Jump to content

Welcome to Geeks to Go - Register now for FREE

Geeks To Go is a helpful hub, where thousands of volunteer geeks quickly serve friendly answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts. Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more.

Create Account How it Works
Photo

Missing or corrupt files? Msvcrt.dll and hal.dll


  • Please log in to reply

#1
haloxgeneration

haloxgeneration

    New Member

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 5 posts
I am missing the msvcrt.dll file and it caused my computer to constantly reboot after appearing at a blue screen. When I tried to use the recovery console to replace it, it said "access denied"! Later I tried another method but then it said that I was missing the file hal.dll. And when I try to replace that too, I get the same message! Now that hal.dll is missing, I cannot even boot up windows without a boot disk!

Edited by haloxgeneration, 30 August 2008 - 02:45 AM.

  • 0

Advertisements


#2
SRX660

SRX660

    motto - Just get-er-done

  • Technician
  • 4,345 posts
the msvcrt dll error is usually caused by installing a program that replaces the msvcrt dll with one they have modified to work with their software.
The Msvcrt.dll library file comprises a program code to enable programs written using Microsoft Visual C++ to function correctly on your Windows system. The DLL provides basic features such as string comparison tools and mathematical operations, (such as trigonometric operations), to the programmers. Most computers contain this file.

Since the Hall dll does compare your system with a file it made(on the first computer boot) you can see why you get that error now when the msvcrt dll file has been changed.

On the Hal dll error:

1. Restart the PC. The hal.dll error could be a fluke.

2. Check for proper boot order in BIOS. You might see the hal.dll error if the boot order in BIOS is first looking at a hard drive other than your main hard drive.

If you've recently changed your boot order or recently flashed your BIOS, this may be what's causing your problem.

3. Run Windows XP System Restore from a command prompt. If this doesn't work or you're receiving the hal.dll error message before you're able to complete this process, move on to Step 3.

4. Repair or replace the boot.ini file. This will work if the cause of the problem is actually Windows XP's boot.ini file and not the hal.dll file, which is often times the case.
________________
1.Enter Windows XP Recovery Console. The Recovery Console is an advanced diagnostic mode of Windows XP with special tools that will allow you to restore the boot.ini file.
2.When you reach the command prompt (detailed in Step 6 in the link above), type the following command and then press Enter.

bootcfg /rebuild

3.The bootcfg utility will scan your hard drives for any Windows XP installations and then display the results. Follow the remaining steps to add your Windows XP installation to the boot.ini file.
4.The first prompt asks Add installation to boot list? (Yes/No/All).

Type Y in response to this question and press Enter.
5.The next prompt asks you to Enter Load Identifier:.

This is the name of the operating system. For example, type Windows XP Professional or Windows XP Home Edition and press Enter.
6.The final prompt asks you to Enter OS Load options:.

Type /Fastdetect here and press Enter.
7.Take out the Windows XP CD, type exit and then press Enter to restart your PC.

Assuming that a missing or corrupt boot.ini file was your only issue, Windows XP should now start normally.
______________________

5. Write a new partition boot sector to the Windows XP system partition. If the partition boot sector has become corrupt or isn't properly configured, you may receive the hal.dll error.
__________________
1.Enter Windows XP Recovery Console. The Recovery Console is an advanced diagnostic mode of Windows XP with special tools that will allow you to write a new partition boot sector to a your Windows XP system partition.
2.When you reach the command prompt (detailed in Step 6 in the link above), type the following command and then press Enter.

fixboot

3.The fixboot utility will write a new partition boot sector to the current system partition. This will repair any corruption that the partition boot sector may have and will undo any partition boot sector configurations that may be causing your problems.
4. Take out the Windows XP CD, type exit and then press Enter to restart your PC.

Assuming that a corrupt or unstable partition boot sector was your only issue, Windows XP should now start normally.
______________________________

6. Restore the hal.dll file from the Windows XP CD. If the hal.dll file is truly the cause of the problem, restoring it from the original Windows XP CD may do the trick.
____________________
1.Enter Windows XP Recovery Console.
2.When you reach the command prompt (detailed in Step 6 in the link above), type the following and then press Enter:

expand d:\i386\hal.dl_ c:\windows\system32\hal.dll

Using the expand command as shown above, d represents the drive letter assigned to the optical drive that your Windows XP CD is currently in. While this is most often d, your system could assign a different letter. Also, c:\windows represents the drive and folder that Windows XP is currently installed on. Again, this is most often the case but your system could be different.
3.If you're prompted to overwrite the file, press Y.
4. Take out the Windows XP CD, type exit and then press Enter to restart your PC.

Assuming that a missing or corrupt hal.dll file was your only issue, Windows XP should now start normally.
____________________

7. Perform a repair installation of Windows XP. This type of installation should replace any missing or corrupt files. Continue troubleshooting if this does not resolve the issue.

8. Perform a clean installation of Windows XP. This type of installation will completely remove Windows XP from your PC and install it again from scratch. While this will almost certainly resolve any hal.dll errors, it is a time consuming process due to the fact that all of your data must be backed up and then later restored.

If you can't gain access to your files to back them up, understand that you will lose them all if you continue with a clean installation of Windows XP.

9. Finally, if all else has failed, including the clean installation from the last step, you're most likely facing a hardware issue with your hard drive. Replace the hard drive and then perform a new installation of Windows XP.


The reason i post this is because i think it is easier to use this method than to spend days and maybe weeks trying to fix all the errors you could possible get trying anything you have read on the internet. This is the method i use for customer computers brought to my shop.

SRX660
  • 0

#3
haloxgeneration

haloxgeneration

    New Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • Pip
  • 5 posts
Thanks. I found out that my computer has a corrupted BIOS and that is what has been causing it. How do I clear the BIOS memory?
  • 0

#4
SRX660

SRX660

    motto - Just get-er-done

  • Technician
  • 4,345 posts
There should be a jumper on the motherboard you use th clear the BIOS. It usually close to the battery. Shut down the computer, unplug it and move the jumper for a few seconds, then reboot the computer. The BIOS shoud be back to factory specs.

SRX660
  • 0

#5
haloxgeneration

haloxgeneration

    New Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • Pip
  • 5 posts
Thank you very much. It worked well for a while, but then I found out I had a corrupted hard drive so it would have died anyways.
  • 0






Similar Topics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

As Featured On:

Microsoft Yahoo BBC MSN PC Magazine Washington Post HP