially when handling the GPU, CPU and RAM....

You can do this by touching a bare metal part of the case or PSU or wear an anti static wrist band; http://en.wikipedia....tic_wrist_strap


I know bro, I was just positively criticizing this part of ANY pc-build.
If you have central heating / piping, you can "attach" yourself and the system to that to ground yourself for free, but don't do this during a thunderstorm, lol!


THE REST OF THE GUIDE IS JUST FINE!!! Posted Image
I should have started with saying that Posted Image
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#32
Troy

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Hello,

Read the guide again. I have included information under 2. Gathering Your Tools.

It is very important to ground yourself however I personally have never worn an anti static wrist strap or the like. I work on a bench and simply ground myself by touching the metal case as I go.

Either way, as a certified professional system builder, I take full responsibility for my actions when building a machine. The same goes for anyone building their own desktop - your computer, your actions, your problem.

The most important information I can ever give anyone about building a computer is to be patient. Never rush or you will likely make mistakes. If you are unsure what you are doing, or if something is going in the right spot, then double-check with the manual! Or search online and ask for help here on the forum. You might build a new tower in 30 minutes or 30 days, it doesn't matter. The end result is what matters. :)
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#33
Amst3rDamag3

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Posted Image Troy. you're a man of wise words...
They're there alright, patience & careful reading are the key issues here Posted Image


Great guide!


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#34
Troy

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All good mate, no hard feelings. Just watch out if you do it again...

:)
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#35
Akabilk

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Hi there,

I'm only new here (to most), but as I'm just about to start another new PC build this subject was on by mind and I thought I'd add my 2c worth.

For the person who is doing a first build and correctly installs all hardware in the case, usually they will be lucky and everything will work fine, but heaven help them trying to work out what is wrong if it doesn't and what a heck of a lot of work that is involved if it happens to be the motherboard!

I'm a firm advocate of "breadboarding" a new build. That is assembling all components one at a time outside of the case so as to test each component with mobo beep codes.

Starting off by Googling for the beep codes for your motherboard (if they are not in the mobo's manual) and then starting with installing the CPU and HSF (heatsink and fan) only, the main 2 power connections, then 1 stick of RAM, then 2 sticks of RAM (etc if more are to be installed), Video Card, plugging in keyboard and screen for access to the BIOS as sometimes the RAM setting need adjusting to their correct settings and then optical drive and HDD. Even installing the OS if you like. Each successful step should have a correct beep code when powered on. After the CPU is connected a beep code for a RAM problem should sound, because you haven't slotted it in yet or you might get a faulty CPU code instead if your unlucky.

An inbuilt mobo speaker or a small attachable one is required for breadboarding (easy to find from an old case or cheap to buy from a electronics parts store). A small screw driver can be used to short the ON/OFF connection pins or a connectible ON/OFF switch if you have one is preferred so you can turn the mobo power ON/OFF before and after each bit of hardware is added to the build. Never leave the power on when adding or removing a component.

Anyone who builds a lot of systems, soon discovers that about 1 in 7 (or so) builds comes with a faulty or even a DOA hardware component. The Breadboarding build method certainly saves a lot of grief and extra work if there is a faulty component (you know exactly what it is from the beep codes when it is added).

Everything working OK? Now start installing it all into the case as advised by this excellent thread with clear photos, knowing in advance that it will all work if it is correctly installed. This of course is a condensed description of Breadboarding, but step-by-step guides can be googled and should be followed, not this short description.

PS EDIT: Always keep yourself grounded :)

Edited by Akabilk, 01 October 2011 - 05:39 PM.

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#36
Troy

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Hi Akabilk,

Never heard of the term "breadboarding" before, I always call it a benchbuild. I am a fan of benchbuilding, but generally I would say this is a more advanced technique whereas this guide was originally intended for a complete novice who wanted to have a go. With the computer build in the case, it is easy to see everything is secured properly and there is less chance of disaster. A benchbuild done wrong can be extremely dangerous as we are dealing with exposed parts - and lets not forget, they are being powered by a supply that plugs into the electric point at the wall.

On the positive side, I have been meaning to write up a guide for benchbuilding for a long time now, but haven't had the time to complete it. The guide would be aimed at more advanced users and would be more intended for troubleshooting a build that is not working properly.

Care to write up the guide for me? :)
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#37
Akabilk

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Care to write up the guide for me?


Unlike your own superb photo skills, you really don't want to see mine! :)

The term "breadboarding" comes from placing the motherboard on a (very dry) breadboard to gain some clearance height, but in reality a real breadboard is rarelly used but the name has stuck.

Forum Systems : "Homebuilt Breadboarding"

Here is another that shows the "breadboard" with lots of photos of a water-cooled build:

Here is the best guide though (unless watercooled), but sorry no pictures in this as they really aren't needed. The first part is for those builders who didn't Breadboard their new build and had problems "Troubleshooting a New Build".

About halfway down you will find "Here is where I start any new build" (a breadboarded computer builders guide).

Cheers,
Lee
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#38
Akabilk

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Hi Akabilk,

Never heard of the term "breadboarding" before, I always call it a benchbuild. I am a fan of benchbuilding, but generally I would say this is a more advanced technique whereas this guide was originally intended for a complete novice who wanted to have a go. With the computer build in the case, it is easy to see everything is secured properly and there is less chance of disaster. A benchbuild done wrong can be extremely dangerous as we are dealing with exposed parts - and lets not forget, they are being powered by a supply that plugs into the electric point at the wall.

On the positive side, I have been meaning to write up a guide for benchbuilding for a long time now, but haven't had the time to complete it. The guide would be aimed at more advanced users and would be more intended for troubleshooting a build that is not working properly.

Care to write up the guide for me? :)


Here you go Troy - "New Computer build? Test the hardware first".
http://forums.whatth...howtopic=120814
It would certainly save a lot of time if after building a PC and turning it on only to find that "something" is not working.

Edited by Akabilk, 11 November 2011 - 03:12 PM.

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#39
alydar

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i want to build a computer or upgrade mine so i can have 3 or 4 monitors
will this video card work?
EVGA 01G-P3-1556-KR GeForce GTX 550 Ti (Fermi) FPB 1GB 192-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support Video Card
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#40
phillpower2

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i want to build a computer or upgrade mine so i can have 3 or 4 monitors
will this video card work?
EVGA 01G-P3-1556-KR GeForce GTX 550 Ti (Fermi) FPB 1GB 192-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support Video Card


No, for multiple displays (3 or more) or a screen larger than 32" you will need at least 2GB of graphics memory, this can be achieved by a single card supported by an adequate power supply or 2 cards in SLi or Crossfire mode again supported by an adequate power supply, your present hardware will determine if you have either or both options.

NB: In a standard set-up the amount of video ports on the card/s is also a factor.
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#41
C0pyRyte

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Thank you very much for this tutorial. Helped me a lot :D!
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#42
Fenor

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Been awhile since I have been around, so I just saw this now, but I wanted to say:

WHAT AN AWESOME JOB YOU TWO DID!

Great job Artellos and Troy! :cheers:
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#43
Artellos

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Thanks everyone, It is much apreciated! :)

Regards,
Olrik
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#44
Vixie

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Reading this makes me start to panic >> this sort of thing has never been something I've good at.
First question - what are the 'standoffs' - is it something included in the case? or the motherboard?


Vixie
has a topic already running in system building it started on 13 August
http://www.geekstogo...__fromsearch__1

Macboatmaster
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#45
Troy

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Hi Vixie,

Standoffs are the small brass risers that hold the motherboard up off the case. You can see them in the first picture of the guide under section 3. The Build. If you look carefully you can see some are installed and two are laying down sideways which allows us a better look at them.

There needs to be one standoff per hole in the motherboard - no more, no less. If you look carefully under the picture referred to above, there is a note in red text about this.

Standoffs are typically included with the purchase of a new case.

Any more questions, feel free to ask!

Troy
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