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Random Freezes - Likely PSU Issue


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#1
kdips

kdips

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Hi all. Since I built my current rig back in July I've suffered from occasional freezes that require a hard restart. They've become more and more common and are driving me insane. I thought it was the ram for a while, but after testing both sticks with memtest for some time they came up clean. I just ran everest and got a peculiarly low number for my +12V line:

power_supply.jpg


My PSU is an APEVIA 500W model. Obviously this is a big deal, but I lack the technical expertise to understand what is causing this incredibly low value and what I need to do about it. New PSU? Is this most likely the cause of my freezes?

Thanks for the help.

Kevin

Edited by kdips, 16 December 2008 - 02:46 AM.

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#2
Major Payne

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Not gonna be too helpful, but will give you some ideas. It could be a bad sensor reporting as the fans usually run on 12-volts. The supply you have has two 12-volt outputs so there may be a definite problem with the one supplying the fan to the CPU. If it overheats, the PC will freeze up. BTDT :)

Possibly pull a side (or both if necessary) off of PC (keep safety in mind while PC is plugged in) and check for dust/dirt clogging fan. See if CPU fan is running at a reasonable speed for cooling. One test is to power down, unplug PC and swap the power supply connectors to fans. Then recheck with Everest Home. Check if Power Supply fan speed is reported as what it was for CPU. If CPU speed is same (or still normal) and 12-volts is still being reported the same by Everest, then I would say a bad sensor, but if it now says +12-volts, then you have a bad PS.

Your temps seem to be very good though> Maybe a bad connection??

Not much help I know. Just ideas about what I would try. There is a more updated software other than Everest, but can't remember the name of it right now. SpeedFan would give some reports, but the one I can't remember name of is a lot more comprehensive in its reporting.
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#3
PedroDaGR8

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Not gonna be too helpful, but will give you some ideas. It could be a bad sensor reporting as the fans usually run on 12-volts. The supply you have has two 12-volt outputs so there may be a definite problem with the one supplying the fan to the CPU. If it overheats, the PC will freeze up. BTDT :)

Possibly pull a side (or both if necessary) off of PC (keep safety in mind while PC is plugged in) and check for dust/dirt clogging fan. See if CPU fan is running at a reasonable speed for cooling. One test is to power down, unplug PC and swap the power supply connectors to fans. Then recheck with Everest Home. Check if Power Supply fan speed is reported as what it was for CPU. If CPU speed is same (or still normal) and 12-volts is still being reported the same by Everest, then I would say a bad sensor, but if it now says +12-volts, then you have a bad PS.

Your temps seem to be very good though> Maybe a bad connection??

Not much help I know. Just ideas about what I would try. There is a more updated software other than Everest, but can't remember the name of it right now. SpeedFan would give some reports, but the one I can't remember name of is a lot more comprehensive in its reporting.


I am gonna say that is a bad sensor. A reail at THAT low of a voltage should shut down the PSU. THis can EASILY be checked with a <$4 digital meter (you can pick it up at somewhere like Harbor Freight). Simply take out a Molex and put the red lead on the yellow wire and the black lead on the balck wire. If it reports something different than what the program reports it is just a bad sensor.
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