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Whats the optimal temp for a cpu?


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#1
undun40cal

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Simple question, what is the optimal temperature that a cpu should be and is my comp in danger of frying?

Here's the temp of my system and cpu.
CPU: 53c (127.4 F)
System: 32c (89.6 F)

Edited by undun40cal, 28 October 2008 - 05:48 PM.

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#2
hfcg

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Hello,
It depends on the processor, and if you are overclocking.
I do not overclock.
My cpu is a dual core pentium D 845 / 3.00GHz.
It runs about 55 Celcius.
This IS hot for SOME processors, but it is normal for mine.
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#3
undun40cal

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Hello,
It depends on the processor, and if you are overclocking.
I do not overclock.
My cpu is a dual core pentium D 845 / 3.00GHz.
It runs about 55 Celcius.
This IS hot for SOME processors, but it is normal for mine.


Heres my rig info. It's a pretty basic comp and i don't overclock (Have no idea what that is lol).

Here is my rig info (Also displayed in my profile).

System: Windows XP Home Edition Service Pack 3 (build 2600)
Gateway T3410
Enclosure Type: Desktop
2.00 gigahertz AMD Sempron
Board: First International Computer, Inc. K8MC51G PCB 1.x
NVIDIA GeForce 6100
Sitecom Gigabit Ethernet Adapter LN-027v2
WDC WD1600BB-22GUC0 [Hard drive] (160.04 GB)
Operating System: Windows XP Home SP3
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#4
W-Unit

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I'm no expert on this subject, and I don't really know the average temp for a build like yours, but if you're not overclocking and aren't experiencing any problems, you should be fine.

There's nothing really to be scared of either; it's not like your computer will allow your CPU to overheat to the point of damaging any of its components; it will shut down long before this happens. At which point you can go into the BIOS and fix the problem by decreasing your CPU's FSB. If it becomes a problem and you have to trade performance in order to achieve stability, consider purchasing an aftermarket CPU heatsink and fan.

If worst comes to worst and your CPU is overheating and you don't know how to fix it, a quick, temporary fix would be just to take the side panel off your case and point a regular old fan at it. I've done this for a long time with my old OC'd desktop because I don't want to decrease its performance and I don't want to purchase any new PC fans or cooling systems as I'm about to buy a new PC anyways.

If your PC is pre-assembled, don't worry about it; I've never heard of a pre-assembled PC overheating unless it was OC'd.
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#5
Granz00

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Pre-assembled PC's are far from being immune to overheating... I wouldn't be worried for now though. The maximum temperature for your CPU is probably around about 90c. However, if you want your CPU to perform better, and to be better protected, buy the aftermarket heatsink. My signature contains a high value heatsink and thermal paste at a good price. The only thing is you would want to buy the retention bracket, and the heatsink is pretty big, so you want to make sure you have enough room.

My rig has my 3GHz Core 2 Duo running at 3.4GHz per core. Even after overclocking I'm running up to 10c cooler then when I had the regular heatsink (now running in the 32c to 35c range).
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#6
hfcg

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I meant for you to look up (Google) the specs for your processor.
This would answer your question.
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