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FPS?


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#1
Axelion

Axelion

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What is the minimum Frames Per Second for game to start lagging?
I've been seeing many FPS chart on gpu benchmark but I wanted to know at what point game will start to lag.
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#2
Neil Jones

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As a general rule with any animated sequence the human eye notices jerkiness when the frame rate drops below 25 frames per second. Typically by the time you get down to 22, 21, 20 you get a "filmic" effect, which in film production is caused by chopping out every other frame or two. Anything below 20 and it's really noticeable. Obviously the higher you go the better effect you get and the smoother the flow.
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#3
Axelion

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So 30 fps in any game considered smooth enough, am I correct?

I heard that overclocking video card is bad because the increase of voltage that lower the life expetancy of the core, but what about underclocking a video? My video card tends to get hot. I'm not sure if underclocking video will have a bad effect to the video card or not.
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#4
Neil Jones

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Anything over 30 is adequate, as you can't see it anyway. Bit like your original generation TV sets, the screens were redrawn 50 times a second, it was so fast you couldn't see it.

Re: overclocking. Overclocking can be bad. Extra heat, no extra cooling usually means it doesn't last as long. Underclocking is theoretically better as it has the reverse effect - less load = less heat = less prone to falling over. However it will lead to reduced performance.
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