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Can't get video card to run


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#1
Calitechnician

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I just bought a GeForce 8600 GT graphics card. I installed it into my computer, but I got nothing but black. Here are my specs:

Pentium E2200 © 2.2 GHz (65W)
800 MHz front side bus
Socket 775
Chipset
Intel G33 Express
Motherboard
Manufacturer: Asus
Motherboard Name: IPIBL-LB
HP/Compaq motherboard name: Benicia-GL8E
Memory
Component Attributes
Memory Installed 4 GB
Operating System: Windows Vista x64

4 GB* (4 x 1 GB) (32-bit OS)

Speed supported PC2-6400 MB/sec
Type 240 pin, DDR2 SDRAM

Hard drive
500 GB SATA 3G (3.0 Gb/sec)
7200 rpm

Expansion slots
Slot type Quantity
PCI One (None available)
PCI Express x16 One (One available)
PCI Express x1 Two (Two available)

Not sure if it's an issue of compatibility, or just something that I'm missing.
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#2
Digerati

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Did this replace a card?

You did not mention your PSU - what make and model is it? Did you attach the required power lead directly to the card?
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#3
Calitechnician

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This card was replacing my integrated video card, which was just a part of my motherboard. I'm not sure what my psu is, but any additional info can be found here:
http://h10025.www1.h...product=3766893

As for the additional power supply, I don't think this card needs any. Here's more info on the card itself:

GPU/VPU: NVIDIA GeForce 8600 GT


RAMDAC: Dual 400 MHz


Fill Rate per Second: 8.64 Billion pixels


Additional Features: RoHS Compliant
HDTV Ready
SLI Ready
OpenGL 2.0
DirectX 10


Maximum Resolution: 2560 x 1600 (Digital)


Video Memory: 256MB


Memory Type: GDDR3


Memory Interface: 128-bit


Stream Processors: 32


Core Clock: 620 MHz


Memory Clock: 1600 MHz


Shader Clock: 1355 MHz


Memory Bandwidth: 22.4GB/sec.


Interface Type: PCI Express


Interface Speed: x16


Connector(s): Dual DVI (Dual Link)
HDTV/S-Video


Multiple Monitors Support: Yes
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#4
Digerati

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You may need to pop the case and inspect the PSU for a label. Use the eXtreme PSU Calculator Lite to determine your power supply unit (PSU) requirements. Plug in all the hardware you think you might have in 2 or 3 years (extra drives, bigger or 2nd video card, more RAM, etc.). Be sure to read and heed the notes at the bottom of the page. I recommend setting Capacitor Aging to 30%, and if you participate in distributive computing projects (e.g. BOINC or Folding@Home), I recommend setting TDP to 100%. Research your video card and pay particular attention to the power supply requirements for your card listed on your video card maker's website. If not listed, check a comparable card (same graphics engine and RAM) from a different maker. The key specifications, in order of importance are:
  • Current (amperage or amps) on the +12V rail,
  • Efficiency,
  • Total wattage.
Then look for power supply brands listed under the "Good" column of PC Mechanic's PSU Reference List. Ensure the supplied amperage on the +12V rails of your chosen PSU meets the requirements of your video card. Don't try to save a few dollars by getting a cheap supply. Digital electronics, including CPUs, RAM, and today's advanced graphics cards, need clean, stable power. A good, well chosen supply will provide years of service and upgrade wiggle room. I strongly recommend you pick a supply with an efficiency rating equal to, or greater than 80%. Look for the 80 Plus - EnergyStar Compliant label. And don't forget to budget for a good UPS with AVR (automatic voltage regulation).
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#5
Calitechnician

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Figured it out. It was just a user error on my part. Thanks for the help!
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#6
rshaffer61

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Can I ask if you could share the mistake as it may help someone with the same problem.

With that I would like to say:
You are very welcome. I'm glad we could help and please let us know how everything works out for you.
If there is anything else we can do to help please feel free to ask. I appreciate that you allowed me to assist you with your issue and for your patience. Thank you for choosing GeeksToGo for help.
This issue now appears to be resolved.


If other members are reading this and have a similar problem please begin a New Topic and someone will assist you as soon as possible

Edited by rshaffer61, 29 April 2009 - 08:20 AM.

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