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Strangely High IRQ for network card


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#1
Kyomi

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Not sure if this should go in the hardware forum but here goes :)

I've been having problems with high latency (around 400-6000ms at times, normally about 100-200ms) in World of Warcraft.
I'm pretty sure it's a problem in the connection between here and their servers; I've done a tracert and all the connections
have been <30ms until it gets to an att server and jumps up to 100ms. The normal internet seems to be just fine and the
speed it's supposed to be.

I've tried:

Rebooting the router
Rebooting the PC
Rebooting modem, contacting ISP
The support site for networking at worldofwarcraft.com
Networking tweaks

After a bit of upgrading drivers I found very odd. It lists NVIDIA nForce Networking Controller on IRQ 4294967294.

I've never seen that before.. I know that can't be good, is it because of IPv4 and IPv6 is running at the same time?
If not, is it safe to change it to a lower number? If so, how?

Thanks :)
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#2
Neil Jones

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This is apparently normal behaviour, the high IRQ figure.
Under Vista and later version of Windows, IRQs are virtual, which has the upshot you can have as many as you need and don't have to cram millions of devices into 16 physical IRQs as is the case under Windows XP - each one gets its own IRQ number. Technically it still goes through one of 16 though. Virtual IRQs have been around for years, when numbers from 17-25 started appearing.

If it's not broken and it's working, I'd leave it be. If it's happy to sit on IRQ 4294967294, then let it sit on IRQ 4294967294.

The latency figures may not be anything you can do about or your provider can do anything about - especially if they're occurring on a server somewhere else down the chain. Internet traffic and congestion is the most common cause, and Internet traffic congestion is exactly the same principle that happens when there's a bottleneck on the motorway - traffic jam!
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#3
Kyomi

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Thanks for the reply... I have another question though :)

Is it bad to have alot of devices on the same IRQ? Looking through there is the sound card, video card and one of the networking cards all on the same IRQ.

Going from the "if it's not broke, don't fix it" scenario everything is fine... but I'm just wondering if I could get a bit more 'power' out of them if I was able to somehow
separate them out.
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#4
Neil Jones

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It's usual to have many devices sharing the same IRQs - this is how computers coped before virtual IRQs became the norm.
You'll be hard pushed to separate them out since you'll have way more than 16 devices, but usually the way they've been assigned is deliberate on the basis they won't all fight for attention at the same time. Modern day computers are so fast now anyway that even when they do all fight for attention you rarely notice it. So in a way it doesn't really matter and again, while it's happy, don't worry about it.
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