Jump to content

Welcome to Geeks to Go - Register now for FREE

Geeks To Go is a helpful hub, where thousands of volunteer geeks quickly serve friendly answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts. Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more.

Create Account How it Works
Photo

understanding speakers


  • Please log in to reply

#16
sulobaid

sulobaid

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 34 posts
ok im looking at the speakers on newegg. and i should be looking for the lowest signal to noise ratio yes?
  • 0

Advertisements


#17
Jonesey

Jonesey

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 335 posts
No!

You want the HIGHEST signal to noise ratio - that way any noise introduced by the speakers is kept to a minimum.

On saying that, I don't recall ever seeing a S/N ratio as being part of a speaker spec.

Do you mean the signal RANGE? i.e. 20Hz - 20KHz or similar?
  • 0

#18
Digerati

Digerati

    Grumpy Ol' MSgt (Ret.)

  • Retired Staff
  • 3,997 posts
  • MVP

On saying that, I don't recall ever seeing a S/N ratio as being part of a speaker spec.

Remember, computer speakers are "powered" speakers - with built in amplifiers where S/N ratios play a critical role in defining fidelity.
  • 0

#19
Jonesey

Jonesey

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 335 posts

On saying that, I don't recall ever seeing a S/N ratio as being part of a speaker spec.

Remember, computer speakers are "powered" speakers - with built in amplifiers where S/N ratios play a critical role in defining fidelity.


Very true :) but I suspect that achieving a high S/N ratio is probably a fair way down on the list of priorities when computer speakers/amplifiers are designed. Cost is king in low value audio peripherals, not fidelity. :)
  • 0

#20
sulobaid

sulobaid

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 34 posts
i havent seen signal to noise ratios on many speakers either, but the list of speakers on newegg has it in their specs. so good stuff, i know what to look for , thanks
  • 0

#21
Digerati

Digerati

    Grumpy Ol' MSgt (Ret.)

  • Retired Staff
  • 3,997 posts
  • MVP

On saying that, I don't recall ever seeing a S/N ratio as being part of a speaker spec.

Remember, computer speakers are "powered" speakers - with built in amplifiers where S/N ratios play a critical role in defining fidelity.


Very true :) but I suspect that achieving a high S/N ratio is probably a fair way down on the list of priorities when computer speakers/amplifiers are designed. Cost is king in low value audio peripherals, not fidelity. :)

I was just saying S/N ratios are characteristics of "electronic" amplifier circuits, not "mechanical" speakers.

Cost is king in low value audio peripherals, not fidelity.

That's true, but no budget has been stated. There are some fine "high-end" speaker systems designed for computer use. Of course they are no match for a home theater sound system costing thousands of dollars, but they do well enough. Previous high-end Logitechs have been impressive - I imagine the Z-5500 is too - with a decent source.

Edited by Digerati, 21 July 2009 - 03:43 PM.

  • 0






Similar Topics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

As Featured On:

Microsoft Yahoo BBC MSN PC Magazine Washington Post HP