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Problems with memory


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#1
boz1965

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Hi.

I'm having this problem with my computer's memory:

Memory: CORSAIR 4GB DDR2 XMS2 PC6400 800MHZ (2X2GB)

BIOS registers the memory as PC5300 when I use the MB's (Asus P5WD2 Premium) default settings and it recognizes 4096MB. When I overclock the processor (no matter what speed) BIOS will only recognize the memory as PC3200 but still at 4096MB.

When Windows is loaded (Win Xp SP3, Vista SP1 or Win7 - I use cassettes with different HDD's to boot from) the O/S only recognizes 3071MB of memory.

How do I:

1. "Convince" BIOS that it REALLY is PC6400 that should be running in 800MHz - overclocked processor or not
2. Get Windows to recognize the full 4096MB's

Solutions anyone?

Edited by boz1965, 19 October 2009 - 01:35 AM.

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#2
rshaffer61

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Not sure about the first one but the second questions is easy.
You are running a 32 bit OS and even on it's best day it will only see and utilize up to 3.5 gigs of memory.
To utilize everything you have you would need a 64 bit OS.
TO check this do the following:

Method 1: View System Properties in Control Panel
1. Click Start and then click Run.
2. Type sysdm.cpl and then click OK.
3. Click the General tab. The operating system is displayed as follows:
For a 64-bit version operating system: Windows XP Professional x64 Edition Version < Year> appears under System.
For a 32-bit version operating system: Windows XP Professional Version <Year> appears under System.
Note Year is a placeholder for a year.

Method 2: View System Information window
  • 1. Click Start and then click Run.
    2. Type winmsd.exe and then click OK.
    3. When System Summary is selected in the navigation pane, locate Processor under Item in the details pane. Note the Value.
  • If the value that corresponds to Processor starts with x86, the computer is running a 32-bit version of Windows.
  • If the value that corresponds to Processor starts with ia64 or AMD64, the computer is running a 64-bit version of Windows.

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#3
boz1965

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First: Thank you for your answer :)

My processor is a Pentium D 920 2.8GHz, in other words a 32-bit processor.
Having a 32-bit processor makes me a bit doubtful in the meaningfulness for me to install the 64-bit version of the O/S even though I have that possibility, at least for Vista and Win7 since I have access to the "Ultimate" versions via my employer's MSDN subscription. The IT technician (it's a small company) just scratches his head and cannot solve my problem. It's not a major problem since the computer obviously is working, but it would be "nice" to be able to use its full potential. So my next question is: Can I benefit from installing the 64-bit version even though my processor is a 32-bit Pentium D?
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#4
rshaffer61

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To answer your concern it will not work with a 32 bit CPU.

The bios may not be able to utilize the type of memory either. I am checking on that as we speak.
DO you have the users manual for the motherboard?
There should be a table that tells exactly what memory is compatible with your motherboard.
It seems there are different versions of that mobo on Asus's site so it may make a difference which type of memory it is capable of handling.
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#5
dsenette

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does the computer use onboard graphics? or an expansion card? if it's onboard then your video GPU is using shared RAM...i.e. it's using a portion of your system memory to do it's job...of course that leaves you missing AROUND 1gb of RAM there....though the rest could be the standard RAM limit in a 32 bit system
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#6
boz1965

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Hi.

I'm using a separate graphics card: ASUS EXTREME GEFORCE 6600LE 256MB SILENT PCI-E
I'm pretty sure it doesn't use any "on board" memory. It's not what I would call an advanced graphics card, but it doesn't have to be since this is not my gaming computer.

But as I said before: It's not exactly the end of the world, but it would be nice to be able to use my computer's capacity to the fullest.

Thank you for you reply. :)
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