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#16
nizzor

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well wasnt that meticulous. anyways, i think the pins tested out fine ([bleep], its getting annoying trying to find this prob) my results weren't too accurate tho but i had a general idea. my AM only has 50V as the closest range to 20 so it was kinda arduous to determine the reading.

reds were apprx +5.6V
orange were apprx +3V
yellow were apprx +13V (tested under 50V so i think the device rounded up)
purple was apprx +5V

the negative ones were the problem since this thing doesnt hit negative lol, at least i think, but the blue pins made the needle go further back than the white pins so that's a good sign? :S

there's also a grey pin dunno what to expect from that but it read .01 or something (the needle moved very slightly)

well i think these readings are positive.. so where to next?

PS - dunno if this is relevant but first two runs the PSU shut down on me after a few minutes and wudnt turn on again (i didnt even move or touch the paper clip). the third run it stayed on.
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#17
Samm

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Think I may have found the problem.
Firstly, I must apologise - I completely forgot to mention the grey wire and it's the most important one of all!
The grey is the Power Good signal. It is this that gives the signal to the mobo to power up after the PSU levels have stabilised (different from the power on signal). This wire should be giving out 5V. If this falls below 1V, the board will not power up.
Whats more, if there is a glitch or surge in power at any point, the 'power good' wire will also cause the system to shut down & often won't reset (power on again) for about 15 secs.

If you were experiencing problems with keeping the psu powered on, then it would suggest that there is some sort of problem with the output voltage stabilty.

Can you test the PSU one more time for me, but only test the grey wire this time don't worry about the others. (still connect black probe to black wire obviously)
Also, before you switch the PSU on using the paperclip, can you connect one of the molex power connectors to a CDROM drive for me. This will provide a small but constant load on the PSU (it's complicated but trust me on this!)

BTW the readings you have given me so far are fine. Don't worry about the negative ones for now, they are mostly obsolete anyway. The only one that did sound suspicious was the grey.
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#18
nizzor

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blah again it passed the test i think, it hit +5V with the CDROM connected. i was about to retest without CDROM but the PSU died on me again (had to wait for a minute or so). is there anything wrong with turning it off using the switch at the back or something?

anyways, test without CDROM still showed 0.1V while with showed 5V.
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#19
Samm

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blah again it passed the test i think, it hit +5V with the CDROM connected. i was about to retest without CDROM but the PSU died on me again (had to wait for a minute or so). is there anything wrong with turning it off using the switch at the back or something?

anyways, test without CDROM still showed 0.1V while with showed 5V.

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No, theres nothing wrong with turning the PSU off using the switch on the back.
As I explained in my last post, the PSU will turn itself off if the voltage on the grey wire isn't constant or drops below a certain level. I have gone through all the PSU tests with you that I can, without having the PSU in front of me.

I think, given that the PSU is constantly switching off, indicating a power stability problem inside the PSU itself, you therefore need to replace it. I personally wouldn't risk using it on a computer.

Sorry I haven't been able to tell you that the PSU is working fine & saved you from having to buy a new one, but at least you now know it is definately dodgy & needs replacing!

Samm
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