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raid setup noob needs advise


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#1
myfamiliestech

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hope this is the right forum. I'm about to start my new computer build from the ground up. it will be my first after numerous times upgrading an old machine. 3 things im installing windows 7 ultimate ed.

1. is it true i dont need any raid drivers for win7?

2. my 4 HD's are x2 velocirator 300gbs raid 0 & x2 WD 1tera for storage. should i put the x2 1tera's in JBOD or raid 0 or whats the best setup at all period.

3. if the x2 1tera's are in another raid will windows see them all no matter what config they are in.

hope i didnt sound like to much of a noob. thanx
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#2
edge2022

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Windows 7 should detect your RAID setup, and if not, pop in your motherboard disc and choose the correct RAID controller drivers.
The Velociraptors should be in RAID 0 and should have your OS and apps. If you want to make sure your drives are protected against failure, then RAID 1.
The 1TB drives are your choice... you can run them as JBOD, but there really isn't any point. If these drives are going to be carrying very critical info, the RAID 1, otherwise 0 or JBOD (or you could just leave them as 2 HDDs)

if the x2 1tera's are in another raid will windows see them all no matter what config they are in.

What exactly do you mean? I'm a noob to RAID as well, don't really find much use for them, excluding RAID 0.
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#3
Troy

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If you are running the Velociraptors in RAID 0, I strongly recommend you run the 1 TB drives in RAID 1 and store all your data on it. For your OS, if either of the Velociraptors fails you will lose data from both drives. If one of the 1TB drives fails, then you will be able to replace it, rebuild the RAID, and not lose your data (so long as the other one doesn't fail as well). Note that this should not take place of regular backups of your important data.

Basically what you are doing is using 4 hard drives in lots of 2, so Windows will "see" 2 hard drives.

Windows will see each drive or "set of drives in RAID" as another drive under My Computer. So if you have 2 standalone drives and then 2 drives running in RAID 0, My Computer will report 3 drives.

Clear as mud?
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#4
shmar10

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Great topic. Hope I'm not stepping on toes here, but I think it is relevant.

Can you use four hard drives and set 1 and 2 in RAID 0, set 3 and 4 in RAID 0 also, but use 3 and 4 as RAID 1 of set 1 and 2?

Hope that makes sense.
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#5
Troy

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Yes you can, however you will need a very high-end controller to run this as not many can support it. This is called RAID 0+1.
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#6
shmar10

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Yes you can, however you will need a very high-end controller to run this as not many can support it. This is called RAID 0+1.


Is that different than RAID 10?
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#7
Troy

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Yes, the opposite. RAID 10 (or 1+0) is two sets of drives striped as RAID 1 each, and then both sets are striped together in RAID 0. This gives you better redundancy for failure.
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#8
shmar10

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Yes, the opposite. RAID 10 (or 1+0) is two sets of drives striped as RAID 1 each, and then both sets are striped together in RAID 0. This gives you better redundancy for failure.


Do you need a RAID controller card for this?
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#9
Troy

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Yes, and it will need to be a high-end card as budget cards do not generally support this function.
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