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Dual monitors


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#1
drmoneejd

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i have ATI Radeon HD 3300 Graphics onboard that i currently use. However, on my board i have three ports, one HDMI, one VGA, and one DVI-D. I was really thinking about setting up dual monitors, but i don't know if i can without having to buy another graphics card, and i don't have an extra monitor to figure out (i use the VGA port, and don't want another monitor yet if I can't set this up with only this card). So does anyone know if it is possible to plug two monitors into two of my three onboard ports and get it to work? Or someway i can find out? Thanks :)
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#2
Digerati

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Or someway i can find out?

Yeah. Read the manual. If you don't have it, go out to the motherboard maker's site and download it from there. I suspect you can run at least two monitors, but without knowing specifics, I don't know for sure.

But I do know this - integrated graphics snags large chunks of system RAM to use for graphics. Running two monitors will tax your system even more than one. Getting just about any old card that supports two monitors, then disabling your on-board will yield better over all computer performance than running your current monitor, or two monitors from your on board. This is because just about any card will have a better GPU, and it will have it's own dedicated RAM tweaked for graphics processing freeing up the previously snagged system RAM. This, in effect, gives you a little RAM increase in the process. The only downside is a new graphics card may require a bigger PSU.
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#3
drmoneejd

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oh, okay. i will look, and see. thanks a lot though! and if it doesn't support it or run to my standards, then i will buy another one, but im pretty sure my PSU will be fine because its already much more than i need. Thanks :)
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