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Surge Protectors and UPS


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#1
Chicken mania

Chicken mania

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Hi folks, not too sure if this is the right place to ask this.

a) Do you use a surge protector(not an ordinary powerstrip!) together with a UPS or are they meant to be used separately? I've heard that the UPS performs better when plugged into a surge protector while others have stated that a power strip is more than enough.

b) Which brand of surge protectors would you recommend? APC SurgeArrest or Belkin SurgeMaster? I know that the SurgeMaster Gold is highly recommended but it's kinda expensive where I live. So, I'm eyeing the APC P5BT-UK 'cos of its' features.
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#2
SRX660

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I live in the lightning state( Fla) in the USA. I learned many years ago what can happen with no protection from power surges and power outages. I have had 5 computer's fry and 5 more that had some kind of damage done. I now even have my refrigerator, stereo, and Televisions On UPSes, since i have had a direct lightning strike to my house( and continue to have). A direct lightning strike has started a fire in my yard next to my house. I carry 5 large fire extinguisher's in my house for this reason.

My system consist's of 2 large surge protectors plugged into the walls, then 3 - 1000va UPSes plugged into the SP's, with 7 computers plugged into the UPSes. I picked the 1000va units simply because they have 8 plug in ports. Smaller units usually only have 6. I get by with a 4 port KVM for 4 computers, which lets me plug 2 computers towers and monitors for each USP. A second 4 port KVM is used for my 3 main computers that are on one UPS.

Suffuice to say that it looks like spaghetti behind my desks( even with wiring organizers used) but the system works. I have not had a computer damaged in the last 5 years.

What this does is give me enough time to shut down my systems if the power goes out, with the UPSes. Generally i will not have more than 3 computers running at any one time. It also protects from surges and lightning strikes. I have had only one surge protector fry from a lightning strike which happened last year. The SP got so hot that i could smell the plastic burning in the house and the plastic next to a plug-in was melted. The UPS plugged into the SP was not hurt.

While you do not need a SP if you are using a UPS, i find the SP's are cheaper to replace if damaged than the UPSes. That is why i run such a redundant system. Better safe than sorry as far as i am concerned.

As for the TV's, Stereo, and Refrig, they are just plugged into small UPSes. Why do i do this? Because one lightning strike fried a $1000 refrigerator, and caused a stereo system to have such low volume it was worthless. Since installing UPses i have had no problems with anything.

OVERKILL? maybe so but i have had direct lightning strikes every year. So i will not take any chances. I usually build my own computers at a normal cost around $800 for each tower. I cannot afford to replace these more than once per year, which is what i do normally. That way i can sell the older computer and recover some of my money back on them.

SRX660
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#3
Chicken mania

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Thank you for the information! :) Well, Singapore is fairly lightning prone, however, any and all computer hardware malfunctions have been attributed mainly to power issues. The wiring in this apartment is fairly old(this building was from the 70s when this country started creating high-rise apartments!) but since this place is going to be demolished soon, I don't feel like wasting moolah to replace it.

I really regret not getting a UPS earlier. I just fried a hard disk(ouch!) and lost all my music files. It can't even be detected by Testdisk and so it's goodbye. And this was due to an ageing connector, for the light switch, in my room causing issues with the electrical outlet but thank goodness, the music files can be easily ripped out again. And even much earlier, PSU issues killed some of my parts and now that I'm thinking, it's probably the same issue even though it was at another outlet.

I'm considering getting an APC 525 ES for starters. :) I don't know how well it'd hold up but since I'm only looking for the bare minimum: to keep the pc up and alive just enough for me to shut it down and save my data, I won't be needing anything more, would I?

http://rack.com.sg/p...products_id/234

Which brand of Surge protectors do you use and which models? :)

For anyone interested, my system specs are:

PSU: Seventeam ST520-PAF
Hdd: 1 IDE + 2 Sata hard disks
DVD: 1 combo drive
Sound: USB DAC + DT440 headphones
Memory: 2 x 1 gb Kingston PC5300 ram
Graphics card: 8600GT
Monitor: Samsung 2253LW
External hard disk: 1 SATA hdd in a self-powered Icute external casing. Connection is USB and since I've lost the box, I've no idea what the wattage for this item is.
USB Receiver for wireless keyboard and mouse
Canon MP130 Printer. I rarely turn this on, no need for it to be wired to a UPS.

Edited by Chicken mania, 29 October 2008 - 01:16 PM.

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#4
Kemasa

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You don't want to plug in a surge protector into a UPS, the other way is fine. The reason for this is most UPS do not put out a sin wave and so a surge protector will create an additional load on the UPS and will cause the runtime to be less.
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#5
Chicken mania

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You don't want to plug in a surge protector into a UPS, the other way is fine. The reason for this is most UPS do not put out a sin wave and so a surge protector will create an additional load on the UPS and will cause the runtime to be less.


Right... thanks for the info! :)

Btw, I got the UPS and it's now charging. It's currently connected to the computer but I'm having a problem here. Under Windows XP: Control Panel ----> Power options -----> tab "UPS"----> Select. Well, when i try to select the model and type from the list of options and press "Finish", and then "Apply", I get this error:

"the ups service could not access the specified comm. port"

How do I solve this? :/ Oh and yes, Serial port is enabled in the Bios.

And my UPS is this:

http://www.apc.com/r...total_watts=200

Edited by Chicken mania, 01 November 2008 - 08:31 PM.

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