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Does Power Supply, supply power? --> Need comments


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#1
SHENGTON

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I need comments for my article. Do you agree what I wrote or not? and Why?



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The term power supply is a bit of a misnomer. Allow me to illustrate my arguments with the following:

Deep Well >> Water Pump >> Pressurized water Tank>>Gate valve >> Pipe >> Faucet

Now, Let the items i.e. water tank, Gate valve, pipe and faucet be a one (1) process called A_unit and let the Water pump be an action or a connector of the two (Deep well & A_Unit).

Now, which of the two units (Deep well and A_unit) supplies/provides water to the household to drink? When I say supplier/provider - that means without it there would be totally no water at all.

From the illustration above, without “A_unit” - Your household would be a mess.

The same with PSU, without PSU - your system will be toasted due to improper voltage supply (a mess in water illustration above) thus, PSU does not supply power but controls and regulates the power supply to avoid the mess.

A PC’s power supply does not actually supply any power. Just as with any electrical appliance, the power for a PC is supplied by the wall socket, which is connected to your local electrical grid., which is supplied electricity by a power company. What the power supply in a PC actually does is act as a step-down transformer. That means that it converts high-voltage alternating current into low-voltage direct current. Generally, a PC uses 12-volt current to power motors on devices like hard drives and CD-ROM drives, and 5-volt and 3.3-volt current to support onboard electronics.

Source (From my Blog site)

Edited by SHENGTON, 03 July 2009 - 08:13 PM.

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#2
Digerati

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I think you made it more confusing. Analogies only work if people know what you are talking about. Who knows what a gate valve is? - Besides a valve and a gate do the same thing - they open and shut to let something through, or hold it back. You have "one (1) process" but no two (2). You have a pump being an "action" or a "connector", and you have an A_Unit but no B_Unit - but you have a Deep well - I know electronic but have no clue what that has to do with a PSU.

You say, PSU does not supply power but controls and regulates the power supply to avoid the mess.

Sorry, but that's clear as mud.

without PSU - your system will be toasted due to improper voltage supply

That is wrong. Without a PSU, you have no power.

PSU does not supply power but controls and regulates the power supply

That is wrong too. First, PSU means "power supply unit". "Regulator circuits" in the PSU control and regulate the power.

A PC’s power supply does not actually supply any power.

What? Of course it does. If the wall supplies power to the power supply, then the power supply provides power to the computer.

No, a power supply does exactly what it's name says it does, it supplies power. Yes it is true computer PSUs use transformers, but transformers do not convert AC to DC, that is done through a rectification process - a part of "supplying power". Your power company does not provide DC power.

My advice - delete the article - it makes no sense. Or would you rather I post that in blog?
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#3
SHENGTON

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Thanks Sir Digerati. I just need your comments about Power Supply if my idea is correct or not. Why I'm posting this here because I'm not really sure if my article is correct. So I need your posts to gather more information to genius people like you guys. I know there are lots of intelligent people here that's why I'm posting it here. Thanks and God bless. :)

Edited by SHENGTON, 04 July 2009 - 03:02 AM.

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#4
Digerati

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I just need your comments about Power Supply if my idea is correct or not.

You asked,

I need comments for my article. Do you agree what I wrote or not? and Why?

First, I am no genius, but I have been around consumer electronics for many years. I don't agree with your article and I said why. Your facts are inaccurate. The analogy does not fit - "normal people" know as much about pipe fitting and water pumps as they do about power supplies and electronics.

I recommend Google and doing some research first, before asking questions - especially like the one in your topic title. You might start with,

http://en.wikipedia....wer_Supply_Unit
http://en.wikipedia....de_power_supply
http://www.webopedia...wer_supply.html

And to learn about the ATX standards that govern PC power supply voltages, connectors, and physical dimensions of all ATX power supplies, cases, and motherboards (that's about 99% of them out there) read the ATX Form Factor Standard.
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