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Small office network with a westell 327w modem/router


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#1
Br4estsr

Br4estsr

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OK let start with hardware. I have 6 desktops and 1 laptop all running XP

A Verizon DSL Westell 327w modem/router, a D-Link 1310 wireless router, Linksys EtherFast Workgroup Switch

The westell has 4 ports and the wireless is shut off, I have 2 desktops the D-Link and the Linksys all connected to the westell.

1 desktop wired to the D-Link and the Laptop and 1 desktop using the wireless on the D-Link.

2 desktops on the linksys switch.

3 printers ,, 1 on a desktop that is wired to the westell, 1 on a desktop that is wireless on the d-link and 1 on a desktop on the linksys switch.

I have file and printer sharing turned on and my wireless secured.

Every thing has internet access with no problems.

Each subnet see's all machines on that subnet and can share files and printer.

How do I share files or printers between the subnets. IE- the D-link subnet beable to share with the Linksys subnet or the desktops that ae wired to the westell.

I hope i made it clear enough to be able to see what i am wanting to do with what i have set up

Thank you
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#2
Dan

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Hey Br4estsr,

Is there any reason why you need the computers to be on different subnets? Sharing files between different subnets is a huge hassle, and usually ends up costing $$$. My advice would be to configure your "secondary" routers to be clients (i.e. act like switches), and let your main router handle the DHCP side of things.

Let me know what you think.
- Dan
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#3
Br4estsr

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I realy don't need the subnets that is just how every thing is set up currently and I am not sure what is the best way to go from here or how to go from here with out spending a wad of cash.

I realy don't care what the configuration is as long as I can share amoungst every thing.

Thank you
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#4
Dan

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In theory, setting up your "secondary" routers to act as switches is pretty straight-forward. Just as a quick question, I see you already have a switch, in the form of your Linksys EtherFast Workgroup Switch -- I assume the machines connected via this device are all on the same subnet as the Westell-connected machines? If they are, then please continue; if not, let me know before you try the steps below.

First of all, you will need to login to your Westell 327w modem/router's web interface. Once logged in, look for a section listing your LAN settings, usually this section is called LAN Settings -- surprisingly. However, it may be under a different name -- look for an area with your DHCP settings, etc. Under the LAN settings, note down the modem/router's internal IP Address, e.g. 192.168.1.1 and it's Subnet Mask. Also, you should see a section referring to your (DHCP) IP Pool (i.e. starting address to end address). Normally, this will be 192.168.1.2 to 192.168.1.100. Finally, make sure DHCP is turned on (usually called DHCP Server).

Once you have that information, login to your D-Link router's web interface page, and go to it's LAN Settings section. In this section, you will need to manually set it's IP Address and Subnet Mask (I suggest that you make a note of any settings that you change, so that you can revert back if something goes wrong). If your Westell's IP Address was 192.168.1.1, a good IP for your D-Link would be 192.168.1.254. In your D-Link, ensure that DHCP Server is turned Off and that your Subnet Mask matches your Westell.

If you renew your connection on the machines connected to the D-Link, they should now be assigned IP's in the range of 192.168.1.x, and be within the same subnet; are they?

- Dan
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