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What Will The World Be Like In 100 Years?


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#1
superstar

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I'm amazed at what we've accomplished in our lifetime. I actually think about it a lot... Even though many of our creations, or ways of life we go about, have been in process for centuries. For example the discovery of fire long ago lead to the quest for permanent means of light, which eventually lead to the light bulb.

On the other hand we have technology. Such great inventions as the tv, car, i pod, electric guitar, gaming consoles, personal computer, etc. What kind of technology do you think we'll have? Will we run out of gas? What would be the alternative? Or will electric cars finally popularize themselves in this ever changing world? A lot of the "big wigs" seem to try and stop CHANGE because of their greed. How will we combat climate change, or will it do it's course with us? Or what about the small things which are still so very important, yet used routinely in our everyday lives? Gaming systems would probably look as close to life like as you can imagine. Most cinematography already looks real in movies... The beginning of something else? The radios pretty much back in the car nowadays, while the tv is being replaced by the pc. But what of that? The death of the pc??? Sure pcs will still be around just like the radio is still on your i pod but nobody uses it. Vinyl became>8 trak>cassette>disc. Some of our inventions take a back seat as time goes by. It's interesting to speak of computers because if they are still very popular in the future what would the components be made of or look like? There is plenty of technology that can be created...

Share your practical ideas.

I say 100 years because that's around the corner. To say 1000 would leave too much room for fantasy and wishful thinking.

Edited by BHowett, 18 March 2009 - 12:18 PM.

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#2
BHowett

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Not a bad topic when your talking about “What Kind Of Technology Do You Expect” in the next 100 years, but due to their volatile and sensitive nature, we will not allow discussions related to abortion, religion, politics, sex, etc... etc.. Posts that don't meet these guidelines may be edited or deleted at the moderator's discretion as they are not permitted and it states in our Terms of Use. So I have edited your first paragraph.

Enjoy the topic, but please keep things according to our TOU.
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#3
stettybet0

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You are thinking on too small a scale. We will not have PCs, we will be PCs. An interesting read for you would be The Singularity is Near by Raymond Kurzweil. In 1987, Kurzweil wrote The Age of Intelligent Machines, which, among other things, made many predictions that have since come true that seemed crazy at the time (for example, that a computer would beat a human chess champion) based on his Law of Accelerating Returns. The Law states that technological progress occurs exponentially instead of linearly, meaning that each new advancement enables several higher advancements instead of just one higher advancement, and concordantly, every year, more useful inventions and discoveries are made than were made in the last.

The Law of Accelerating Returns has a very important consequence in that extrapolation of exponentially improving technology trends into the future suggests, by Kurzweil's analysis, that highly advanced technologies will arrive far sooner than linear-thinking people assume. The creation of the modern Internet and the completion of the Human Genome Project are prominent examples illustrative of this point. Both were multi-year projects that relied on computer technology to reach completion. In both cases, critics derided them as hopeless since, in the beginning, both relied on computers that would have taken decades to process all of the necessary data. However, these critics had failed to take into account the exponentially improving nature of computer processing speeds and price-performance, and thus failed to see that, within a few years, the two projects would have access to vastly superior computers that would drastically shorten their timelines for completion.

Kurzweil understands that a linear view of historical progress and of anticipated future change is instinctive to the average human mind, but insists that it is wrong.

In The Singularity is Near, Kurzweil makes predictions about the 21st century, saying, "An analysis of the history of technology shows that technological change is exponential, contrary to the common-sense 'intuitive linear' view. So we won't experience 100 years of progress in the 21st century—it will be more like 20,000 years of progress (at today's rate)."

You can read all of Kurzweil's predictions here, but the most important one is that we will reach a technological singularity in around 2045.

Kurzweil says The Singularity occurs as artificial intelligences surpass human beings as the smartest and most capable life forms on the Earth. Technological development is taken over by the machines, who can think, act and communicate so quickly that normal humans cannot even comprehend what is going on; thus the machines, acting in concert with those humans who have evolved into humanoid androids, achieve effective world domination. The machines enter into a "runaway reaction" of self-improvement cycles, with each new generation of A.I.s appearing faster and faster. From this point onwards, technological advancement is explosive, under the control of the machines, and thus cannot be accurately predicted. The Singularity is an extremely disruptive, world-altering event that forever changes the course of human history. The extermination of humanity by violent machines is unlikely (though not impossible) because sharp distinctions between man and machine will no longer exist thanks to the existence of cybernetically enhanced humans and uploaded humans.

Whether or not Korzweil is exactly accurate in all of his predictions, it seems almost certain that the world 100 years from now will be nothing like it is today.

Edited by stettybet0, 18 March 2009 - 03:24 PM.

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#4
sarahw

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Well, it's 2009, what I want to know is, where are my flying cars?
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#5
Anthony19

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i want my flying truck...

I would not like to think of the horrific accidents though...

definitely need some kind of auto cruise control

that actually takes control, detects objects , at a distance far enough to make the re-action and prevent collisions..

wouldn't it be nice... hope i am not fantasizing too much lol

Anthony19

i think in 100 years... we may have ourselves a vehicle that runs on water / air and that the everyday person can afford to buy ( i know its already been done, but greed has abandoned the forward development... )

once released... couple years later ... like anything the price will come down to the point where the everyday person can afford one...

PS: Excellent topic :)
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#6
stettybet0

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Anthony, you aren't fantasizing too much, you are realizing too little. While the technology will certainly be there, we won't have flying cars in the future because cars and other forms of physical transportation will be obsolete.

It is natural for a human to think of technological progress as a linear one. After, all if you look at a small section of an exponential graph, it looks linear. And since the average human lives about 70 years, and maybe looks into the past technological advancements of the prior 30 years, they only have a 100 year section of the 200,000 year human history. But think about it. In the first 100,000 years of human existence, what technological progress did we make? We discovered fire and maybe fashioned a spear. Now consider the last 70 years. The world as we know it today is fundamentally different than it was during World War II. Just think of all of the inventions that have been made since then. This trend corresponds with an exponential one, as an exponential growth starts out very slow, and very gradually gets faster until a point where the growth explodes at an incredible pace. (See graph) We are nearing that point. As Kurzweil says, in the next 100 years we will have 20,000 years of technological progress (at today's rate). So, if you want to think in linear terms, imagine that the title of this topic is "What will the world be like in 20,000 years?".

Edited by stettybet0, 19 March 2009 - 01:10 PM.

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#7
Ferrari

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Take a look at this video my sister sent me. Some of the things it says is unimaginable, kind of like what stettybet0 is saying.

Did you know?
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#8
Anthony19

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thank you Ferrari for that link !

I see now what you are all talking about lol

PS: stettybet0 , thank you also for the links !

I did not have time earlier to read them ( was working ) , but just knocked off and checked them out...

PSS( To everyone ) : I advise you all to check the links out ( well worth the read if you have a few minutes )
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#9
Ferrari

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No problem Anthony,

I saw what stettybet0 was saying and I thought to myself, I know a video that pretty much says the same thing, but you get to watch, not read LOL.

Apparently, that video was showed to Sony Executives in a meeting of some sort.
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#10
stettybet0

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That is a good video Ferrari, though I think some parts are irrelevant (it's meaningless that China and India have a greater population because countries will become obsolete as we become a more globalized society). It was a good idea to link to a video, as obviously not everyone will want to go out and buy the book I recommended. So, here is a video by Kurzweil talking about many of his ideas that he discussed in the book. (I still strongly recommend the book, The Singularity is Near, though!)

And if you have even more time, here is a three part video of a speech Kurzweil gave at Stanford.

Video 1
Video 2
Video 3
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#11
galbatrox9

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its funny u mentioned this question...

well i think in 100 years life wouldnt be nice for humans :) it would be all technology.... all robots and machines of mass destruction. People would be forced by robot police! and people who dont listen would be sent to robot concentration camps!
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#12
Troy

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In 100 years, I think we all will have rid the earth of the horrible pollution. We will live in nice, fresh, country, forestry style mountains and coastlines and fields and stuff.

We will have "upgraded" to have exceptional weaponry for our hunting, including the club, the spear, and the rock. (Bows and arrows will probably be about 200 years away yet).

We will all live in tribes, and have thatched-roof huts for our homes.

Sounds good to me...
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#13
Ferrari

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Say wha?

Repeter s'il vous plait. (Repeat, please.)

Where is Sari, she would be so impressed! I spent a week in Paris, France when I was 19-I learned A LOT.

Oh, and to stay on topic haha, I think technology will advance so much it will cause the future to become even more unpredictable than it is now. In short, I believe exponential growth is real, thus knowing what the future would be like 100 years from now is really unimaginable/unpredictable.

It just goes beyond our current understanding or thinking. For example, lets just assume(keyword assume) other worlds exist that do have the technology to travel faster than the speed of light(or know how to get around it) all at the same time with Silent propulsion. It is just to hard for us to understand or duplicate/create. Imagine that sort of idea applied to everything, even the way we eat, drink, and sleep.
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#14
bustermoves

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unless we get the wake up call soon,i doubt there will be much of a world left to worry about.
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#15
Troy

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Now there's a good point.

Everybody go plant a tree. And walk to work.
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