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Random shutdown+no restart


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#1
evilgenius39

evilgenius39

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Hello, I am new to this site, and I have a question. My computer shut itself off sometime today, and I can't get it to start again. I've checked the connections between the power supply and the motherboard and the power switch and the motherboard, but neither turned up anything. I've narrowed it down to either the motherboard or the power supply, but I'm not sure which. Could something like this be the product of a faulty motherboard, or is it a fritzy power supply? Oh, and here are the stats:

-AMD Athlon XP 1800+ @1.533 GHz
-MSI K7T266 Pro Motherboard
-512MB PC2100 DDR RAM
-3 Western Digital HDDs (20, 120 and 160 GB, all 7200 rpm, 160 is on a IDE controller card)
-Samsung SD-616F 16x/48x DVD-ROM Drive
-52x CD Burner (can't remember brand)
-ATI Radeon 8500 64MB DDR Graphics Card
-Soundblaster Audigy 2 Soundcard
-425W power supply
-Running Windows 2000 (though this doesn't really matter at the moment)

Thanks in advance.
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#2
Samm

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Yeah it could be either. Could also be the CPU.

When you switch the system on now, does the fan in the PSU turn? Also does the CPU fan spin & are there any LEDS on the motherboard lit up?
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#3
evilgenius39

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Nope, none of that happens. I push the button on the front, and all it does is click. No power-up whatsoever. I even tried switching the buttons on the case (hooking the reset button up to the power switch pins) to see if it was a bad cable, but that didn't do anything either. No LEDs, no fan spinning, nothing.
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#4
Samm

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Not being funny but have you checked the fuse in the power cable?
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#5
evilgenius39

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That is a good question, since it's usually the simple stuff that gets me, but it's not the cable. I've tried a couple of different cables (ones that I know are good) and even different outlets. My roommate is trying to get his hands on a voltage meter so we can test the power supply, so I might be able to rule that one out in a day or two.
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#6
Samm

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Sounds like it is the PSU in that case, usually if it's anything else, such as mobo/CPU/video etc, you would still get some power to the board as the PSU delivers a standby voltage even when the system is turned off, as long as its live at the mains outlet.

If you want to initially check the psu without having to wait for a multimeter, you can. If you try this, you must follow my instructions carefully.

1. Disconnect every connector from the PSU to the computer. (ie ATX 20 power connector to mobo, any other power connections on the mobo, all drives etc). There should be nothing left attached to the PSU.

2. Find a bare metal paperclip or something similar, straighten it out & then bend it into a tight U shape.

3. Connect the PSU to the wall socket & make sure the power switch on the rear of the psu is ON (if there is one).

4.Look at the underside of the 20pin ATX connector on the PSU. There should be only one pin that has a green wire going into it. There will be black wires feeding the neighbouring pins on either side. Insert one end of the paperclip up into the bottom of one of the black pins & insert the other end into the pin with the green wire.

This should start the PSU up - you should be able to hear the PSU's fan spinning. If it doesn't work, then the PSU is dead.
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#7
evilgenius39

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Yep, that must be it then. I tried your method, and all I got was an odd little chirpy noise. No movement from the fan at all. So, I guess a new PSU is in order. Might as well replace the case while I'm at it, since I've been wanting to get a roomier one for a while now. Kill two birds with one stone. Oh, and thanks so much for all of your help. You're a lifesaver!
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#8
Samm

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You're welcome.
Can I make a quick recommendation though? Replace the case by all means but buy a good quality PSU seperately. A lot of PSU's that come with cheaper cases are really bad & may cause you more problems than it's worth.
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#9
evilgenius39

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Duly noted. I'll keep an eye out. Thanks again.
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