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quest for cheapest internet solution


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#1
moscatomg1

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I do most internet from home with a desktop sys. I've been paying Cox $40 plus (home account) and lately $70 plus (bus. acct.) for cable internet. I can't do this anymore. I'm looking for cheap but decent internet.

1) Obviously, dial up (even unlimited) is cheap, and I don't mind the slower connection. But I think it still runs total close to $40-$50 range when I factor monthly for the added telephone bill using the land line.

2) I read about some more tech. savvy folks with affordable cell phone plans with approx. $6 internet plans who then hook the cell phone to the computer (often via a router) for cheap internet access (clearly a solution that combines the cell phone--which we all have now--with this ridiculously low internet plan is the best deal b/c it negates the need for both the land line bill and even the cheapest $20 dial up internet plan).

-The problem with option 2 is it seems excruciatingly difficult for the noob (from the pages that I found: http://devices.natetrue.com/mobileap/ and http://www.theintern...-tethered-modem or this unresolved discussion at http://forum.noteboo...d.php?t=182094). Those guides are more than 1 and 2 1/2 years old, though, now, and I wonder what complexities and other aspects--like the appropriate cell phones to use--may be outdated.

-So does anyone know of the best, affordable land line and unlimited dial up plans? And/or are there some simpler, updated guides for the cellphone-to-computer internet option that anyone knows about (and a recommended cellphone/plan for that purpose, which is past due for me anyway)?

Thank you for any advice.

Edited by moscatomg1, 25 October 2008 - 02:44 PM.

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#2
moscatomg1

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Umm. . . Nobody ever responded to this (almost 2 wks). Is there a better area on the forums instead of "Networking" for more general internet questions? Also, somewhat related to my first post: does anyone here have any past experience with trying to get out of one of these internet contracts. Cox is being extremely difficult, despite having been a customer for 5 yrs plus and only wanting to downgrade (not even leaving Cox!). As long as you're paid up on current usage, do they send the Coll. Agency after you for breaking? Is fine print like: "this agreement binds Customer to Rates, Terms, and Conditions of Service applicable to each of the services selected above, including any termination penalties that may apply?" really hold up in a court, when considering consumer rights tendencies these days (emphasis added). I know, I signed the [bleep] thing. My fault. But if anyone wants to offer any info (other than that point), on either of my posts, I would be grateful.
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#3
james_8970

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This will vary by area, so if you posted what area you are currently living in, you may get more useful information. I just want to give you a heads up, don't use your cellphones internet to download stuff to your computer. A guy came up with this "smart" idea in Alberta, Canada and his ISP slapped him with a 21,000$ bill, even though the plan was listed as a unlimited bandwidth service. Always read the fine print.

As far the the contract goes, you could always make up some kind of an excuse to get out of the contract (e.g. say you're moving). They can't bind you to a contract for the rest of your life, I'd assume (or hope) that there is some kind of dated specified on the contract and if there is, you'll have to wait it out. You often sign up for an x amount of years contract for things like this because your ISP needs to be assured that they are going to get a return on the equipment that they've given to you, similar to a cell phone plan. Though, if you just have a modem, that wouldn't be the reasoning behind the contract.
James

Edited by james_8970, 06 November 2008 - 10:05 PM.

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#4
moscatomg1

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thanks for the reply. I guess the cell phone method I mentioned is pretty exclusive/problematic still. But if my area helps get any more info/responses, it's NWArkansas. As for the contract. Yeah there is an end date. Seems far from now, though. But they didn't provide any equipment--not even a modem. Probably no way out, but I thought I'd ask.
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#5
james_8970

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You might be able to negotiate a new contract, you're not out anything to ask. Rule of thumb though, never sign a contract that lasts too long, 2-3 years at the longest. Technology prices depreciate rapidly over time so you may find your neighbor paying far less for the same service, as he got a contract more recently. Same applies to cell phones and pretty well any other service out there. This is why there are contracts after all, to penny and nickel the consumer to death.
I won't be able to provide you with any information regarding what you best methods are as I don't live in your area or country for that matter. I simply suggested you to add the area in which you live, as chances are far better that someone else on this board may live in your area and be able to provide you with some tips.
Best of luck :)
James

Edited by james_8970, 06 November 2008 - 10:04 PM.

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#6
jt1990

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Here's what my parents did recently: They eliminated the long distance calling plan from our phone, and went with VOIP over cable. They chose Ooma because they let us keep our existing phone number. I think they paid $200 for the equipment, and nothing for the calling. No phone bill - ever!

I would look at seeing if you can get a decent connection and go with VOIP for your phone, that way you're only paying for the internet instead of internet and phone.
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#7
dsenette

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$6 internet plans

not gonna happen....i can't think of a single cell provider that's priced that low....the lowest i've seen was $30 ISH and that was VERY limited on resources
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#8
james_8970

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Pretty sure that was a typo and he was meaning to type $60.
James
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#9
moscatomg1

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actually, some of those links in that first post ref. to approx. $6 internet plans on cell phones...but remember these links look a bit out of date (maybe prior to limits being strictly enforced), and I wonder if what these people are talking about as their method of access may be illegitimate--which is another reason why I posted about this topic in the first place.
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#10
james_8970

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Are you sure that this 6$ fee isn't a $6 additional charge added on to the original bill? I don't think you could ever find a cell phone bill for a monthly rate of $6, let alone one with internet access.
James
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#11
moscatomg1

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oh, definitely an added charge on top of the bill--that was what I assumed. what I had been wondering about the seemingly complex method discussed in those links was feasibility, legitimacy, and if any one around these forums had tried it.
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#12
james_8970

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Well that makes a lot more sense.
It's possible as people do it, but your phone would have to have a high data capacity as well as a USB port, assuming you are attempting to download something. It's legitimate as well, assuming you're intentions of downloading are legitimate (if they are not, we cannot help you here). I can almost guarantee you that there will be fine print protecting the ISP from this and you'll be looking at dial up speeds, unless you have a new cellphone using the newer 3G network. In the grand scheme of things, I really don't think this idea is convenient at all and suggest you search other means of accessing cheaper Internet.
James

Edited by james_8970, 08 November 2008 - 05:59 PM.

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#13
moscatomg1

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since this is relevant to my initial post and subject, I thought I'd just continue the thread...someone in one of my classes said he just bought some kind of hardware (a something "board") that allowed him to host if he wanted to. Does this mean he could be his own server? Regardless, this made me wonder: if you can buy some hardware for a reasonable price and you have a regular LAN phone service, can you be your own dial up internet service provider? I know this is probably a lot more complicated than I'm articulating. What would be involved in this--trying to be your own dial-up ISP? Is it feasible for a newbie? Is it feasible on a budget, and once you're set up are there any monthly expenses other than that ordinary phone bill? I guess if it was easy then everyone would do it, so there's likely a lot more here than I am guessing with my very limited knowledge.

Edited by moscatomg1, 23 November 2008 - 03:52 PM.

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