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MAC Address Cloning


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#1
MgmXT

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I don't really understand what MAC Address Cloning is, as it is an option on my routers. I have been trying to read up about it on various websites over the internet, and from what I understand it is an address that your computer has, that your ISP communicates with to allow you access to the internet, is this right? I also noticed that when I cloned my MAC Address that it changed my personal IP on this computer (as I am connected to a router network). Will cloning my MAC Address effect my network settings in any way? Also, I read that you can only clone your MAC Address once, BUT apparently you can change your MAC address if you play around with the registry. So, if I were to change my MAC Address would that change my IP to this computer? OR if I changed my MAC Address and THEN cloned it, would it give me a totally different IP to this computer (different from the IP that i currently have, and different to the IP address I have using MAC Address Cloning)? I'm just curious to know if this is like a small loop hole to changing your IP address multiple times.

Edited by MgmXT, 15 January 2009 - 06:42 AM.

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#2
Dan

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Hey MgmXT,

Any particular reason why you want to change your IP?

A MAC address is simply a physical address assigned to hardware devices; your modem would have one, your router has one, your NIC has one etc. There is no way to change your MAC address, although a piece of hardware's software can emulate a certain MAC address -- called cloning, which is what you already know.

As to your IP being changed, since you are within a network, are you referring to your internal IP? (i.e. a 192.168.x.x address) -- or your external IP, for example the IP that displays on sites like whatismyip.com? If it's only your internal IP being changed, this won't effect what you do on the Internet.

Whether or not your external IP would be changed would depend on how your ISP operates; some ISP's use your modem's MAC address, others use your router, and sometimes they may even use your computers MAC address as well. If your ISP uses your modem's MAC address to assign your network IP's, then changing it's MAC address may result in them canceling your service. Other ISP's simply have you log in with a username/password, and assign IP's based on your account.

The option that you have within your router is usually used so that, if you buy a new router, and it's MAC address does not match your previous router's MAC address, then you could clone the old address, so that your ISP would continue to provide you with its Internet service. This is, of course, assuming that your ISP uses your router's MAC address to determine whether or not to provide you with an IP.

So, I'm curious; is it your external IP that is changing, or your internal IP? Depending on your ISP's policy's, they may not care if your hardware appears to keep on changing; or they may care. Contact your ISP for further information.

OR if I changed my MAC Address and THEN cloned it, would it give me a totally different IP to this computer (different from the IP that i currently have, and different to the IP address I have using MAC Address Cloning)?

I'm really not too sure of your sources on this; I have a feeling that what you describe as "changing your MAC Address" is actually cloning it -- so then you can't exactly clone it again. I could be wrong, but it doesn't really make a whole lot of sense to me.

- Dan
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#3
MgmXT

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No, apparently through rededt32 or some progam you can run (similar to regedit), you can view your PC's MAC Address and edit it so that it changes. I was wondering if changing this and then cloning your new MAC Address again would give you another IP Address different to the one I currently have AND different to the IP Address that I currently recieve when I clone my current MAC Address? Also to answer the first part, my internal IP address is changing when I clone my MAC Address. I checked with www.whatismyip.com.

Edited by MgmXT, 15 January 2009 - 11:28 PM.

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#4
Dan

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No, apparently through rededt32 or some progam you can run (similar to regedit), you can view your PC's MAC Address and edit it so that it changes.

By "PC's MAC Address", do you mean your Network Interface Card's (NIC) MAC address? Because that's what communicates with your network..

Also to answer the first part, my internal IP address is changing when I clone my MAC Address. I checked with www.whatismyip.com.

If this whole process is only changing your internal IP, I ask once again -- why do you want to do this? Because you could achieve the same results, with far less difficulty, by simply setting up a static IP. I could possibly see some use in doing it to change your external IP (i.e. circumventing forum bans, game bans etc.), but changing your internal IP really won't achieve anything.

If all you're doing is changing your NIC's MAC address, then your router would detect that a "new device" is attempting to connect to the network, and thus assign it the next IP available in its' IP pool.

Perhaps if you could explain what exactly you're trying to achieve, then I could be of further assistance.

- Dan
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#5
MgmXT

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sorry i meant to say it's changing your external, i mixed the 2 up, my bad, which therefore accomplish working around bans and IP restrictions, etc.
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#6
Dan

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Well, IP bans and restrictions are usually there for a reason, so I am afraid that we will be unable to help you circumvent them.

If you do choose to go forward with this, I would like to give you a small heads up and say that ISP's generally assign IP's in a certain fashion for a reason, and can discontinue your service if you're breaking their policies. Sometimes, they won't care, other times, it's a big deal. So, I hope that whatever forum/game ban/restriction you're trying to circumvent is worth it.

- Dan
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#7
MgmXT

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ah ok, i was just curious to know, but thanks for the heads-up. You can close this thread now.
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