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Partitioning


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#16
makai

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George,
I guess the real question is... what do you want to accomplish with your set up? If you're going to run Raid mirror, then you needn't partition. How large are the drives you're referring to as "small"? While 160gbs is considered small to me, it may not be small to you. Perhaps you have drives that are smaller?

You're missing the point about partitioning and running the OS on a separate partition if you're thinking that a mirrored raid will run faster. The mirror is so you have redundacy of the entire disk. If you put all your data on the mirrored disk, this will mean... 1) that you'll cause more fragmentation the OS must work through, and 2) you'll have a mirror of that fragmentation. Of course, with the mirror, you'll have an automatic back up, which is what you might be aiming at. Not sure. Personally, I believe that Raid should only be used for servers, but many people use it at home... I really don't know why.

I've given you my thoughts and you have to take them with a grain of salt. If you choose to go raid, at least I'm sure you'll change from raid0... which is good! :)
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#17
george01

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You were quit right when you said about using the raid mirror for back up only. That is what I was thinking of. Not for storing data etc, only for the o/s and software files incase of any failures. That way I would always have the o/s on the mirrored drive. The 160g drives I only mentioned as being large to store o/s on after reading your article about how small they actually are (up to 4 or 5g).
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#18
makai

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You were quit right when you said about using the raid mirror for back up only. That is what I was thinking of. Not for storing data etc, only for the o/s and software files incase of any failures.

This is what you have Acronis for.

Think about this... if you raid two drives with just the OS and Programs, then basically, you give up these two drives for storing data. Also, according to the Raid Wiki, "a 2-disk RAID 1 array loses half of the total capacity that would have otherwise been available using both disks independently".

Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying don't run raid. It's just my opinion that with the tools you already have (Acronis), that raid is a waste for you. Not only in terms of disk usage, but also in terms of available motherboard drive allocations.

This is how I set up computers... based on two 320GB hard drives. These just happen to be the smallest I personally use, but it could easily apply to any drive size.

First Drive

C = 25gb
D = 15gb
E = 20gb
F + G = split the rest... ~ 130gb each

C drive has my OS and Program files. With ample room for working on the desktop, handling cache files... internet, google earth, temp files, vid and music temp files, etc. Anything I do can be worked on the desktop as there's enough room to play with on this partition. This partition is heavily maintained, meaning trash is constantly being removed and deleted, all AV and AntiSpyware is kept up to date, and importantly, in my opinion, the partition is regularly defragged. The OS and Programs have been running on this desktop for over a year since the initial installations, and there is no lag whatsoever.

D drive is used for games. I don't play many, but I do play some so all games go here. Games tend to update as you go along, so size may constantly grow. With the files on a separate partition, it doesn't affect C drive. By the way, all the games I play were at one time installed on C drive. What I did at some time was take the Program Files folder for each game and moved them to a partition. So... these games are now "stand alone" requiring no installation on C drive. I simply run them from a shortcut on my desktop. Its a very cool way of having your games available anytime you want to upgrade your hard drive. Just copy each game folder over to your new drive/partition and you can play them.

E drive is used for storing various "other" programs. Many of my programs don't require installation and are standalone. These programs get run from this drive via a shortcut in my Start menu, or by setting up a right-click context entry. Many small and even obsolete programs are kept on this drive. And even utilites, software updates, different versions of software, etc. Basically on this drive is a folder I call "Loader" which contains about 1.6gb of different things I may use while loading a computer. No programs are actually "installed" on this drive... this drive is only used to "store" programs I might use.

Also on this drive is my Tunes folder where I keep all my mp3s. Itunes is directed to the tunes folder as the default destination. I'm of the older generation, so I don't keep buying new albums, so my tunes folder only contains about 5gb of music.

F and G drive are used for basically anything from data storage, to downloaded files (like manuals used to help people here). All my photo programs are pointed to folders on one of these partitions, as are document applications. The drives are also used during video editing where files I work with can range in the 30gbs per file. Imagine if I did this kind of work on an unpartitioned drive! The only reason I spit the partitions is because I don't like having to manage large partitions... actually, I don't want "Windows" to have to manage large partitions. On the "F" partition are also "copies" of Acronis Images of C drive, ranging from 3.7gbs to 4.3 gbs. Periodically, I do full non-compressed backups of the C partition and place "copies" on the "F" partition.

Second Drive

H + I = split equaly to ~ 160gbs each

These drives are again for storing data (redundancy) and working video files... I do work a lot of video, and it does take a ton of room. Periodically, I'll dump the finished files to an external drive, and dump these resident files, but while working them, I need the space. On my "I" partition are copies of the Aconis imagaes resident on "F" partition. These are not actually copies, per se, as each image is actually created twice... once for "F" drive, and once for "I" drive. I do this so I know for sure at least one image might be good if I ever need it. If I just created one image, then copied it over to another partition, heaven knows if the copy might work.

Just so you know, I have redundancy thrice-fold or more. I also own laptops, so any important data, data I absolutely cannot lose, is stored not only on my desktop (in two locations), but also on my laptops in more than two locations, since I own several laptops. My mp3 library is also stored on my desktop, laptops, and on an external HDD. All Acronis images for my desktop, and all my laptops are not only stored on the devices themselves, but also stored on two separate external HDDs. If any of my computers go down, or if I just decide to upgrade the HDD, I am back up and running is less than 20 minutes. I also repair computers for people, and so I also store images for their computers. You just can't imagine how many times I've had to redo other peoples computers... more than once! The images sure come in handy!
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#19
george01

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Thanks, let me digest this. If any queeries will post.

George
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#20
makai

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By all means. Just something to think about.
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#21
george01

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Have taken your advice (many thanks) and now have my C drive with just the op system and programme files on it - about 10gb. Everything else I have split over the the other hard drives I have. Have created a true image of the C drive - others to do. On re-booting the system is taking about two mins to run up, which if I consider that I only have 10gb on the drive is a long time. What would be causing this.
Am also going to search the forum's to see if there are any answers there.

George
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#22
makai

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If this is a fresh install, it shouldn't take 2 mins to boot. Is this 2 mins just to get to the desktop? Is Device Manager clear of any exclamation or question marks? If you installed an AV, which one did you install?
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#23
george01

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The op system is the same one that was running, I have just stripped the drive down to the op/sys and software file, moving everything else. I then ran Diskeeper and JV16 power tools to clean up the drive.

Device Mgr shows two:
1. Realtek AC97 Audio Controller
2. Multimedia Video Controller

Am running Kaspersky 09 AV at present.

George
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#24
george01

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Sorry, it takes 2 mins from boot screen to desktop screen

George
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#25
makai

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If Kasper is scanning at boot, it might be the cause of the delay. You might check the options.

What kind of motherboard do you have... if this is an OEM computer, what's the full model number? I looked in your other thread but didn't see anything posted... perhap I missed it.
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#26
george01

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The motherboard is an Asus A8v Deluxe.

Kaspersky is running at Boot, presume I should disable it then?

As I said I have taken onboard what you said and dropped the Raid from all my drives expect C which is running the op sys. This I am going to do once I have a back up of it, incase of problems. Then I shall run them all without Raid facility. It has just taken a long time to move files between the drives and reformatting etc.

George
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#27
makai

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Ok, now I'm a bit confused.

As I said I have taken onboard what you said and dropped the Raid from all my drives expect C which is running the op sys.

How did you drop raid from the other drives if you're still running raid?
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#28
george01

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I have the following:

C h/drive - (Raid) Running the op sys - Yet to be changed.

D h/drive - (ide) - My files

E h/drive - (ide) - Music

F h/drive - (ide) - Photos

external drive - (scsi) Back up

Hope this makes sense.

I disabled Kaspersky at boot but it made no difference.

George
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#29
makai

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Sorry, but I'm still confused. :) And if I'm this confused, I'm not going to be of much help to you! :)

C h/drive - (Raid) Running the op sys - Yet to be changed.

D h/drive - (ide) - My files

E h/drive - (ide) - Music

F h/drive - (ide) - Photos

What does the "h" stand for. Is this a separate hard drive?

Let's digress a bit... I was under the assumption that you were originally running two 160gb drives in a raid0 configuration. I don't know where I got that idea, but it might be something you mentioned. Is this not true?

If it is true, then how did you end up with only C drive being on raid and "dropped the Raid from all my drives expect C"? You say it's the same OS, so I'm guessing you couldn't have formatted the drives because it doesn't sound like you did. It almost sounds like you have 5 hard drives in the computer. Do you actually have 5 hard drives?

Sorry, but something about your build seems to have been left out from all our conversations. :)
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#30
george01

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Yes 5 in total.

3 formatted to ide on which I have saved photos, music and personal files. Two of which were in Raid format but have subsequently been reformatted. The othere disk was formatted but not connected. It is now connected and is part of the 3.

2 discs which still remain in raid format and have on them the op system. These have not been reformatted and still remain as was. I have merely stripped all my files from them and put them on the other 3 disks. My next task was to image these to back up - reformat - remove one and install the op sys to one disk - thus removing raid entirely.

Does this make sense?

George
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