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ATX12V plug burned up


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#1
drnads

drnads

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Hi all, I recently upgraded my video boards, EN7600GS w/512 each, to a single 8800GTX liquid cooled unit w/768. In the last few weeks I've been having problems with random shutdowns. No warnings at all, just boom, dead. Then it won't restart for a while, just fans and lights come on for a few seconds then nothing. I disconnected all the drives and still nothing. I was about to try a spare psu when I discovered that the ATX12V 4pin plug was burned and the connector to the psu is melted a little. Can anyone tell me what that 12V is for and what could cause the plug to burn like that. This is on an ASUS M2N32-SLI Deluxe w/ Athlon 64X2 6000+, 4GB of Corsair XMS, Thermaltake 750W psu.

TIA,

DrNads
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#2
Neil Jones

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The 12v 4 pin connector provides power to the processor. It is a necessary connection for normal operation.

This is not normal behaviour, you should replace that power supply.
To burn the pin and the cable leading back to the unit would mean either a heck of a lot of power's come down that 12v rail, or the board is sending voltage back when it shouldn't be. Either way, not good. Your hope is that it hasn't fried your board as that's an expensive motherboard. Try another PSU.
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#3
drnads

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Thanks for the reply. I have to replace the mobo anyway as the pin was burnt off, and I have a spare psu(550W) to try before I buy another of the larger ones. I am curious as to what could have caused this as I don't want to replace the board only to have it happen again. Could the video board pull enough current to do this, or could it possibly have just been a bad connection from the start causing high resistance in the pin? I've never seen this in a computer before, but plenty of times in my line of work. Guess there's a first time for everything.


Just got off the phone with ASUS, the mobo is still under warrantee. Lucky day, got my RMA and a new one on the way. :)

Edited by drnads, 07 October 2008 - 03:43 PM.

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