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[SOLVED] Computer won't boot properly - have I fried my processor?


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#1
Jack W-H

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Hi Geeks and Geekettes!

I'm in serious need of some geek help.

Like, REALLY serious.

I'll explain. After getting fed up of waiting half an hour for Dreamweaver to load or Photoshop to close etc. I decided it was time for an upgrade to my crappy Ei Systems 314 - 1GB RAM, Pentium 4 processor, Windows XP.

I plan on upgrading to 4GB RAM, Pentium E2180 (2GHz (but il overclock), dual core) processor, and eventually upgrading to Windows 7.

Since my model is so generic (got it from PC world) none of the socket specs were online. So that forced me to take it apart and have a look at what I could fit in.

Iv taken my PC apart a few times before, and put it back together again as usual afterwards with no previous difficulty.

So I removed one of the two RAM sticks to photograph the connection to check when buying the upgrades. I replaced it again, Im sure it's been put in as it should.

Next I dived in to the processor. This bit is where things go a little doolally...

I removed the fan on top of the heatsink. It is basically clipped on, so I just undid the clip. I unplugged the short fan cable from the motherboard.

Next came the heatsink. I unscrewed it from the motherboard, exposing the Processor socket. I put the heatsink and fan to one side.

The bottom of the heatsink and top of the processor were both covered in some sort of sticky White stuff. Is this glue or some form of shock absorber or something?

Being the foolish twit that I am, I released the catch that held the processor in place. And I'm ashamed to admit that I picked it up, with my bare, ungrounded hands. I photographed it to reference what socket type it takes, then replaced it.

I put the catch back on, put the heatsink and fan back in place. I closed the PC back up and brought it inside after giving it a good old dust-blow.

I plugged the PC back in.

The usual routine on powerup is this:

1. Fans start whirring
2. Computer clicks once (pause)
3. Computer clicks twice (pause)
4. Computer clicks again (4th time)
5. Computer beeps internally, DOS prompts, BIOS, and then Windows logo displayed on monitor.

Now what happened when I booted up wasn't good. The fans started whirring as they should. And that was that. No clicks, no beeps, no prompts, no logo. The HArd Drive indicator didn't light up at All

I fathomed that in order to start up the hard drive, the CPU has to process it or something. So methinks that's where the error is.

I unscrewed fan, heatsink and unhooked the processor once more. This time I carefully blew away any dust and dirties with an air puffer. I replaced it all again.

This time, on startup:


1. Fans start whirring
2. Computer clicks once (pause)
3. Computer clicks twice (pause)
4. Computer clicks again (4th time)
5. Computer beeps, yay!

6. Computing keeps beeping. 
7. Yet more beeps, repeating, over and over, like 30 times a second. Fail.

So clearly cleaning the processor of dust and my fingermarks made some sort of difference. But what do I do now?

Clean it again? What with?
Have I statically fried it? I didn't feel any static shock or anything..
Buy a new processor? Which I was gonna do anyway...
Cry?
Or could I have damaged something else in the process?

Thanks for your help!

 

Edited by Jack W-H, 07 August 2009 - 04:37 AM.

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#2
deeplyblue

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Okay, I can't solve your problem, but I can add some information which might help.

Firstly the beeps. Some beeping on boot up is normal, but there are a special collection of "Beep codes" which are there to allow a computer to tell that something is so wrong that it won't get as far as sending a message to the screen.

Exact codes can depend on the BIOS, but there's a list on this site:

Beep Codes

Whether that will give you any help, I don't know.

Secondly, the "white stuff" - that's "thermal paste". It's spread thinly on the surface of the CPU before the heatsink is placed on top. The idea is that air between the two reduces the efficiency of the cooling, whereas this paste (as I say, thinly and evenly applied) is squashed between the two (to eliminate air bubbles) and significantly improves the transfer of heat from the chip to the heatsink. Lack of that paste might reduce the efficiency of the cooling, but shouldn't cause anything to fry.

In fact, most modern chips/mobos have monitoring function which means that, if the chip gets too hot it just shuts down before any real damage is done.

Thirdly, you do know that if you have an ordinary 32-bit operating system (like standard XP or Vista), you won't get the full value of 4GB of RAM, don't you?

Fourthly, I have a rule of thumb (i.e. this is the way it has always seemed to work out, no matter what the manufacturers say), that if you want a new chip, it's time to get a new motherboard, and most probably the new sort of RAM which the mobo will need. And possibly a new hard drive (at least if your old one is IDE not SATA.) This doesn't always apply to hardcore upgraders, who want the newest chip every 6 months. However, if you want to buy a new chip, then you probably want a fairly new variety, and fairly new chips hardly ever seem to love old motherboards (more than 18 months old.) I'd check out which mobos your desired chip work with - I wasn't doing Intel when the P4 was current, but I suspect that a dual-core chip won't work on a P4 mobo. Could be wrong, but you do need to check that as a general principle, before wondering about your exact specs.

Quite often a new system box is the best answer - even if you want to keep your old monitor etc. If you don't want a new box, then a simple RAM upgrade to 2MB might help.

Fifthly, if you want to find out exactly what the specs of your components are, then you could try starting out with Sandra. Go to:

Softpedia Sandra Info and Download Page

Download and install the latest version of Sandra System Analyser. It will tell you exactly what chip, mobo, RAM etc you have, without you needing to do more than load a piece of free, and very reputable, software and let it do its stuff. You do sometimes have to comb through the vast quantities of information it gives you, but you can always copy the information directly to the clipboard and read it in an easier-to-search text editor.

After that you can Google your components and there's usually something to help, if you need to know more than Sandra will tell you. Sometimes mobo manufacturers have stopped listing their manuals (and even no-name mobos were made by someone, and usually had at least an information sheet), but someone somewhere may have a copy online.

Lastly, if you do get your system up and running, make sure that you have optimised everything so that your software and OS are making the best of your hardware. You might need a new chip - Photoshop can be demanding, but often making sure that you have your C: drive properly defragged and with lots of spare space on it will improve it performance considerably. Again, a new HD (making sure it will work with your old mobo) might help, if you don't want to get a new system.

Of course, all of this is no help if you have fried either the chip or the mobo, but you may just not have all the cables and connections tight. As a P.S. I'll add a rule I first came across in Jerry Pournelle's column. When something goes wrong with a piece of technology, first CHECK THE CABLES." I'll add my own gloss - "then check the connections. Then if they are OK, check the cables agains." It's worked for me for years - doesn't solve everything, but is always a good pace to start.

db
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#3
Jack W-H

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THANK YOU SO MUCH for your help. I really appreciate it! As you can tell by the fact that I'm typing this message (not on my iPhone anymore, haha) my computer is working again.

You know how I did it? This morning I came downstairs and switched it on again to remind myself what state it was in. And TADA! It magically worked all of a sudden... :)

Hope you didn't find that amazing amount of typing a waste! Seriously, a post like that is awesome, you should be promoted or something - and only 3 posts so far? Wow!

-----

you do know that if you have an ordinary 32-bit operating system (like standard XP or Vista), you won't get the full value of 4GB of RAM, don't you?


My plan is to get 4GB of RAM, then upgrade to Windows 7 64-bit... which leads me on to this...

I'd check out which mobos your desired chip work with - I wasn't doing Intel when the P4 was current, but I suspect that a dual-core chip won't work on a P4 mobo. Could be wrong, but you do need to check that as a general principle, before wondering about your exact specs.


My desired chip is an Intel Pentium E2180:

  • Dual Core
  • 64-Bit (I will upgrade to 64-bit Windows 7)
  • Socket 775 LGA

My current chip...

  • Single Core
  • 64-Bit (although I am running 32-bit Windows XP)
  • Socket 775 LGA

So I'm sure it'll be compatible, won't it? Same socket type, connections and everything.

if you want a new chip, it's time to get a new motherboard, and most probably the new sort of RAM which the mobo will need. And possibly a new hard drive (at least if your old one is IDE not SATA.)


As much as I'd love to, I'm 15 years old, and my only source of income is a paper round - no offence but this is a little over my budget :)

However, if you want to buy a new chip, then you probably want a fairly new variety


I am going for the Intel E2180 because it's a budget Dual-Core fast chip. I can't afford a Core2 Duo or i7 so this will have to do me for the time being - I'm not going to be hard-core-3d-gaming or anything, that's not really my kinda thing anyway.

Fifthly, if you want to find out exactly what the specs of your components are, then you could try starting out with Sandra


I discovered I had CPU-Z on my system so used that instead (sorry!).

Specs:

  • Intel Pentium 4 640
  • 3GHz
  • 1 Core
  • 2 Threads
  • 2 x 512MB RAM Sticks, DDR2
  • Motherboard:
  • Manufacturer: "DIXONSXP" (PC World shop brand, basically)
  • Model: RC4107MA-RS2H

A bit of googling suggests that RC4107MA-RS2H is made by Foxconn - although I doubt the specs on the site are entirely correct, since it says I have 8 USB 2.0 ports, yet all mine are USB 1.1 (another thing I'll eventually have to upgrade :) )

Lastly, if you do get your system up and running, make sure that you have optimised everything so that your software and OS are making the best of your hardware. You might need a new chip - Photoshop can be demanding, but often making sure that you have your C: drive properly defragged and with lots of spare space on it will improve it performance considerably. Again, a new HD (making sure it will work with your old mobo) might help, if you don't want to get a new system.


Thanks for the tips! I will bear these in mind.

Great post you made, thanks, it was really helpful.

Thank you to you and the other Geeks,

~ Jack
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#4
rshaffer61

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Just a FYI about upgrading to Windows 7 64 Bit
You can not just simply upgrade to this. You will have to do a fresh install and the reinstall all your programs.
This is straight from Microsofts knowledge base about OS systems



Can I upgrade from a 32-bit version of Windows to a 64-bit version of Windows?


No. If you are currently running a 32-bit version of Windows, you can only perform an upgrade to another 32-bit version of Windows. Similarly, if you are running a 64-bit version of Windows Vista, you can only perform an upgrade to another 64-bit version of Windows Vista.

If you want to move from a 32-bit version of Windows to a 64-bit version of Windows Vista, you'll need to back up your files and then perform a custom installation of the 64-bit version of Windows Vista. For more information, see Installing and reinstalling Windows.

For detailed information about installing and upgrading 32-bit and 64-bit versions of Windows, go to Installation choices for Windows Vista (32-bit) or Installation choices for Windows Vista (64-bit) online.


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#5
Jack W-H

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Just a FYI about upgrading to Windows 7 64 Bit
You can not just simply upgrade to this. You will have to do a fresh install and the reinstall all your programs.
This is straight from Microsofts knowledge base about OS systems



Can I upgrade from a 32-bit version of Windows to a 64-bit version of Windows?


No. If you are currently running a 32-bit version of Windows, you can only perform an upgrade to another 32-bit version of Windows. Similarly, if you are running a 64-bit version of Windows Vista, you can only perform an upgrade to another 64-bit version of Windows Vista.

If you want to move from a 32-bit version of Windows to a 64-bit version of Windows Vista, you'll need to back up your files and then perform a custom installation of the 64-bit version of Windows Vista. For more information, see Installing and reinstalling Windows.

For detailed information about installing and upgrading 32-bit and 64-bit versions of Windows, go to Installation choices for Windows Vista (32-bit) or Installation choices for Windows Vista (64-bit) online.


Urrrr... right... So, in order to upgrade to Windows 7 64-bit from Windows XP 32-bit, I will need to back up all my data, and reinstall 64-bit version over the top - I was prepared to do this anyway, since this is what I thought was meant to happen?

Or am I misunderstanding this, do I need to backup my data, install Windows XP 64-bit, THEN install Windows 7 64-bit? Sorry for my incompetence!
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#6
rshaffer61

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You cannot install a 64 bit OS over a 32 bit OS
You would need to backup your data
Format
Then do a fresh install
There would be no need to install XP 64 bit then install Windows 7 64 bit.
If you are buying a full version of Windows 7 64 bit then that is all you will need.

Not incompetence but a reasonable question.
Better to clarify before any mistakes are made.
One rule of thumb to remember:
If in doubt always backup and that way your data is always safe.
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#7
Jack W-H

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You cannot install a 64 bit OS over a 32 bit OS
You would need to backup your data
Format
Then do a fresh install
There would be no need to install XP 64 bit then install Windows 7 64 bit.
If you are buying a full version of Windows 7 64 bit then that is all you will need.

Not incompetence but a reasonable question.
Better to clarify before any mistakes are made.
One rule of thumb to remember:
If in doubt always backup and that way your data is always safe.


Thanks, I'll deffo make sure to do a full backup.

The Windows 7 RC is downloading as we speak, 64-bit English edition. I won't install it until my new Processor and RAM upgrades are in place. Will I just need to backup, format the drive, install the RC, and I'm good to go?

That seems a little too simple for Microsoft... :)
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#8
rshaffer61

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I have
XP Pro 32 Bit installed on one HD and Windows 7 32 bit installed on another HD.
When I boot I just change the boot sequence in Bios to determine which OS I want to use.
You can do the same thing but have a 32 bit OS on one HD and a 64 bit OS on another.

It is even possible to put them on the same HD with a separate partition for each.

FYI the Windows 7 RC will stop working in June of next year so make sure you have purchased a full version before then.
You will need to do a complete reinstall also of it.
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#9
Jack W-H

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I have
XP Pro 32 Bit installed on one HD and Windows 7 32 bit installed on another HD.
When I boot I just change the boot sequence in Bios to determine which OS I want to use.
You can do the same thing but have a 32 bit OS on one HD and a 64 bit OS on another.

It is even possible to put them on the same HD with a separate partition for each.

FYI the Windows 7 RC will stop working in June of next year so make sure you have purchased a full version before then.
You will need to do a complete reinstall also of it.


Cool! Thanks for the info. I've heard that on March 11th 2010 or something, Windows 7 RC will shut itself down automatically after 2 hours or something. I'll be sure to buy a copy before that. Thanks for the info.

I think I will put them on the same Hard Drive. I'll make another partition for this, and just keep the XP partition as a small one for backup. Thank you for your info.
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#10
rshaffer61

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June next year is the date you will need to have Windows 7 replaced with a retail version.
That is when it will shut down.
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#11
Jack W-H

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Quote from Microsoft's Windows 7 RC download page:

Here's what you need to know:

This is pre-release software, so please read the following to get an idea of the risks and key things you need to know before you try the RC.

Downloads will be available until August 20, 2009. After that, you can still install the RC and you can get a product key if you need one.

Watch the calendar. The RC will expire on June 1, 2010. Starting on March 1, 2010, your PC will begin shutting down every two hours. Windows will notify you two weeks before the bi-hourly shutdowns start. To avoid interruption, you'll need to install a non-expired version of Windows before March 1, 2010. You'll also need to install the programs and data that you want to use. (Learn more about installing Windows.)


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#12
rshaffer61

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Yep, the countdown will begin.
Hopefully everyone will be replacing their Windows 7 before March.
I just wanted to step in and give some info and hopefully it has helped you.
Congratulations on your issue being resolved.
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#13
deeplyblue

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Hi Jack

Just to add a few more notes.

Firstly: make a backup of all your data a.s.a.p. "Any of your data that isn't in at least two places, you don't care about." This is doubly true of a system which has completely packed in on you once - you don't know what made it stop, and you don't know what made it start again, so you have no idea when it will happen again. You have been warned!

Secondly, when backing up your files, make sure you remember that your email also needs backing up, as does your address book and, possibly, your bookmarks. If you have favourite templates in Dreamweaver, or Photoshop Plug-ins then those need backing up too. You can't rely on a total disk backup doing the job for you, since your backup system may give you a total disk image. This is fine if you need to restore the disk the way it was. If, however, you decide to install a new OS then you don't want a total disk image, you need something from which you can extract the data files.

If you are using Firefox (and I hope you are) then I recommend MozBackup for all your data backup and transfer, for Firefox and Thunderbird - it can making moving a Thunderbird profile almost painless (yes, really!). Review and download at

MozBackup at CNet

If you're going to be moving over to Windows 7, then you're going need a substantial amount of migration over and above the basic OS files. As rshaffer said, it is possible to use a dual boot setup, but I'm guessing that you may not have the hard disk space (judging by the rest of your spec) for two operating systems - especially one with the substantial footprint of the latest iteration of Windows (as opposed one of the leaner Linuxes, for example).

BTW to re-enforce what rshaffer said. Microsoft may sell you Windows 7 at an "upgrade price", but that doesn't mean that you can install it over XP. You'll have to have a completely blank partition, which usually means wiping your entire XP setup, including all your applications and all your data files. (If you have them in the same partition - I reckon that when God made partitioning software He intended us to use it to separate applications from data. Not everyone agrees, but many do.)

Then you have to start from scratch and install the new OS, and then Acrobat Reader and (possibly) unzip software, then all your drivers. These have come zipped and with important info in pdf format - which is why you need Acrobat Reader and unzipping software (both available as freeware), then you get your networking and internet setup (including a good firewall - many people use Zone Alarm, free to personal users and may have a Win 7 version out) on the new setup so that you can update your AV software (which will need to be a version for Win 7, I presume). Then add the rest of your utilities and applications, then all your app add-ons (Photoshop plug-ins, Excel macros etc), then all the other bits and pieces you forgot, and then your data files (unless they are on on your D: drive - see note on partitions above. I got a good piece of partitioning software off a disk on a magazine cover.)

Recommendation, then - first make sure that Windows 7 has drivers for all your hardware. It would be a nuisance to discover that your printer won't work with Windows 7, for example, or your old scanner. I read someone saying the other day, "Oh well, if you're upgrading to a new OS, you should always reckon on replacing at least one major peripheral - probably your printer." You might even find that there are no motherboard drivers - which would be a real PITA if you discovered it after you had wiped your XP setup.

Secondly, when you have established that there are drivers, download them ALL and save them all on a new CD/DVD for ease of re-installation. Thirdly, start NOW on making sure that you have the installation disks for all your applications, and all your favourite utilities (a major problem for me, as I'm a utilities junkie.)

While I'm on the topic of utilities - do download Sandra. It will tell you a [bleep] of a sight more than your CPU-Z does. For example, I have just run the very old version of Sandra (2004) on my old laptop. This is the first bit of the report on my CPU, it had a *lot* more detail later, which I've omitted so that you don't fall asleep reading this:

"SiSoftware Sandra

Processor
Model : Mobile AMD Athlon™ XP 2500+
Speed : 1.33GHz
Model Number : 2500 (estimated)
Performance Rating : PR1924 (estimated)
Type : Mobile
Package : Socket A PGA
Multiplier : 10/1x
Minimum/Maximum Multiplier : 6/1x / 14/1x
Generation : G7
Name : Mobile Athlon XP (Barton/Thorton) 1.6GHz+
Revision/Stepping : A / 0 (0)
Stepping Mask : A2
Core Voltage Rating : 1.200V
Min/Max Core Voltage : 1.200V / 1.400V
Maximum Physical / Virtual Addressing : 34-bit / 32-bit"

The "Mainboard Module" includes a couple of lines telling me about my RAM:

"Memory Module(s)
Memory Module 1 : Hyundai Electronics HYMD512M646DFP8J FFFF2190 1024MB 16x(64Mx8) DDR-SDRAM PC2700U-2533-700 (CL2.5 up to 167MHz) (CL2 up to 133MHz)
Memory Module 2 : Micron 8VDDT3264HDG-335C3 7508C23A 256MB 8x(16Mx16) DDR-SDRAM PC2700U-2533-700 (CL2.5 up to 167MHz) (CL2 up to 133MHz)"

and more about my RAM slots:

"Logical/Chipset 1 Memory Banks
Bank 0 : 512MB DDR-SDRAM 2.0-3-3-7CL 2CMD
Bank 1 : 512MB DDR-SDRAM 2.0-3-3-7CL 2CMD
Bank Interleave : 4-way
Speed : 2x 133MHz (266MHz data rate)
Multiplier : 1/1x
Width : 64-bit
Power Save Mode : No
Fixed Hole Present : No"

This sort of thing is invaluable if you need upgrade information.

Which brings me neatly to my next suggestion:

If you find that you have any shortfall of resources (including things like the mobo drivers) then you might consider investing in more RAM straight away, rather than in a new CPU. It can make a huge difference to the speed of your system, and is often recommended as the most cost-effective way to speed up a system. If you were planning on that anyway, then it might be an idea to try to bolster the RAM first and go for the new chip and new OS later. New RAM isn't as much fun - or as sexy - as a new processor, but it might be cheaper, and possibly more effective. If you're concerned about keeping to a strict budget (and I realise that paper rounds are not the stuff of which major upgrades are made), that might be the most efficient use of your resources.

Don't under-estimate the costs of a new chip - they can include a new heatsink and heatsink fan, and you will need some thermal paste as well, though, if you get a retail package complete with heatsink then you will often get a small sachet of thermal paste with it. Look on the internet for instructions for using thermal paste - the corner of an old credit/store card (someone will have a recently expired one), or plastic bus pass is the ideal instrument for spreading it. Don't omit it - and if you can use your old heatsink, make sure you clean all the old thermal paste off first. Vinegar and newspaper might do, if you don't have access to special cleaners.

Oh yes, and you might need to check whether your power supply has enough oomph for your new CPU. Mostly they do, but old PCWorld computers were often rather meanly supplied in PSU department. The wattage is often to be found on the back, which means you needn't even bother getting the cover off, but do check.

I hope some of this is useful to you. Don't skimp on the boring bits when thinking about a new OS or a new CPU. Some issues, if avoided now can come back and really bite you in the bum.

Good luck.

db
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#14
Jack W-H

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Firstly: make a backup of all your data a.s.a.p.


Done all the important stuff that I'll actually need :)

Secondly, when backing up your files, make sure you remember that your email also needs backing up, as does your address book and, possibly, your bookmarks.


I use Google Mail (GMail) so all my address book and emails are stored online. I have very few bookmarks due to new profile recently created in Firefox, so I the few important things I have used MozBackup on (thanks!).

If you're going to be moving over to Windows 7, then you're going need a substantial amount of migration over and above the basic OS files. As rshaffer said, it is possible to use a dual boot setup, but I'm guessing that you may not have the hard disk space (judging by the rest of your spec) for two operating systems - especially one with the substantial footprint of the latest iteration of Windows (as opposed one of the leaner Linuxes, for example).


Nope. 80GB isn't really enough space for two, is it? I'll get saving for a 120GB (at least) drive, haha :) In the meantime, a full backup of XP for those Just-In-Case scenarios of Windows 7 failing altogether will suffice (I hope!).

Recommendation, then - first make sure that Windows 7 has drivers for all your hardware. It would be a nuisance to discover that your printer won't work with Windows 7, for example, or your old scanner. I read someone saying the other day, "Oh well, if you're upgrading to a new OS, you should always reckon on replacing at least one major peripheral - probably your printer." You might even find that there are no motherboard drivers - which would be a real PITA if you discovered it after you had wiped your XP setup.


Apparently, my motherboard supports Windows 7 out of the box. It's not terribly clear from that link but apparently it looks like it's supported with a bit of Googling.

Epson lists the drivers for Windows 7 x64 available for my printer, so that's surprisingly OK.

Secondly, when you have established that there are drivers, download them ALL and save them all on a new CD/DVD for ease of re-installation.


All done! :)

If you find that you have any shortfall of resources (including things like the mobo drivers) then you might consider investing in more RAM straight away, rather than in a new CPU


I have bought the 4GB of RAM already, and have also already bought the new processor... all this came to under £50 (thanks, eBay! :) ) - I've been on holiday for a few days so I couldn't read your message before confirming the purchase. However the seller (a reputable PowerSeller) has given me his/her word that if any of the components don't work, they'll refund me if I send it back.

I went down to Maplins (electronics store) for some Thermal Paste, but the guy at the counter wouldn't sell me it since I'm under 18 :) - thanks again, eBay! :)

Anyways, to finish off, here is some specs from my Sandra report. Sorry it's so long, just a copy&paste job!

SiSoftware Sandra

System
Model : DIXONSXP Ei 314
Workgroup : WORKGROUP
Host Name : EiSystem314
User : Jack

Processor
Model : Intel® Pentium® 4 CPU 3.20GHz
Speed : 3.2GHz
Cores per Processor : 1 Unit(s)
Threads per Core : 2 Unit(s)
Integrated Data Cache : 16kB, Synchronous, Write-Thru, 8-way, 64 byte line size, 2 threads sharing
L2 On-board Cache : 2MB, ECC, Synchronous, ATC, 8-way, 64 byte line size, 2 lines per sector, 2 threads sharing

System
Mainboard : DIXONSXP RC4107MA-RS2H
BIOS : Phoenix Technologies, LTD 6.00 PG (09/05/2006)
Bus(es) : ISA X-Bus AGP PCI PCIe IMB USB i2c/SMBus
Multi-Processor (MP) Support : No
Multi-Processor Advanced PIC (APIC) : Yes
Total Memory : 1GB DIMM DDR2

Chipset
Model : Foxconn RS400/200 Host Bridge
Front Side Bus Speed : 4x 200MHz (800MHz)
Total Memory : 1GB DIMM DDR2
Memory Bus Speed : 2x 267MHz (534MHz)

Memory Module(s)
Memory Module : 512MB DIMM DDR2 PC2-4300U DDR2-534 (4-4-4-12 2-16-4-2)
Memory Module : 512MB DIMM DDR2 PC2-4300U DDR2-534 (4-4-4-12 2-16-4-2)

Video System
Adapter : NVIDIA GeForce 7900 GT/GTO (24 PS3.0, 8 VS3.0 468MHz, 256MB, PCIe 1.00 x16)

Storage Devices
WDC WD800BB-00JHC0 80GB (ATA100, 2MB Cache) : 75GB (C:)
ST 8GB 8GB (USB) : 7GB (J:)
Generic USB SD Reader (USB) : N/A (E:)
Generic USB CF Reader (USB) : N/A (F:)
Generic USB SM Reader (USB) : N/A (G:)
Generic USB MS Reader (USB) : N/A (H:)
EPSON Stylus Storage (USB) : N/A (I:)
IDE-DVD DVDRW8801 (ATA33, DVD+-RW, CD-RW, 2MB Cache) : N/A (D:)

Logical Storage Devices
Hard Disk (C:) : 70GB (NTFS) @ WDC WD800BB-00JHC0 80GB (ATA100, 2MB Cache)
Optical Drive (D:) : N/A @ IDE-DVD DVDRW8801 (ATA33, DVD+-RW, CD-RW, 2MB Cache)
Removable Drive (J:) : 7GB (FAT32) @ ST 8GB 8GB (USB)
Removable Drive (E:) : N/A @ Generic USB SD Reader (USB)
Removable Drive (F:) : N/A @ Generic USB CF Reader (USB)
Removable Drive (G:) : N/A @ Generic USB SM Reader (USB)
Removable Drive (H:) : N/A @ Generic USB MS Reader (USB)
Removable Drive (I:) : N/A @ EPSON Stylus Storage (USB)

Peripherals
LPC Hub Controller 1 : Foxconn IXP SB400 SMBus
LPC Hub Controller 2 : Foxconn IXP SB400 PCI-ISA Bridge
LPC Legacy Controller 1 : ITE IT8712F
Audio Device : Foxconn Realtek ALC 653
Serial Port(s) : 2
Parallel Port(s) : 1
Disk Controller : Foxconn IXP SB400 Serial ATA Controller
Disk Controller : Foxconn IXP SB400 Serial ATA Controller
Disk Controller : Foxconn IXP SB400 IDE Controller
USB Controller 1 : Foxconn IXP SB400 OHCI USB Controller
USB Controller 2 : Foxconn IXP SB400 OHCI USB Controller
SMBus/i2c Controller 1 : ATI SB400 SMBus

Printers and Faxes
Printer : Microsoft XPS Document Writer (600x600, Colour)
Printer : EPSON Stylus SX200 Series (360x360, USB, Colour)
Printer : doPDF 6 Printer Driver (2400x2400, Colour)

Scanners and Cameras
Scanner : EPSON NX200/SX200/TX200 (USB)

Network Services
Network Adapter : Belkin 54g Wireless USB Network Adapter #2 - Packet Scheduler Miniport (Ethernet, 12Mbps)

Power Management
Mains (AC) Line Status : On-Line

Operating System
Windows System : Microsoft Windows XP Professional Media Center 5.01.2600 (Service Pack 3)
Platform Compliance : x86


Thank you so much for all your help so far!
  • 0

#15
rshaffer61

rshaffer61

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BTW to re-enforce what rshaffer said. Microsoft may sell you Windows 7 at an "upgrade price", but that doesn't mean that you can install it over XP. You'll have to have a completely blank partition, which usually means wiping your entire XP setup, including all your applications and all your data files. (If you have them in the same partition - I reckon that when God made partitioning software He intended us to use it to separate applications from data. Not everyone agrees, but many do.)


This is only true if you are going from 32 bit to a 64 bit OS.
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