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New build - Advise?


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#1
xrom

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Hey. I'm looking to buy a new PC and jst need a little advise. Ive got £600 to spend and so far i have...

Case - Antec 300

GFX - XFX 9800GTX+ Black Edition 512MB

HDD - Maxtor 500GB SATAII

RAM - OCZ 4GB DDR2 800MHz/PC6400

Mobo - Gigabyte GA-MA790X-DS4

PSU - OCZ Stealth XStream 700W PSU

CPU - AMD Athlon 64 X2 6000 3.1GHz

So my question is, do you think there are any better options?

Thanks in advanced.

Edited by xrom, 11 January 2009 - 09:12 PM.

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#2
kamille316

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Hi xrom, welcome to Geeks To Go!

Can you tell us which store you're going to buy your parts from?

There's a few things I'll change like the hard drive. Also, switching to Intel set-up for a better performance however if you're thinking of upgrading your CPU in the future then AMD is the right way :)

Kamille
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#3
xrom

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Hey, thanks for the welcome!

I'll be buying my parts from ebuyer.co.uk and i picked AMD because if i do upgrade then i dont need to buy new bits.

What hard drive would you recommend?

Thanks for your help.
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#4
TM_Skylark

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Pick Your Hard Drive in Three Easy Steps

Step 1: Determine Space Needed

Hard drive technology has come a long way in terms of the amount of space available on a single drive. The largest drives available for home use today can store as much as 1 T (1000 GB) on a single drive.

An important consideration to make is how much space you actually need. Though it can be enticing to purchase an entire terabyte of space, know that you will pay a premium for the extra space. Many home users, myself included, have trouble filling even 250 GB with random assortments of files.

For your reference, 100 GB is roughly enough space to store:

* 400,000 Twenty Page Documents OR
* 17,000 Songs OR
* 17,000 10 Megapixel Camera Photos OR
* 52 Two Hour Long Movies

Step 2: Determine Speed Needed

Inside a hard drive is a magnetic platter which stores all of the information. A major determining factor in how fast a hard drive operates is the rate at which the magnetic platter spins. The speed is rated in RPM or revolutions per minute.

The industry standard in most hard drives today is 7200 RPM. If you don’t know, chances are that the hard drive in the computer you’re using to read this is running at a speed of either 7200 RPM or 5400 RPM, a slower more outdated standard.

Hard Drive manufacturer Western Digital has made the only hard drives which run at a faster 10,000 RPM available for home use via their Raptor and VelociRaptor lines. These faster hard drives will make your computer feel faster due to more rapid loading of any application.

However, you will pay a large premium for the special Raptor or VelociRaptor hard drives. Even a Raptor with relatively little space can run a user as much as 100 dollars.

Also, make sure that your hard drive uses the industry standard SATA interface. Whether it uses SATA 1 (1.5 GB/s) or SATA 2 (3.0 GB/s) does not matter – both will run at the same speed in any home computer and are compatible with one another.

Step 3: Determine Number of Drives Needed

Today hard drives are large enough such that one large hard drive is all the home user should require in a computer.

There are three types of people who should consider using more than one drive:

* Professional Photographers or Movie Editors who know that they’ll need more than 1 Terabyte of space.
* People who can’t afford large Raptors but still want the benefits of having a 10,000 RPM hard drive.
* People who want to run their hard drives in RAID.

For those who feel that they cannot afford a fast hard drive but still want the benefits of a 10,000 RPM hard drive can simply purchase a small but fast hard drive along with a large and slower hard drive. All documents and pictures go on the slower hard drive whereas the operating system and games are stored on the fast hard drive. By doing this, you save money while still having a speedy system.

To those who want to put their system into RAID – I highly suggest that you do not. There are three types of RAID which allow you to effectively merge separate hard drive together, conferring a benefit to the user.

If you don’t know anything about RAID, skip to the next section – this next part is to offer my opinions concerning RAID setups.

Many people will want to run their hard drives in RAID 0 in the hopes that it will speed up their computing. And though benchmarks seem to support the fact that RAID 0 is faster than a 10,000 RPM hard drive, realize that in an actual desktop environment the performance gains are quite minimal.

Those who want to run in RAID 1 for the added security should realize that RAID 1 does not protect you from viruses, crashes, etc. RAID 1 is merely used to protect your data in the event that your hard drive fails. However you should be backing up highly sensitive data on an external hard drive in the event of a Trojan or virus forcing a reformat in the first place.

My Suggestions:

If you have decided to run a 7200 RPM standard hard drive, look into the Seagate Barracuda line of hard drives which tend to run faster than their 7200 RPM counterparts. Western Digital also makes excellent drives, but are generally a tad bit slower than their Seagate counterparts (Raptor excluded)

For a 10000 RPM hard drive, you’ll be forced to purchase a Western Digital Raptor or VelociRaptor as Western Digital is the only manufacturer to release higher RPM hard drives for home use.

Edited by TM_Skylark, 14 January 2009 - 11:17 AM.

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#5
kamille316

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Hi xrom,

I recommend you get this Seagate 500GB for £43.49, I don't trust Maxtor (even if they're owned by Seagate now) because in the past, they have the highest failure rate. It may not be the case anymore but its better safe than sorry.

Maybe change the power supply to this Corsair 650W as its a better build than OCZ.

You're not really saving any money with these suggestions but they are a much better build and performs much better.

Do you already have a DVD-writer and an OS with this build?

Thanks,
Kamille

Edited by kamille316, 14 January 2009 - 11:49 AM.

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#6
TM_Skylark

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I would like to very respectfully disagree, according to the EggXpert Power Supply Tier List, updated from the authoritative XtremeSystems Power Supply Tier List, Corsair is no better when it comes to PSUs than OCZ - and OCZ is better than Corsair when it comes to the EliteXStream power supply unit.

For your convenience, I have posted the top two tiers here:

Source (EggXpert): http://www.eggxpert....ead/323050.aspx

Source (XtremeSystems):http://www.xtremesys...ad.php?t=108088

Tier 1 Brands - The Most Powerful And Stable Components On The Market
Antec Signature
Enermax Galaxy
OCZ EliteXStream
PCP&C TurboCool
PCP&C Silencer >610
Silverstone ZF (Etasis 85/75/56)
Seventeam ST >600 (SSI, V2.91)
Silverstone OP/DA >700W
Silverstone ZM
Ultra X3 >1000W
Zippy/Emacs SSL
Zippy/Emacs GSM
Zippy/Emacs PSL
Zippy/Emacs HG2
Zippy/Emacs HP2

Tier 2 Brands - Top Quality components With Top Notch Stability - For Those With Price/Availability Issues With Tier 1
Antec Neo HE
Antec EarthWatts
Antec TruePower Trio
Antec TruePower Quattro
Akasa PowerGreen 80+
BFG ES
CoolMax CTG-750W/850W/1KW
Cooler Master Real Power Pro >800W
Cooler Master Ultimate/UCP
Cooltek CT
Corsair HX
Corsair VX
Corsair TX
Enermax Liberty
Enermax Infiniti
Enhance ENP-GH
Fortron (FSP) GLN
Hiper Type-M >650W
Hiper Type-R >650W
iStarUSA PD2
iStarUSA PD3
OCZ GameXStream <1000W (only if manufactured in December 2007 or later)
OCZ StealthXStream (only if manufactured in December 2007 or later)
OCZ EvoStream
OCZ ProXStream
PCP&C Silencer <610
Seasonic S12
Seasonic M12
Seasonic Energy Plus
SevenTeam ST <600
Silverstone EF
Silverstone OP/DA <700W
Supermicro/AbleCom
Thermaltake Toughpower >600W
Xclio GreatPower
Xclio StablePower
Xigmatek MC
Xigmatek HC
Ultra X3
Ultra X-Pro
Zalman ZM <1000watt

Edited by TM_Skylark, 14 January 2009 - 12:06 PM.

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#7
stettybet0

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How do you manage to deem the XS thread "authoritative"? It seems as though the thread hasn't been updated in over two years, and there is no mention as to how the original poster came to decide which PSUs went where. The EggXpert guide is only very slightly modified.

Reviews consistantly rate Corsair very highly, and I'd recommend them as a top choice any day.
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#8
xrom

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Hey sorry for the late reply ive been away.

Sooo i changed my mind on my build and now im thinking about going for this...

Antec 300 Three Hundred Case

Seagate ST3500320AS 500GB Hard Drive SATA II 7200rpm *32MB Cache* - OEM

OCZ 4GB (2x2GB) DDR2 800Mhz/PC2-6400 GOLD XTC Memory Kit CL5(5-5-5-18) x2

MSI K9A2 Platinum 790FX Socket AM2+ 8 channel audio ATX Motherboard

AMD Athlon 64 X2 6400+ (3.2 GHz) Socket AM2 L2 2MB (2x1MB) Retail Boxed Processor

XFX 9800GT 625MHz 512MB DDR3 Dual DVI HDTV Out PCI-E Graphics Card X2 - SLI ( or would XFX 260GTX Black Edition 896MB DDR3 Dual DVI HDCP HDTV out PhysX and Cuda ready PCI-E Graphics Card X1 be better?)

So i guess my main question is, would 2 9800GTs be better than 1 260GTX? If so what sort of PSU am i going to need?

Thanks!
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#9
jrm20

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Hey sorry for the late reply ive been away.

Sooo i changed my mind on my build and now im thinking about going for this...

Antec 300 Three Hundred Case

Seagate ST3500320AS 500GB Hard Drive SATA II 7200rpm *32MB Cache* - OEM

OCZ 4GB (2x2GB) DDR2 800Mhz/PC2-6400 GOLD XTC Memory Kit CL5(5-5-5-18) x2

MSI K9A2 Platinum 790FX Socket AM2+ 8 channel audio ATX Motherboard

AMD Athlon 64 X2 6400+ (3.2 GHz) Socket AM2 L2 2MB (2x1MB) Retail Boxed Processor

XFX 9800GT 625MHz 512MB DDR3 Dual DVI HDTV Out PCI-E Graphics Card X2 - SLI ( or would XFX 260GTX Black Edition 896MB DDR3 Dual DVI HDCP HDTV out PhysX and Cuda ready PCI-E Graphics Card X1 be better?)

So i guess my main question is, would 2 9800GTs be better than 1 260GTX? If so what sort of PSU am i going to need?

Thanks!



Pretty nice build overall, I would go for 1 of the gtx 260's but make sure you get the one with the 216 processing cores for the stream processors. The older and slower model is the 192 processing cores. The funny thing is they are about the same price.. It is kinda like the performance difference between the first 8800gts models vs the newer 8800gts (G92) was. The performance difference is quite good.

Get this one..http://www.newegg.co...N82E16814130400
It is $259 after rebates, you cannot beat it for the performance. The new gtx260 version with the 216 core shaders will keep up with if not pretty close to the gtx280 in certain games. Look for benchmarks on google and you will be happy with the results..
The cheapest 9800gt's I saw were the zotac's for ($92 after you get the rebate).
I would stick with the single unit gtx 260 but hey its your money go and look at some benchmarks if you want the nitty gritty.


OCZ is fine really as I have the 700w version. The 500W model is the one that wasn't the greatest and the people who heard of that might have bad thoughts on all OCZ stuff which does not make sense at all. OCZ power supplies are based off of the FSP units. I know the ocz 700W and above units are solid though I know because I have one.

good luck!


*EDIT*
sry about the wrong card link earlier LOL. I made a mistake and need some sleep.

Edited by jrm20, 17 January 2009 - 08:05 PM.

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#10
xrom

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Ok i'll do that!

Thanks for the help guys. :)
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#11
jrm20

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Ok i'll do that!

Thanks for the help guys. :)



Make sure you refresh the page. I edited the post.

You need to get this card as it has the new 216 shaders.. http://www.newegg.co...N82E16814130400

OR get this one for the same price and you don't have to worry about rebates.
The only thing is that this version is not already factory overclocked not a biggie.
http://www.newegg.co...N82E16814150329


This is the better card anyway you look at it though. The gtx260 has a physx built into the die.
physx meaning a physics engine.

look on wikipedia if you want more info.

Edited by jrm20, 17 January 2009 - 07:59 PM.

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