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Intel SSD, write speed only 110MB/sec


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#16
DragonMaster Jay

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Do you have data striping (similar to RAID0) and interleaving enabled?

These are settings for the drive itself. Do you have firmware or specific software that manages your solid state drive?
Edit: I would suggest a firmware update ASAP!

Was the SSD drive purchased as factory new? Most SSDs degrade over time. This is because of wear leveling and write combining (data combined and stored in a buffer). Also, write fragmentation can be a problem as well.

Another performance issue you possibly have is low power. SSDs require more power than hard disks to operate. What amount of power (in Wattage) are you using?

Edited by DragonMaster Jay, 29 April 2009 - 10:17 AM.

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#17
XPS M2010

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Jay, I would not know how to enable striping and interleaving.
There is no software.
The drive was brand new from Intel, two weeks ago.
I could send you a complete system profile from SIW to your e-mail address if you want, my e-mail address is:
Removed email address
thank you, Bo
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#18
XPS M2010

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Where do you check the power for the SSD?
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#19
DragonMaster Jay

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Have you checked the Intel support database for firmware?

Go in to device manager, and right click on th Intel SSD and click Update Driver. Make sure it searches online.
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#20
XPS M2010

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Intel said there is no special driver for the SSD, the firmware is the newest.
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#21
XPS M2010

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I did the update in the device manager, it says the best driver is already installed.
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#22
DragonMaster Jay

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If you really want this drive to run faster, I would suggest to upgrade the power to the drive.

There is no easy way to check how much power is to the drive. Getting another power module, one that is stronger (for example, your is 550W, so get a 650W to work it instead), should help the drive to get more performance/power!
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#23
XPS M2010

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Jay, I have a laptop.

Edited by XPS M2010, 29 April 2009 - 11:04 AM.

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#24
DragonMaster Jay

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I see. I am not sure if a stronger battery would work.

My flash SSD is at 52MBps read and 32MBps write.

SSD testers are likely to report false information, as background services that write to the drive are not counted in the tests. Foreground is what is tested. What you are trying to write will appear slower in the test because your SSD is constantly writing. Much of the speed of the drive, especially for Vista, is aimed more at writing all of the OS data and services and optimization of program data. The greatest common factor of write speed is how many programs and services are running.

Do not expect a change. Your SSD is running at the speed that it should.

I recommend this SysInternals utility that can monitor file system activity. Process Monitor.

Edited by DragonMaster Jay, 29 April 2009 - 11:21 AM.

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#25
stettybet0

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When certain services are enabled, especially Direct Memory Access, Windows cannot access data when it is moving that fast. Data stream is slowed down so it can be read properly. Saved good data is better than corrupted data. File corruption is not good.

Direct Memory Access is when devices access memory without going through the CPU. It has nothing to do with the speed of hard drive writes. And Windows can access data moving as fast as we can make it move. Why would Windows need to slow a 250MB/s stream to 110MB/s for a hard drive, but it can read a stream from the RAM which is at, say, 6400MB/s (assuming DDR2-800 RAM)?

Do you have the drive connected as primary and as the only drive on the system? Reduced speeds can also occur if multiple internal storage drives are installed.

This is not true. While there is a very slight overhead needed to address each additional drive, the limiting factor is still by far the fact that the drives themselves can only read and write so fast.

Do you have data striping (similar to RAID0) and interleaving enabled?

Data striping is impossible with only one hard drive. RAID0 is a popular implementation of data striping. Interleaving in SSDs is built into the hardware and cannot be disabled.

Another performance issue you possibly have is low power. SSDs require more power than hard disks to operate. What amount of power (in Wattage) are you using?

If you really want this drive to run faster, I would suggest to upgrade the power to the drive.

There is no easy way to check how much power is to the drive. Getting another power module, one that is stronger (for example, your is 550W, so get a 650W to work it instead), should help the drive to get more performance/power!

SSDs, with no moving parts, logically (and actually) require much less power than their mechanical counterparts. Also, increasing power won't give you an increase in performance. An SSD operates with a very consistent power draw. Thus, it either has enough power to operate, or it doesn't. Giving your system an extra 100W would do absolutely nothing for SSD performance.

I see. I am not sure if a stronger battery would work.

A stronger battery would do nothing, for the reasons mentioned above.

My flash SSD is at 52MBps read and 32MBps write.

SSDs have evolved considerably in the past few years, and unless you have the same SSD as XPS M2010 (an Intel X25-M), I'm not sure what the point of this comparison is.

Now, XPS M2010, to answer your question... First of all, I think you are referring to read speed, not write speed. The SSD you have, the Intel X25-M, has a max write speed of 70MB/s. So, if you are getting 110MB/s write speed, you should be overjoyed. The max read speed of your SSD is 250MB/s. The reason that you are getting less than that is most likely due to bottlenecking in the rest of your system. To verify this, you could try putting the SSD in a more powerful system (powerful as in processing power, not wattage...) and see if you get better results.

Edited by stettybet0, 29 April 2009 - 02:24 PM.

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#26
DragonMaster Jay

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Thank you for kind correction of a few details there. I do admit that I am learning still. :)

Part of my research:

Windows is optimized for hard disks, not SSDs. Worth reading, imo.

Read this great article, also.
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#27
XPS M2010

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To stettybet0.
I was referring to the read speed, sorry my mistake.
Thank you for your input. I was thinking that a 2.33GHz Core Duo would be fine. Unfortunately I don't have access to another computer at this time. In case you have any other suggestions I sure would appreciate them.
Thank you, Bo
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