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IPv6 Connection


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#1
Beta55

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Simple terms.
Can somebody explain to me what IPv6 does, how it works and what will it do If I change it from Link-Local Only to PPPoE (My Internet connection type)
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#2
dsenette

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IPv6 is an extension of IPv4... IP (internet protocol) is the protocol that controls internet traffic... you may have heard of an IP address....this is a unique address that is assigned to a device on a network to identify it between other machines (like your mailing address....it's what keeps all your mail from going to anyone else in the world with the same name as you)

IPv4 addresses are made up of 4 blocks of 3 digit numbers between 000 and 255...IPv4 is a 32 bit address...these numbers represent octets in binary code (octets are 8 groups of numbers)... certain combinations of these numbers are reserved so they can't be used...this leaves you with a finite number of addresses that can be used...added to that...there are certain numbers in the address scheme that are reserved for private use and some reserved for public use.....it's a known issue that at some point we will run out of possible ip addresses in the IPv4 scheme...so they created IPv6 to extend the amount of possible addresses...IPv6 is a 128 bit address and are represented by a hexadecimal number..

that's a very brief explanation of what IPv6 is in relation to your question...there's a butt load more information if you look for it

in reference to your question though....IPv6 isn't in use yet and thus isn't controlling your internet connection currently so changing it's settings will do nothing.....are you having issues with anything?
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#3
Beta55

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IPv6 is an extension of IPv4... IP (internet protocol) is the protocol that controls internet traffic... you may have heard of an IP address....this is a unique address that is assigned to a device on a network to identify it between other machines (like your mailing address....it's what keeps all your mail from going to anyone else in the world with the same name as you)

IPv4 addresses are made up of 4 blocks of 3 digit numbers between 000 and 255...IPv4 is a 32 bit address...these numbers represent octets in binary code (octets are 8 groups of numbers)... certain combinations of these numbers are reserved so they can't be used...this leaves you with a finite number of addresses that can be used...added to that...there are certain numbers in the address scheme that are reserved for private use and some reserved for public use.....it's a known issue that at some point we will run out of possible ip addresses in the IPv4 scheme...so they created IPv6 to extend the amount of possible addresses...IPv6 is a 128 bit address and are represented by a hexadecimal number..

that's a very brief explanation of what IPv6 is in relation to your question...there's a butt load more information if you look for it

in reference to your question though....IPv6 isn't in use yet and thus isn't controlling your internet connection currently so changing it's settings will do nothing.....are you having issues with anything?


Nothing really, I just wanted 2 know if activating it would make my internet perform better. Because say I'm downloading something on PS3 and somebody else is watching something on youtube they might get some buffering. It usually just loads everything before it gets to the point that its playing. Nothing big. I have a power bar and another smaller bar connected that, the modem used 2 be connected into the second bar but i connected it into the first one, maybe the performance was limited by lack of power. Just a theory I thought thats probably wrong. But I only have 5mpbs internet connection so maybe this is expected when trying 2 do so much things at once.
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#4
dsenette

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well...having two power strips is a bad idea...not because it reduces the power available at the other end (though....it can)...but because you increase the risk of fire...and since you've now got 12 places to plug stuff in (depending on how many outlets are in the strips) on a circuit that was designed to have 2....you increase the risk of tripping a breaker


for the ipv6.....it won't speed anything up (actualy having ipv6 active along side of ipv4 could in theory slow things down)
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#5
Beta55

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well...having two power strips is a bad idea...not because it reduces the power available at the other end (though....it can)...but because you increase the risk of fire...and since you've now got 12 places to plug stuff in (depending on how many outlets are in the strips) on a circuit that was designed to have 2....you increase the risk of tripping a breaker


for the ipv6.....it won't speed anything up (actualy having ipv6 active along side of ipv4 could in theory slow things down)


Ok, another question not related to network connections.
I'm going to get a HDtv in my room along with my PS3 and a new quad core.
I want both of them 2 be nice and cool, my PS3 gets nice and loud if I don't have a breeze going throughout the house and its beside a window and I don't want to apply thermal compound again 2 years ealier on the PC. I just want a decently priced product that can cool both my PS3 and my PC to avoid hardware failures and heat.
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#6
dsenette

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if your room...or wherever you're keeping these products gets hot enough on a daily basis to cause a system that's built with adequate cooling to begin with (a ps3 is designed to cool itself) to fail due to heat...then you need to get your AC checked out
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#7
Beta55

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if your room...or wherever you're keeping these products gets hot enough on a daily basis to cause a system that's built with adequate cooling to begin with (a ps3 is designed to cool itself) to fail due to heat...then you need to get your AC checked out



Yeah, see I don't have my AC on 24/7, but when I do there will be a vent basically going straight where the PC and PS3 will be. I was wondering if I could get a separate product that could cool a small area in my room (which would be around the PS3 and the PC) 24/7.

Also, the PS3 cooling sucks, louder than my pentium 4 and geforce 6200 playing Battlefield 2. The slim is worse, I've been told.
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