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CPU and motherboard compatibility


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#1
vroni357

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Hi,
I have an ATX case and I want to reuse my CPU chip with a new motherboard. My chip is an Intel Celeron D 351 3.20GHz (133x24.0), 256KB Cache, 533 FSB, OEM, Socket 775 processor. The newer 3.20GHz chips are ridiculously expensive so I want to reuse the one I have because for me to get a newer chip that is reasonably priced, it would be a 2.something chip, and I would feel like I was going backwards.

The boards I've been looking at were specifically compatible with Celeron D CPUs (I wasn't sure my CPU was compatible with boards that just said Celeron as opposed to specifically Celeron D) with a FSB of 533 MHz and higher. But I'm not finding anything I like yet. My CPU only goes up to 533 MHz FSB, the better boards seem to only go down to 800 MHz FSB and are not specifically for Celeron D. Do I need a board that at least goes down to 533 MHz FSB or does it not matter at all whether they match or not because the higher speed item would still go further down even if it doesn't mention the slower speed?

Or simply put do the CPU and the motherboard FSB speed have to match at 533 MHz or not? And can my chip use a board that is for Celeron but not specifically for Celeron D? Thank you.
:)

Edited by vroni357, 18 July 2009 - 02:39 AM.

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#2
Troy

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Hey there,

Much more can be put into an answer than what I'm going to write. To put it simply, I would rather a 2.something Core 2 Duo than that old Celeron. While the clock speed is slower, the processor itself is much more efficient at processing and thus is faster at completing tasks overall. That's why the GHz race eventually stopped, and now it seems we're witnessing a core race. Dual core processors have been out for some time, and so have quad cores (and triple cores for that matter).

For compatibility, carefully research each potential motherboard. On the manufacturer's support page for the motherboard, you'll find a "CPU Support List", which is a full list of all processors supported by that motherboard, and if necessary, the BIOS revision needed as a minimum before the board will talk to the processor.

For an example, here is a link to the CPU support list for my motherboard. I'm using the E6750, which is on that list. If you scroll down the list near the bottom, your Celeron D 351 is listed as N/A, so you couldn't put your processor in my motherboard.

You'll also see some of the processors (the top ones, for example) listed as F14. With my current BIOS using revision F12, I would need to update the BIOS before I could upgrade my processor.

Let me know if that's enough for you, or you want more. :)

Troy
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#3
vroni357

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Hi,
Thank you for replying.

Much more can be put into an answer than what I'm going to write. To put it simply, I would rather a 2.something Core 2 Duo than that old Celeron. While the clock speed is slower, the processor itself is much more efficient at processing and thus is faster at completing tasks overall. That's why the GHz race eventually stopped, and now it seems we're witnessing a core race. Dual core processors have been out for some time, and so have quad cores (and triple cores for that matter).

Ok, let me get this straight, I finally made my way up to a 3.20GHz CPU and then they stopped increasing the GHz after that so now I have to start over again with cores, and the more cores the better. Do I have a handle on that? Bummer. :)

Would any of the CPUs below be as fast or faster than my Celeron?
http://www.tigerdire...mp;Sku=B69-2108
http://www.tigerdire...mp;Sku=B69-2109
http://www.tigerdire...mp;Sku=B69-3066
Are these right or can you please suggest any in the same price range?

Let me know if that's enough for you, or you want more.

Hit me with your best shot, I'll take as much as you're willing to give. Thank you.
:)

Edited by vroni357, 19 July 2009 - 12:29 AM.

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#4
Troy

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The middle one probably looks the best out of those options.

If you want to know more, show me by asking specific questions, as I can't think of anything else to include off the top of my head. :)

Cheers
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#5
vroni357

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Hi,

The middle one probably looks the best out of those options.

Ok, but would a 2.50GHz or 2.60GHz dual core CPU be as fast or faster than my single core 3.20GHz Celeron? And do you have any CPU/motherboard combo suggestions in the same price range? Thank you.
:)
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#6
Troy

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If the program is multi-core aware, then yes it would be faster. Also there's more to the architecture of a processor than just the clock speed - also have a look at the difference in cache sizes. Those dual cores have a much larger cache, which helps. While 3.2GHz is quick, it is a Celeron after all - a budget CPU.

I guess it all comes down to your needs. If you're happy with the speed of the Celeron, then all you need to do is find a board that will support it. If you're looking for more speed, then a more-efficient dual-core would be a good start.

And no I don't really have any other suggestions in that price range, if you carefully shop around you may find a slightly better deal here or there.

Cheers
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#7
vroni357

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Ok, I'll get one of the combos I showed you then. Thank you so much.
:)
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#8
vroni357

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Hi again,
I was wondering what you thought about these:
http://www.newegg.co...st=Combo.211729
and I think I could stretch the budget to this, what do you think
http://www.newegg.co...st=Combo.211681
http://www.newegg.co...st=Combo.212289.
Please let me know what you think. Thank you.
:)
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#9
Troy

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That middle option doesn't look too bad at all.
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#10
vroni357

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That middle option doesn't look too bad at all.

What makes this one http://www.newegg.co...st=Combo.211681 better than this one http://www.newegg.co...st=Combo.212289? The CPU is the same and the boards are real close, is it the brand or something about the board? Thank you.
:)
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#11
happyrock

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IMHO...go with the ASUS combo deal...they make good mobo's...
just out of curiosity why are you going with a Micro ATX FF

Edited by happyrock, 22 July 2009 - 11:11 AM.

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#12
vroni357

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just out of curiosity why are you going with a Micro ATX FF

I prefer ATX but in my price range I'm finding mostly Micro ATX.

Is ASRock not a good brand, it had really good reviews? Thank you.
:)
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#13
Troy

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Asrock is fine, either would be good but you'll find ASUS is more popular of the two. I have not personally dealt with Asrock support yet, but ASUS support is very good.

Nothing wrong with mATX, as long as it supports all your needs for a motherboard.

Troy
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#14
vroni357

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Asrock is fine, either would be good but you'll find ASUS is more popular of the two. I have not personally dealt with Asrock support yet, but ASUS support is very good.

Ok, yeah, I know ASUS is more popular, I was on their site and they have lots of nice features and normally I would prefer an ASUS board but in this particular case I'm leaning more towards the ASRock board because it has just a little more of what I need.

Nothing wrong with mATX, as long as it supports all your needs for a motherboard.

I could use 1 more slot but I can live with it though. Thank you so much.
:)
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#15
happyrock

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the upside to getting a rig like this is the support for the Intel Core 2 Duo Intel Core 2 Extreme if later on you decide to upgrade your system instead of replacing it...

got a ASUS P5KPL-AM SE Motherboard HERE for $54.99
Specifications
Form Factor: ATX

Processor Socket: Intel

Processor Interface: Socket 775

Processors Supported: Intel Pentium 4
Intel Pentium D
Intel Core 2 Duo
Intel Core 2 Extreme
Intel Core 2 Quad
Intel Celeron Dual Core
Intel Celeron 4xx

Additional Technologies: HyperThreading Technology
Vista Ready
RoHS Compliant

Front Side Bus: 800MHz
667MHz
1066MHz (Overclocking Only)

Northbridge: Intel G31

Southbridge: Intel ICH7

Number of Slots: 2

Number of Pins: 240-Pin

Maximum Memory Supported: 4GB

Memory Type: DDR2

Memory Supported: 667MHz DDR2
800MHz DDR2
and it supports New Budget Dual-Core CPUs: Intel Pentium E2160 and Pentium E2140 for $90.00...
benchmarks for the processors here...

Edited by happyrock, 23 July 2009 - 08:23 AM.

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