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Foot drop


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#1
crooz

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I've recently developed a condition with my left foot and lower leg called "foot drop" - see link below. While sitting behind the PC at work for many hours and conversing with my new friends in the evening hours at G2G, I extensively and without thinking, for many hours cross my legs or balance my lower left leg over my right knee (can't do it with my right leg because of a ski accident) while sitting behind the PC. This has caused damage to the peroneal nerve (this perticular nerve runs from behind the knee towards the outside of the fibia). Being in this position for lengthy amounts of time is pinching the nerve. It's scaring the jeebeez outta me, cuz I'm limp now. Been to the family doctor already, who sent me directly to a neurologist. My next visit to a specialist is in a little over a month to a 'revalidation' doctor for an EMG. Socialized medicine, cheap... but when you need it most, tough luck. That doesn't make me anymore happier.
In any case, has anyone else ever experienced this syndrome? And what they had to go through to recover from it - which is not always possible.

Edited by crooz, 27 August 2009 - 03:18 PM.

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#2
dsenette

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i've not experienced it personally...but i used to work in a rehab facility (orthopedic, stroke, and brain/spinal chord injury...not drug) and it was a pretty common occurrence in bed ridden people...some are more prone to it than others though...due to circumstances

IN GENERAL (and this is not a medical opinion) foot drop that's caused the way you're describing it is usually reversible through physical therapy, stretching, and not doing what you did to cause it..... since you're a (presumably) fully functional person....the standard treatments should be effective for you
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#3
crooz

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Thanks dsenette for your reply.

IN GENERAL (and this is not a medical opinion) foot drop that's caused the way you're describing it is usually reversible through physical therapy, stretching, and not doing what you did to cause it..... since you're a (presumably) fully functional person....the standard treatments should be effective for you

That's pretty much what the neurologist said too. See stated that it should clear up on it's own, but that it may take a long time to do so. None the less, I really don't need this now. Conditions with mom and such - this is "Throwing the wrench in the spin machine."
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#4
datadabbler

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hi.

i am no way connected to the medical proffesion so just speak from personal experience , i suffered a slipped disc wich resulted in foot drop.( amongst other things) i was told by my physio to get plenty of exercise to strengthen my foot , the drop was caused by being on crutches for 2 months , i got plenty of walking in , and he gave me specific exercises, 12 months down the line the foot is back to 90 % normal position,

hope this helps
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#5
NomDeKeyz

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Hey crooz, hope you're doing better. Glad to hear datadabbler is improved so well.
I haven't had foot drop, but I have had many injuries, nerve and skeletal in particular.
I would recommend trying a few topical treatments to improve circulation and speed healing.
I can't say enough about topical arnica, so I will simply say it rocks for countless issues.
Peaceful Mountain (based in Boulder, CO) makes my favorite arnica/herbal topical ointments.
If you prefer something that goes on cleaner and without scent, try the ointment by Boiron.
Also, ask a naturopath/herbalist/homeopath about topical hypericum perforatum for nerve damage.
Lastly, I know it's a bit off topic, but there are a few books that were food for thought to me
when I was recovering from injury; you might appreciate them too. BodyMind and Body Electric.

BTW, Arnica is great for any inflamation and/or irritation of almost any sort (no open wounds).
I use it on my face/sinuses for sinus pressure, my jaw for toothaches/post-dentist, my temples
and neck for headaches, any bruise/muscle/joint aches, bug-bites, and the list goes on...

As with any topical you are new to, do a test-patch first. ^~

Be well. ~Nom

Edited by NomDeKeyz, 18 January 2010 - 07:55 PM.

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