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RAM Upgrading Help, please


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#1
Cabranth

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:) Howdy,

I'm about to upgrade the RAM in my HP a1620n, and I can't seem to find the answers I'm looking for on-line. I've used the Crucial Scanner and figured out what I can upgrade to (my manufacturer's product specs were equivocal on maximum RAM), and I just need to know a couple more things.

I'm currently thinking about buying 2x1G sticks and upgrading to 3G total (2x512M + 2x1G).

The Crucial Scanner said I need RAM that supports PC2-5300 speed, but the HP a1620n specs list the RAM compatibilty as PC2-4200 speed. Will the newer RAM conflict with the old RAM?

I know absolutely nothing about RAM specs like Latency, Timing, etc. Does any of that matter to performance?

Are there any brands of RAM that I should avoid?
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#2
jrm20

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:) Howdy,

I'm about to upgrade the RAM in my HP a1620n, and I can't seem to find the answers I'm looking for on-line. I've used the Crucial Scanner and figured out what I can upgrade to (my manufacturer's product specs were equivocal on maximum RAM), and I just need to know a couple more things.

I'm currently thinking about buying 2x1G sticks and upgrading to 3G total (2x512M + 2x1G).

The Crucial Scanner said I need RAM that supports PC2-5300 speed, but the HP a1620n specs list the RAM compatibilty as PC2-4200 speed. Will the newer RAM conflict with the old RAM?

I know absolutely nothing about RAM specs like Latency, Timing, etc. Does any of that matter to performance?

Are there any brands of RAM that I should avoid?



If you are going to reuse the old memory which is fine and I would then you will want to get the same speed of ddr2. Stay with the PC2 4200 ram speed as if you get the faster speed ram it will automatically throttle down to match the slow memory's speed so there is no point in doing that.. SOME manufactured pc's are PICKY and do not like that so I suggest staying with the same that is already in it.

Go for the PC2 4200!

Try buying from a site like newegg.com it might be cheaper..

The timings etc will not matter on your pc at all. All ddr2 timings are fine. Only if you are a hardcore gamer with a Kick-@ss pc and you wanted THE BEST then you would want to go for the lower latency. Its not really noticeable with the human eyes anyway.
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#3
Cabranth

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:) Thanks for the reply, jrm20.

Ok, so even if you have 2 different speed RAM sticks that are perfectly compatible, the PC will slow down the faster one to match the slowest speed? Alrighty, that's an extremely helpful tidbit. I'll remember it in the future.

I've already checked out newegg, and that was where I started seeing the things like Latency and Timing that made me curious, as well as all the different brand names. When I recieved advice from here a long time ago about a Power Supply, I was given a list of about a half-dozen brands that were good, and one brand that I was told to avoid at all costs. That's why I was wondering about that.

Anyhoo, thanks for the help! I think I'll be going with this package.
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#4
TM_Skylark

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This is mostly unnecessary information, but if you wanted to know, here it is:

The motherboard has several clocks, all of which emit electronic pulses from time to time. These pulses coordinate actions of the computer so that they work efficiently.

The clock for the CPU and RAM are dependent on each other. The exact ratio of speeds between CPU:RAM is usually defaulted to 1:1 but in some motherboards it can be unlocked to higher ratios.

The point is that the RAM's memory bus will slow down to match the CPU's front side bus. Thus RAM isn't actually slowing down to the slowest RAM speed. Rather, all RAM is slowing down to match the CPU's FSB speed.
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