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E8400 associated with multiple problems?


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#1
bluegang6

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hey,
im building a CPU with the E8400 processor.
i have read lots about the fans being not screwed on tightly, overheating issues, wrong reading, and the cpu getting fried, are there any reasons to this, what can i do to avoid those problems happening to me, please note:
i ordered the E8400 yesterday from newegg.ca, and they wont replace it if it is damaged, so does that mean, damaged out from the box or what?
what can i do not to damage it, and what if the screws arnt on to tightly, and newegg wont accept it back?

any help is appreciated
thanks



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#2
Neil Jones

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The main issue with the E8400 processor is the fact that the temperature sensor on it can get stuck. However this was common well over a year ago so I should hope it's fixed in the newer steppings. It's a nice processor though.

The other "feature" of stock Intel coolers is that they can be a proverbial pain in the backside to clip down properly. With the design of these coolers it only needs one corner to be slightly out and the temperature shoots through the roof.

With regards to your supplier, they mean they will not replace the processor if you damage it. There is a difference between being dead out of the box and dead because an end-user killed it.
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#3
makai

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To add to what Neil has said about "stock" coolers.

The stock coolers actually put undue stress on the motherboard during installation. Be very careful not to flex the board too much when installing the stock cooler. If possible, remove the motherboard first and support it while installing the cooler. Also, use Static safety while working on your computer at all times.
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#4
bluegang6

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thanks guys,
so i take it that the sensors are fixed now (in the newer models)?
and what shall i use to get the temperature of the CPU?
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#5
makai

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so i take it that the sensors are fixed now (in the newer models)?

No garuantees here.

To monitor temps... Depending on your motherboard manufacture, they may have a utility that can monitor voltages, temp, etc. Check your motherboard manufacture's website. Also, you could use Speedfan, or Coretemp. Google for them, their quite easy to find.
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#6
bluegang6

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kk thnx (btw, im using EVGA 750i :))
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#7
amw_drizz

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I wouldn't trust a stock heatsink with it. (meaning get an aftermarket one if you can) But mine has held steady in temps for almost a year now at 4.05ghz oc'ed (i am running an aftermarket one, to clear up any confusion)

Edited by amw_drizz, 07 September 2009 - 08:30 PM.

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