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#1
Skyedog

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I have 2 8800gts 512MB cards, 1 E6600, 1 E6850 processor, an ASUS P5N-E SLI mobo, and another 250G harddrive and PSU. I don't want to run SLI so I am looking to get a case and another mobo and have 2 pretty decent desktops. I already have another monitor :) , keypad and mouse. SO, what do all of you think? Which ASUS would be the best upgrade from the mobo I have now with out breaking the bank?

Edited by Skyedog, 01 November 2008 - 03:23 PM.

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#2
james_8970

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What kind of price point are you looking towards? Are you just wanting to run everything at stock settings?
James
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#3
Skyedog

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Yes, or just some minor overclocking. But I would like another ASUS, I was able to switch the hard drives from each computer with out any problems when I had 2 Intel boards. Even tho' the boards weren't the same, they would work fine. So can I assume that with a decent upgrade from my P5N-E SLI to another ASUS I would be able to do it again if need be? :)

Edited by Skyedog, 02 November 2008 - 02:58 PM.

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#4
james_8970

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A reformat is strongly recommended when changing motherboards. Are you looking for a motherboard in the ~150$ range?
James
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#5
Skyedog

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Reformatting the was already a definate in my mind, but thanks for the reminder. I have a 500GIG in my latest machine, and plan to use my 250GIG in my new build along with putting in the E6850 for the speed. And this may sound stupid, but is a 250GIG at 7200rpm as fast as a 500GIG at 7200rpm if they have the same data transfer rate of 3Gb/s? I would say in the $150-$250 range.

Edited by Skyedog, 02 November 2008 - 03:11 PM.

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#6
james_8970

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is a 250GIG at 7200rpm as fast as a 500GIG at 7200rpm if they have the same data transfer rate of 3Gb/s? I would say in the $150-$250 range.

What you are looking at (3GB/s) is the version of the SATA device and it's maximum capable transfer rate. While the device is capable of reaching these speeds, it never will as the bandwidth is set to a level so great, that it'll never become the bottleneck in the device. The determining speed factors range quite a bit in a hard drive, though the main two are the data density and updated controllers. Though, something that cannot be forgotten is the fact that there are newer drives that have larger densities but aren't as fast as other drives with comparable data densities due to the fact that they are targeted to different groups such as the green movement (WD GP series) and thus they are designed to draw less power, rather then having greater performance. Basically what it comes down to is that simply stating a drives copacity is not enough for me to be able to determine which of your two drives are faster. I'd need model numbers in order to do this.
James
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#7
Skyedog

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1 Seagate model ST3500641AS-RK, and a Westen Digital WD2500KS WD Caviar SE16.
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#8
jst42day

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A reformat is strongly recommended when changing motherboards. Are you looking for a motherboard in the ~150$ range?
James


I have a question.
Why do I need to do a reformat? If I remeber correctly, reformatting will cause me to lose
what ever I had on the drive.
What's the purpose of imaging programs that can do a HIR?
I haven't tried this with a new mobo, but it's one of the reasons I bought the
imaging software.
Thanks.
jst42day
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#9
Skyedog

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"Why do I need to do a reformat?" if you stay with the same manufacturer sometimes you can get away with out reformatting. Otherwise, the BIOS are the reason for reformatting. Am I right everyone?
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#10
jt1990

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You need to reformat because even if you stay with the same manufacturer, a different model will mess up the settings/OS.
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#11
wannabe1

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Hello Skyedog...

You will not have to format, but it will be necessary to run an in-place upgrade (repair installation) of your operating system so that the hardware abstraction layer (HAL) can be recreated for the new hardware. This procedure will not affect your data, it will only replace the system files and recreate those files that are specific to the hardware.

The in-place upgrade will, however, remove all installed Windows Updates....you will have to apply all those again after the repair completes.

wannabe1
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#12
Skyedog

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Back to the topic at hand. Can anyone suggest an upper middle of the road ASUS mobo. As I said I have 1 computer with an ASUS P5N-E SLI and would like another ASUS. Something that would allow for future upgrades, I doubt I will ever go to a quad core, but....
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#13
james_8970

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Sorry about my delayed response, somehow I over looked over this thread.

1 Seagate model ST3500641AS-RK, and a Westen Digital WD2500KS WD Caviar SE16.

The Seagate model is faster.

As far as motherboards go, I suggest this motherboard. It's a great board and also has free shipping to boot! The P5Q-E is also a far bit better for a marginal increase in price, but I don't think that boards advantages would serve you any better, though that's ultimately up to you. Both are excellent boards and amongst the more popular boards selling at the moment.
James

Edited by james_8970, 05 November 2008 - 02:45 PM.

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#14
Skyedog

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Hey James, how did you come to the conclusion I had the LGA775 socket? And a small local shop recommended the ASUS P5N-D. What is your opinion of that board? Just to let everyone know, I do check out reviews at sites like ExtremeTech and C-NET, and the major computer mags, but who can test or review every new mobo. So I appreciate all input. P5Q-E board looks pretty good, just checked the specs.

Edited by Skyedog, 05 November 2008 - 04:06 PM.

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#15
james_8970

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Hey James, how did you come to the conclusion I had the LGA775 socket?

Because in your first post you stated.

1 E6600, 1 E6850 processor,


The P45 chipset is far better then nVidia's chipsets. You are paying for features that you will not use on that board, such as SLI, not to mention that board is a tad more money.
Both boards are good, but again, I'd choose the P45 any day, before taking the 750i, unless I was considering SLI as a future possibility.
James
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