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Cleaning up Processor


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#1
Axelion

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Well, couple days ago I replaced my E2200 to E8200. I thought I might sell E2200 because I don't need it.
When I pulled the processor out of my computer, there are many thermal grease around it and even got into the green plate(is that how you call it?) on top side of processor. I'm cleaning the processor using toilet paper because the thermal grease is very sticky there. Is there a better way to clean it? The processor would still work, right? I have no way to test unless I want to put back the processor again to my computer which is time consuming.

Edited by Axelion, 20 November 2009 - 01:15 PM.

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#2
dsenette

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you can scrape the bulk of the paste off with an old credit card or a razor blade (be careful with the blade)...then use alcohol wipes (i use the lens cleaning wipes that come with my glasses) to clean up the rest of the residue....your main concern is not touching the pins on the bottom of the processor...you REALLY don't want to bend any of those
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#3
Mitesh

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IDealy you do not want any of your skin residue to leave behind anyhting on the CPU taht includes the actual surface that disperses the heat where the heatsink sits. This surface has many pits, the idea of thermal paste is to fill these pits and thus creating a impeccable surface for the heatsink to contact. As well as of course providing thermal transfer.

To remove grease from your hands (I also mean skin oil) use fairy liquid before handling components.
Following this I use Arcticclean - http://www.ebuyer.com/product/139175 to clean and prepare the surface of the CPU. I use coffee filters for cleaning as they are lint free and I believe they do not scratch the CPU.

Given your situation I doubt you want to buy anything to clean it however given the fact you have posted asking how to better clean it I would suggest that if you have isopropyl alcohol then you should use that to clean it and a coffe filter - both can be bought for not much expense and can be used for other purposes - the isopropyl has multiple uses for example.

Place it in a ant-static bag once finished and always use a anti-static wristband when handling a CPU, and like dsenerre said DO NOT touch those pins!!!!

Ideally place it back in the original packaging as that wil prevent the pins from getting bent.
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#4
Axelion

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Thanks a lot!!
One more question. You guys mentioned something to be careful with the pin but what pin?? the back of my cpu looks like this, http://www.teschke.d...-pins-gr-ss.jpg
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#5
Mitesh

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You are using a Intel CPU - these have the pins on the actual motherbaord as if the pins are damaged by yourself then it is generally cheaper to replace a motherboard then the CPU - either way do not touch those gold contacts on the bottom of the CPU.
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