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#1
sloef

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Hello guys ,

I was wondering the next thing :

My computer is +/- 1 Year old ,
and i wasn't satisfied about my video card so i decided to buy a new one , which I did .
I bought a Nvidia GeForce GTX 260 , a very good card .
My previous one was a Nvidia GeForce 9400 256 MB (Nvidia GeForce Boost combining GeForce 8200 & GeForce 9300) = 1 Card .

When I installed the GTX card , and tried to start my computer, I couldn't see anything and it made a very irritating noise all the time .
I did some research and found the problem , my Power Supply.
MODEL NO: FSP250-60HEN
AC Input:220-230V-, 2A,50hz
(+3.3V +5v = 115W Max), Total output continuous shall not exceed 250watts .

The GTX card needs 450W and I have 250 .
So I decided to buy the following power supply :
http://www.computerp...4p_atx_12v_v2_0

Would my GTX work now, or do I need anything else ?
Would it give errors or problems working with my motherboard, ram, etc .. ?

Specs :
- 4gb ram
- AMD Phenom X4 9100E Quad Processor
- High Definition Multimedia Interface (HDMI)
- 640 GB SATA hard drive
- Old Graphic Card Nvidia GeForce 9400 256MB

I hope someone could answer me :)
Thanks already !
Grtz, sloef .
P.S. sorry for the bad english.

Edited by sloef, 19 December 2009 - 11:13 AM.

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#2
Digerati

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I bought a Nvidia GeForce GTX 260 , a very good card

Yes it is. I have Gigabyte GTX260 896Mb card and am very happy with it.

I happen to like Antec PSUs and 500W is a good size for your system. Your only concern is to make sure you have connected all the necessary power connectors to both the card and the motherboard. Make sure too you have followed the instructions to install the necessary drivers.
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#3
sloef

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I bought a Nvidia GeForce GTX 260 , a very good card

Yes it is. I have Gigabyte GTX260 896Mb card and am very happy with it.

I happen to like Antec PSUs and 500W is a good size for your system. Your only concern is to make sure you have connected all the necessary power connectors to both the card and the motherboard. Make sure too you have followed the instructions to install the necessary drivers.

Thank you , and I do know it is a very good card .
But, I'm scarred it would do some damage to my motherboard .
Because it's 500W instead of 250W, isn't it too much ?
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#4
Digerati

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But, I'm scarred it would do some damage to my motherboard .
Because it's 500W instead of 250W, isn't it too much ?

Oh, I see what you are asking. Don't worry about it! That is not how electronics work. Electronics only draw from power supplies what they need. PSUs only deliver what is demanded of them. So if your motherboard, RAM, drives, graphics card, and CPU require 350 watts, that is all they will pull from the power supply, regardless if the PSU is a 400 watt supply, a 650 watt supply or a 1000 watt supply. In fact, if your computer only needs 350 watts, that is all that will be pulled from the wall outlet (plus a little for PSU overhead and inefficiency).

So the only danger there is to buying too big of a power supply is the larger dent it causes in your wallet! :)
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#5
sloef

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But, I'm scarred it would do some damage to my motherboard .
Because it's 500W instead of 250W, isn't it too much ?

Oh, I see what you are asking. Don't worry about it! That is not how electronics work. Electronics only draw from power supplies what they need. PSUs only deliver what is demanded of them. So if your motherboard, RAM, drives, graphics card, and CPU require 350 watts, that is all they will pull from the power supply, regardless if the PSU is a 400 watt supply, a 650 watt supply or a 1000 watt supply. In fact, if your computer only needs 350 watts, that is all that will be pulled from the wall outlet (plus a little for PSU overhead and inefficiency).

So the only danger there is to buying too big of a power supply is the larger dent it causes in your wallet! :)

Thanks for helping !
but I still have another question :) .
I'm going to buy a 500W Power Supply ,
Where can I see the current size of my Power Supply ? Or do I have to get it manually ?
And, my video card needs 450W, so let's say :
Motherboard : 50W
video card : 450W
...
= 500W
Or is it just, the highest part from your computer that you need to check ? (video card)
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#6
Digerati

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There is nothing that will detect, then report your PSU size. You have to look at the label attached to it.

If you look at your video card requirements again, you will note the minimum PSU requirement is for the whole computer, not just the card. So it takes into account a typical motherboard, RAM, HD, and optical drive. If you are uncertain you have enough juice with a 500W, get a 600W. Then you will certainly have enough reserve for more RAM, an extra drive, or bigger CPU if you upgrade a year or two down the road.
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#7
sloef

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My computer is currently running with 250W PSU ,
so, if I buy :
http://www.computerp...4p_atx_12v_v2_0

It would have 50W extra because my vid card only needs 450 and everything would work great or am I wrong?
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#8
happyrock

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go here....plug in your components...
get a more powerful PSU then it recommends to leave some headroom ..in case you want to add someting else later...
IE...if it says you need a 500W psu...get a 600W
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#9
Digerati

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My computer is currently running with 250W PSU ,
so, if I buy :
http://www.computerp...4p_atx_12v_v2_0

It would have 50W extra because my vid card only needs 450 and everything would work great or am I wrong?

That link does not work.
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#10
sloef

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http://www.computerp...4p_atx_12v_v2_0
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#11
sloef

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go here....plug in your components...
get a more powerful PSU then it recommends to leave some headroom ..in case you want to add someting else later...
IE...if it says you need a 500W psu...get a 600W

That website tells me I need +/- 400Watt with my current parts .
And.. I have a 250W PSU? :)
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#12
happyrock

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first...don't quote everything we say it only slows things down...
don't skimp on PSU's...the cheap ones can sometimes go postal when they die taking lots of other components with it
if it says you need 400W...get a 500W...THE DIFFERENCE IN PRICE IS SMALL
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