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Faulting RAM or Power Supply?


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#1
dcleas

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I am new to geeks to go but not new to forums so cut me some slack if i break any rules.

I build my current rig last year. I have been pleged with motherboard issues and have had the ASUS board replaced 3 times sense i bought it. Thats just a bit of background. I recently upgraded my antenna for my wireless card. All works well yada yada. But after that I got a nasty virus and reformated. My machine will restart randomly. Sometimes wont even make it past the Windows Xp boot screen. When it does load I get Windows Explorer error messages and "Windows as recovered from a serious problem" messages. I tested the RAM with Memtest last night and all came up good.

I am all out of ideas. Could someone point me in the right direction thanks.
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#2
rshaffer61

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Just to get a ideal of some possible issues try this.

Download Speedfan (The download link is in the first line of the second paragraph), and install it. Once it's installed, run the program and post here the information it shows. The information I want you to post is the stuff that is circled in the example picture I have attached.

Posted Image
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#3
dcleas

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Reply to rshaffer61

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#4
rshaffer61

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Download and install EVEREST
Open it.
1: In left pane expand Computer folder.
2: Click once on Summary
3: In upper menu, go Report
4: And then to Quick Report-Summary
5: Save it in text file, and paste it in your next post.


DO NOT INCLUDE ANYTHING UNDER THE LINE THAT SAYS "DEBUG- PCI"



After that do the following:

Click HD diagnostic in my signature below. Choose the manufacturer of your hd. Download the tool. Running this will tell us if there is a problem with HD itself. If not then we will pursue other hardware or software possibilities
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#5
dcleas

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--------[ EVEREST Home Edition © 2003-2005 Lavalys, Inc. ]------------------------------------------------------------

Version EVEREST v2.20.405
Homepage http://www.lavalys.com/
Report Type Quick Report
Computer ANTEC
Generator Dylan
Operating System Microsoft Windows XP Professional 5.1.2600 (WinXP Retail)
Date 2009-07-09
Time 21:14


--------[ Summary ]-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Computer:
Operating System Microsoft Windows XP Professional
OS Service Pack Service Pack 3
DirectX 4.09.00.0904 (DirectX 9.0c)
Computer Name ANTEC
User Name Dylan

Motherboard:
CPU Type Unknown, 2400 MHz
Motherboard Name Unknown
Motherboard Chipset Unknown
System Memory 2048 MB
BIOS Type Award (10/30/08)
Communication Port Communications Port (COM1)

Display:
Video Adapter NVIDIA GeForce 6200 LE (512 MB)
3D Accelerator nVIDIA NV44
Monitor Plug and Play Monitor [NoDB] (91076CA014118)

Storage:
IDE Controller Standard Dual Channel PCI IDE Controller
IDE Controller Standard Dual Channel PCI IDE Controller
IDE Controller Standard Dual Channel PCI IDE Controller
IDE Controller Standard Dual Channel PCI IDE Controller
Disk Drive ST3160812AS (149 GB, IDE)
Optical Drive ASUS DVD-E616A3T (16x/48x DVD-ROM)
Optical Drive HL-DT-ST DVD-RAM GSA-H54L
SMART Hard Disks Status OK

Partitions:
C: (NTFS) 101002 MB (94800 MB free)

Input:
Keyboard HID Keyboard Device
Keyboard Standard 101/102-Key or Microsoft Natural PS/2 Keyboard
Mouse HID-compliant mouse

Network:
Network Adapter Airlink101 802.11g Wireless Adapter
Network Adapter NVIDIA nForce Networking Controller

Peripherals:
Printer HP Deskjet 3840 Series
Printer HP LaserJet 4L
USB1 Controller Standard OpenHCD USB Host Controller [NoDB]
USB2 Controller Standard Enhanced PCI to USB Host Controller [NoDB]
USB Device Generic USB Hub
USB Device USB Composite Device
USB Device USB Composite Device
USB Device USB Human Interface Device
USB Device USB Human Interface Device
USB Device USB Human Interface Device
USB Device USB Human Interface Device
USB Device USB Printing Support
USB Device USB Printing Support
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#6
dcleas

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Using SeaTools in Dos the hard drive passed the long test as well. whats next?
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#7
rshaffer61

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The goal here is just to test the mobo:


Place the motherboard on a piece of card board larger than the motherboard,

this will eliminate a short from the mobo to the case which could be a possibility

Install the cpu with, 1 stick ram in dimm 1, power supply, case switch and case speaker
Connect ps2 mouse and keyboard along with the monitor
Connect HD

If the computer now boots without the error you most likely had a case short so make sure when installing the motherboard in the case that you use standoffs and they line up with the mounting holes in the motherboard and none of the standoffs touch anything else on the underside of the board.

If this still does not rectify the problem then the PSU should be checked. This will have to be done by a shop unless you have the knowledge to do it.

Have you checked the fans to make sure nothing is stopping them from turning?
Did you apply thermal compound between the cpu and heatsink before installing in the MOBO?

This porblem has been happening since the system was originally built?
The MOBO has been replaced and the system worked fine. You got a virus and formatted.
How did you exactly do the format?
Did you format and the reload windows?
Did you use the win xp genuine cd?
Did you load all the MOBO drivers from the disk that came with the MOBO?
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#8
dcleas

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I did as you said above. When booting the first time I DID get numerous error messages "Windows has recovered from a serious error..." I restarted the machine again to see if it would happen again and it did not.

I am using standoffs. All the fans spin and are clean.

"This problem has been happening since the system was originally built?"
A: Not this problem. When I had the board replaced it was because the front USB shorted the board out.

"The MOBO has been replaced and the system worked fine. You got a virus and formatted."

"How did you exactly do the format?"
A: Windows XP Pro disk. Deleted the partion. Used the disk to do the rest.

"Did you format and the reload windows?"
A: First, I reloaded with Windows. Saw the error wiped the drive again and used Linux 9.04. Saw no error in Linux so I wiped it again and put XP back. That's when I posted here.

"Did you use the win xp genuine cd?"
A: Yes, Windows XP Pro.

"Did you load all the MOBO drivers from the disk that came with the MOBO?"
A: All the drivers for everything came off there respective discs.

I do believe I have the knowledge to check the PSU. How would I go about it?
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#9
rshaffer61

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Let me have Digerati instruct you on that as I am not sure. To double check you can also use the Extreme PSU Calculator to check and make sure it has enough power to supply your system correctly.

Go to
Start and then to Run
Type in Chkdsk /r Not the space between k and /
Click Enter ...It will probably ask if you want to do this on the next reboot...click Y

If the window doesn't shutdown on its own then reboot the system manually. On reboot the system will start the chkdsk operation
This one will take longer then chkdsk /f

Note... there are 5 stages...
It may appear to hang at a certain percent for a hour or more or even back up and go over the same area...this is normal...
DO NOT SHUT YOUR COMPUTER DOWN WHILE CHKDSK IS RUNNING OR YOU CAN HAVE SEVERE PROBLEMS
This can take several hours to complete.
When completed it will boot the system back into windows.

Let me know if this fixes the problem


Download SIW from HERE and get the Standalone English version
It will install itself and when finished
Then Click on SIW Icon to run program
On the left side click on the Motherboard directory and then on the right, copy and paste the information in your next reply
Please repeat for the Memory and attach that information also.
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#10
Digerati

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I do believe I have the knowledge to check the PSU. How would I go about it?

Unfortunately, there is no sure fire way for most users to test a PSU properly. Here is my canned text on testing PSUs.

To properly and conclusively test a power supply unit (PSU), it must be tested under various realistic "loads" then analyzed for excessive [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ripple_(electrical)""]ripple[/url] and other anomalies. This is done by a qualified technician using an oscilloscope or power analyzer - sophisticated (and expensive) electronic test equipment requiring special training to operate, and a basic knowledge of electronics theory to understand the results. Therefore, conclusively testing a power supply is done in properly equipped electronics repair facilities.

Fortunately, there are other options. I keep a FrozenCPU Ultimate PSU Tester in my tool bag when I am "in the field" and don't have a good spare power supply to swap in. While not a certain test, they are better than nothing. The advantage of this model is that it has an LCD readout of the voltage. With an actual voltage readout, you have a better chance of detecting a "failing" PSU, or one barely within specified ATX Form Factor Standard tolerances. Lesser models use LEDs to indicate the voltage is just within some "range". These are less informative, considerably cheaper, but still useful for detecting PSUs that have already "failed". Newegg has several testers to choose from. All these testers contain a "dummy load" to fool the PSU into thinking it is connected to a motherboard, and therefore allows the PSU to power on, if able, without being attached to a motherboard - great for testing fans, but again, it is not a true load or suitable for conclusive testing.

As mentioned, swapping in a known good supply is a tried and trued method of troubleshooting used for centuries, even by pros. Remove the "suspect" part and replace with a "known good" part and see if the problem goes away.

I do not recommend using a multimeter to test power supplies. To do it properly, that is, under a realistic load, the voltages on all the pins must be measured while the PSU is attached to the motherboard and the computer powered on. This requires poking (with some considerable force) two hard and sharp, highly conductive meter probes into the main power connector, deep in the heart of the computer. One tiny slip can destroy the motherboard, and everything plugged into it. It is not worth the risk considering most multimeters, like plug-in testers, do not measure, or reveal any unwanted and potentially disruptive AC components to the DC voltages.

And remember, anything that plugs into the wall can kill. Do not open the power supply's case unless you are a qualified electronics technician. There are NO user serviceable parts inside a power supply.
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