Jump to content

Welcome to Geeks to Go - Register now for FREE

Geeks To Go is a helpful hub, where thousands of volunteer geeks quickly serve friendly answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts. Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more.

Create Account How it Works
Photo

Power Cord Question


  • Please log in to reply

#1
SandV4

SandV4

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 26 posts
Hey all,

So I moved from the states to Germany (I'm in the Army) and am wondering about the power cords for my wife's desktop. They are the typical power supply cords (three flat prong) and the hardware is dual voltage, but are the cords automatically as well? I ask because all other cords that I have for dual voltage items have the converter "box" attached to them. I really don't want to just take the chance and wind up blowing something. If it helps any, I have the cords for the tower, the monitor and for a 3-in-1 printer. Thanks for the help.
  • 0

Advertisements


#2
bartblaze

bartblaze

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 139 posts
In Europe we have indeed only 2 prongs.

imho, I would buy some new power cords when you're in Germany.

Hope this helps.
  • 0

#3
SandV4

SandV4

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 26 posts
I know about the actual wall prongs. I have the adapter for them. I guess I should elaborate on my question. What I am wondering is if the cords themselves are capable of carrying both voltages without causing any issues. Like I mentioned, all other cords that I have for dual voltage devices have the converter "box" attached to the cord. These cords that are in question do not. They just connect directly from the wall to the device. If I were to attach a wall plug converter (from American outlet to European outlet) would the cord be ok to carry the higher voltage without one of the converter "boxes" attached to it?
  • 0

#4
Kemasa

Kemasa

    Nobody

  • Technician
  • 1,575 posts
The cords should be able to carry both voltages, but you might check to see if the cord is marked.

Also, make sure that there is not something which you need to do in order to get it to work on a different voltage. In some cases there is a switch on the back of the power supply.
  • 0

#5
Digerati

Digerati

    Grumpy Ol' MSgt (Ret.)

  • Retired Staff
  • 3,997 posts
  • MVP
The power supply should be your greater concern. You say it is dual-voltage, make sure. Some automatically change, some, as Kemasa said, require you to change a switch on the back of the supply.

Your monitor may be another issue, depending on type and age. Germany runs on 50Hz where here in the US, we use 60Hz. Most computer hardware actually runs on DC power, which is provided by the AC to DC converter circuits in the supplies. And since most manufacturers sell their products world-wide, it is not a problem. But if your monitor is old, or for some reason made for 60Hz only, it won't work properly there. So make sure it says 50/60 Hz too.

PS - Thanks for serving and thanks to your families for their sacrifices too.
  • 0






Similar Topics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

As Featured On:

Microsoft Yahoo BBC MSN PC Magazine Washington Post HP