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Well I wanted to build a computer next year


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#1
reload147

reload147

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Well first of all which website is good for buying computer parts?
www.ebuyer.com ? ebay? amazon?

Then.. tell me if i miss anything needed for building a comp..
ok here it goes

-Case (Antec Nine Hundred 900 - Gaming Case with 200mm Top Fan - No PSU)
-Motherboard ( don't know which is good or bad ) randomly i choose (Intel BOXDP45SG LGA 775 Intel P45 ATX DDR3 Intel Motherboard - Retail )
-Graphics Card (BFG 9800GTX+ OC Edition 512MB Dual DVI HDTV Out PCI-E Graphics Card)
-Ram ( I don't know how to choose one + don't know if its gonna fit on the mother board i choose )
-Sound card(Creative Sound Blaster Audigy SE 7.1 OEM PCI Soundcard)
-Hard drive (Seagate ST3500320AS 500GB Hard Drive SATA II 7200rpm *32MB Cache* - OEM)
-USB port thing?
-CD/RW(Sony DRU-190S 20X DVD±RW DL & DVD-RAM Serial ATA - Retail Multi Bezel & Nero)
-Big fan o_0 ( if i knew the name )
-fan for motherboard?

What else?

Edited by reload147, 22 September 2008 - 02:55 PM.

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#2
=OSS*ROID=

=OSS*ROID=

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well, the site that i use and I really like is newegg.com. You will notice that many people here also use newegg. Newegg has really good prices and has awesome shipping times. One thing i noticed with the motherboard you picked out is it seems a little outdated as it only supports DDR memory. The standard for today is DDR2 and some newer computers are coming with DDR3. Also, that motherboard will not work with the graphics card you picked out. The graphics card you picked out uses PCI-E, and that motherboard supports PCI. The graphics card you choose is also very good and I highly recommend it.
One thing that you are missing is a PSU (Powersupply). Recommended for that graphics card would be about a 550-Watt PSU. I know that Thermaltake and Antec make some quality powersupplies. You also missed one of the most important things!...a CPU! I recommend getting an Intel Core 2 duo. You can get one for a low price and its performance is stunning. You could go all out and get a Intel Core 2 Quad, you can get a few that are pretty inexpensive. Also, jus so u know the USB ports are usually built into the computer case, and into the motherboard so u do not need to purchase an external one unless u have a lot of USB cords to plug in. You dont really need a fan for the motherboard, usually the case will have a fan that helps with cooling, but the CPU will need a fan. I recommend Zalman. They make very high performance fans that really cool down your system. Some Zalmans can be very pricey but u can sometimes find one for a low price. Also, u r gonna want atleast 1GB of memory so that you have enough memory for the system, not only the graphics card. If you plan on gaming, then 2GB of Ram is recommended.
So anyway, jus remember newegg.com is an awesome site and you can read the reviews that people give to see how the product performs and wat not.

Edited by X IBLaCK0uT X, 22 September 2008 - 02:33 PM.

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#3
Neil Jones

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If you want to build a computer next year, don't start setting your sights on certain bits now as they may be unavailable next year. Three months is a long time in the life of a computer.
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#4
kamille316

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If you're building next year, I suggest you follow the market to see which would be best for you. Having a list right now would be pointless because next year, there will be better products with better prices and some would become obsolete (I'm thinking the video card here).
Read up on things you will need, I suggest to go through some of the threads here to have an idea of what you will need.

Compatibility is also a key, next year, when you have picked out your parts, post it back here and we'll make suggestions. It's a bit early right now to say which products would be best for you as our suggestion will definitely change in a year.

Here's what most people would need:
Computer case - This is subjective, make sure its big enough for your needs.
Power supply - Always go with a trusted brand like Corsair, Silverstone, PC Power & Cooling, Antec, etc. You also need to make sure it has enough wattage and amperage (make sure you have enough amps in +12V rail to support your video card).
CPU/Processor - I usually recommend Intel as its a great performer but it all depends on your budget and needs. You can go Core 2 Duo or Core 2 Quad, depends on your needs but in a year from now, maybe you'll benefit more with a Quad.
Motherboard - Know what features you need like SLI or Crossfire, are you overclocking? DDR2 or DDR3, Firewire, support for x amount of RAM, etc. There is no point of spending $300 on a motherboard and you're not going to use the extra features it provides.
RAM - Need to have a compatible motherboard, so if you have DDR2 or DDR3 make sure your motherboard supports it. Also know how much RAM you need, it's usually better to have less sticks so if you want 4GB of RAM, 2x2GB is better than 4x1GB.
Video card - Base it on what you're going to use your computer for: gaming, multimedia, etc.
OS - Vista or XP, you also need to figure out if you'll be getting a 32-bit or 64-bit.
Hard drive - I am fond of Western Digital however there's also Seagate and Samsung that I trust.
DVD-drive - I use a Samsung drive and it works fine for me, most people go with Pioneer and works great.
Sound Card - You only need one if you're an audiophile, on-board is usually enough and you won't notice a difference.
Aftermarket Heatsink - You only need one if you're overclocking.

Hope that helps.
Kamille

Edited by kamille316, 22 September 2008 - 03:27 PM.

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#5
reload147

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I was just getting practiced as this will be my first time building a comp :) and want to make it under £500.
OS i might use xp because like vista uses lots of ram? And i think i got the xp cd that came with my old computer :)
I think i put a different motherboard in the list
now i need to find processor umm intel because i like intel and will the fan come with the processor? a small fan that goes above the processor thing?
so.. if my motherboard is ddr2 then i should look at ddr2 ram? im getting 2x2ram

Edited by reload147, 23 September 2008 - 01:44 AM.

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#6
=OSS*ROID=

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Ya, most processors come with a CPU fan. Just make sure it does in the description of the product. If it doesnt, I recommend Zalman as a CPU fan. And yes, if ur motherboard supports DDR2, then get DDR2 memory. Cheers! :)

Edited by X IBLaCK0uT X, 23 September 2008 - 04:39 AM.

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