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Questions About Logging Off In Windows Xp


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#1
superstar

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I have never had a way to make my system go to the login password screen when I'm not around [To protect my pc from other people in the house]. I never used the "Log Off" button in windows xp because I always thought that it would stop my downloads, slow down my pc, or cause some sort of system instability. I of course do not know if that does happen. I've always simply assumed it does!~ Not only that but I always assumed that logging off causes your system to lose ram??? Call me crazy but yes I've always thought that happens.

Anyways today I was writing a message to a friend in msn messenger when all of a sudden I pressed the wrong keys on my pc keyboard and my desktop quickly disappeared showing just my walllpaper, than it went to the windows xp login screen where you have to use a password to log onto windows. I of course am the administrator of this pc and have no other users assigned to this pc. So during the login screen you can only choose one specific user that has my name [that's me!]. Although I must state that when I start the pc in safe boot mode [which is totally unrelated to what I'm talking about], I see two user accounts:

1. Administrator [<<<<---- Spelled just like that]
2. & than the one with my name

I than googled shortcut keys that may trigger you to go into log off mode. & it turns out the "windows button + L" on your pc keyboard make you go to the windows login screen which is essentially lock mode.

Anyways I'd like to know if I'm right when I state that logging off of windows xp can make my pc slow down, lose ram speed, instability, etc. If not than I will do that when I'm not around from now on. Because I sometimes leave my pc on all night and who knows when someone will try to sneak up and do stuff on it.

Thanks...


Anymore info on logging off of windows xp would be great! Or what exactly happens when you do so... By the way what's the difference between pressing the shortcut keys and doing it from the start menu? Does the start menu do something else?
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#2
Onaipian

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Well, my knowledge range is small, but I have never heard that logging off of your account on Windows XP causes any of those things. With the exception of stopping downloads...

Think of logging off your account as walking out of your bedroom. You are standing in a hallway, and you can choose what room to enter. (In your case, you only have one option) The log in screen is simply there to give you options of what account to log onto. It shouldn't cause instability. The only effect of logging off that I can think of, is your start-up programs have to load. Just like when you restart your computer.

There isn't any difference of using a shortcut key, or using the start menu. Given you use the shortcut that matches the option you choose in the menu.

:)
piano9playa5
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#3
AitrusSkyy

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If you physically click Log Off by clicking it or hitting the Windows + L it saves your settings, closes your work and does stop any processes/programs running on that user. However if you would like to keep things running in the background but leave your pc wanting it password protected so no one else can use it while you are away all you have to do is go to your Display Settings and the Screensaver Tab. You simply tell it to use a screensaver (your choice on which) choose the amount of minutes to activate the screensaver, then check the little box that says "On Resume Display Welcome Screen"...

This will keep you logged in so your programs will continue running and if someone comes along to use your pc, they will see the log in screen. If you add a password to your user account, they will see the login screen and be unable to continue.
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#4
Fenor

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Pressing the Windows Key+L locks your computer, it doesn't log you off of the computer. If you press the Windows Key, release it, and then press the 'L' key, then it will bring up the window asking you if you want to Log off. When you log off of your computer, you lose everything that was open, it closes down all processes/programs related to that user (freeing up any memory that the processes/programs related only to that user were using), allowing you to then log on with another user account.

Locking your computer means just that. It locks the computer so that only you (or an administrator account) can unlock the computer and use it. All of the processes/programs that were running will still be running, so that when you come back to your computer, everything is the exact same as when you left it.

The Lock feature is used all the time in businesses, so that when an employee walks away from his/her machine, they can hit Windows+L and be safe in the fact that no one will be able to get into their system while they are away.

Logging off isn't really a useful feature unless you have multiple user accounts on the system. You are best to use the Lock feature instead.

Hope that clears things up for you.

Fenor

Edited by Fenor, 24 September 2008 - 09:58 AM.

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