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First time building a desktop PC.


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#46
Erolunai

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I currently do not have the wrist strap, that should be arriving on monday...
I'm currently wearing shoes, as well as sitting on a desk chair, if that changes anything...
My other option, while not as comfortable nor clean nor well lit, would be a desk outside my room in the basement.

I haven't opened up much or touched any sensitive computer parts yet, just the RAM - which is still in it's plastic casing.

I'm just... very nervous.

Currently reading through any manuals I can find.

edit: tested quickly - touched the metal sides of the desk, and got a small zap, shuffled feet about frantically, both with and without shoes on the thin carpet, and got nothing... could also try putting plastic down?

Edited by Erolunai, 03 February 2010 - 07:11 PM.

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#47
Ferrari

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It's normal to be nervous. A good start would be to look at that guide I linked to earlier in the post, How to Build Your Own Computer.

I would install the CPU (along with heatsink and fan), and the RAM onto the motherboard before you insert the motherboard into the case. You can do that by laying it on a piece of cardboard on your desk. And remember, use the standoffs on the holes you will be using to attached the motherboard to the case. They go inbetween the motherboard and the case. Go ahead and put the power supply in the case.
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#48
Erolunai

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I'm not quite there yet...
Are those options okay for preventing electrical discharge?
My father is making a make-shift anti static bracelet using copper wire, attached to the old case and then wrapped around my wrist, would this be acceptable?

I've been looking at the guide as well, it really helps a lot :)
and I'll make sure to install the CPU, heatsink and RAM first before that...
did you mean that I should rest the motherboard on the cardboard?
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#49
Ferrari

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Yeah, rest the motherboard on cardboard as you install the cpu and RAM, etc. This way, the soldered pieces on the back of the motherboard don't become bent, broken, or damaged.

I think as long as you touch metal before you touch any parts, you should be fine. Honestly, a part time job I have I work on computer parts on carpet all the time, but I know what I'm doing! and the parts are used and old, so if we break something, no biggie. :)

Here is a color coded picture I just made to help you and something I've been meaning to do to help others. It's nothing fancy but it will get the job done. I hope it helps you a lot. I believe the main RAM slots are the blue slots, but check your motherboard manual to make sure. Its either the blue ones, or the white ones. I'll be by my computer most of the night, so good luck, just ask if you don't know what to do. Refer to guides, and manuals, etc.

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Edited by Ferrari, 03 February 2010 - 07:59 PM.

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#50
Erolunai

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Excellent!
*has gathered all his parts together, along with a scewdriver, camera, all the manuals, etc.*
I'm going to read through the manuals now, and double and triple check before installing anything.
I'll be sure to use the guides and your help as much as I can :)

I'm using the foam padding that the motherboard was resting on, as well as the box for the motherboard as the base for now.

Edited by Erolunai, 03 February 2010 - 08:23 PM.

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#51
Ferrari

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I'll be sure to use the guides and your help as much as I can

No problem. It's actually pretty easy, don't make anything harder than it needs to be. When in doubt, just google it, refer to a manual/guide, and/or ask me. You'll do just fine.

For example, when I google, "how do I install a socket 1156 cpu" I get this... http://www.xtremesys...ad.php?t=235304
Or on youtube I search "how to install intel heatsink and fan" I get this install for a socket 775, which is similar...

REMEMBER: The CPU should fit down in the socket nice and easy with Zero Force. Arrows and little parts of the cpu will line up perfectly... you should NOT have to push it in or anything.

And share pictures when you get this thing done, I can't wait to see!!!

Edited by Ferrari, 03 February 2010 - 08:32 PM.

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#52
Erolunai

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Quick question, the instruction manual mentions applying a thin layer of "thermal grease" on the CPU? I have not seen any of this included with the CPU at all.
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#53
Ferrari

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Some should come on the stock heat sink and fan. Pre-applied for you. It will look something like this...

Posted Image

Edited by Ferrari, 03 February 2010 - 08:57 PM.

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#54
Erolunai

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alright...
another cautious question.
I've placed the CPU very, very carefully into the socket, and very gently lowered the metal gate surround, and now I'm trying to place the lever back into place, but it requires a little pressure - I'm really uncertain of this, as it's causing a very faint sound, I'm certain that I placed the CPU in correctly with no pressure, but this still worries me...

Do I press the lever down with the gate, or the gate first, and then the lever? Does it require a little more pressure, or have I already messed up?
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#55
Ferrari

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The "gate" comes down around the cpu. Then, you pull the lever down and THIS DOES require a little pressure. I know it's hard to do, I remember the first time I built a computer wondering and being scared to death about the very same thing.

I think the link above I gave shows how it works... there is an animated picture... http://www.xtremesys...amp;postcount=3
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#56
Erolunai

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Phew!
Alright... I think I've got it ^^;...
"scared to death" sounds about right, my mind is still thinking about all the things I could have already gotten wrong - admittedly, I was a little nervous so I slowly, carefully tried lowering both at once, which tilted the CPU up slightly - where I immediately stopped and carefully put it back up.
I don't think that damaged it at all, just moved it for a short moment...
I'm going to try installing the fan now...
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#57
Ferrari

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LOL, I just realize that may be a joke, it is a animated picture of it doing it backwards I think :) Anyway, You are doing it right. I've never dealt with a socket 1156 in person yet, so not 100% sure. All previous gates did it by the gate lowering, and then the lever coming down with pressure. Installing the cpu is probably the hardest part, everything else should be easier and less complicated.

Edited by Ferrari, 03 February 2010 - 09:10 PM.

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#58
Erolunai

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Thank goodness ^^;
Though, admittedly, I'm a little... uncertain of the instructions for installing the cooler. I have it set so that the four push pins are inside the four small holes at the corners just outside the CPU... it says to place the cooler atop the CPU, aligning the four push pins through the pin holes on the motherboard. Push down on the push pins diagonally, and you'll hear a click...
I've made an attempt, and still, this scares the heck out of me, I've tried quickly searching for information on this, but it still sounds a bit difficult... the instruction manual refers to the push pins as having "male" and "female" parts...
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#59
Ferrari

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The push pin design wasn't one of Intel's best ideas, did you look at that video I gave you the link of for the socket 775? The push pin/heatsink installation should pretty much be the same. I've always used aftermarket coolers that mount differently/better.

Here is the link to that video again... fast forward if you have too...

The male and female parts of the push pins are shown in that video and how they go together, I believe that is what you are referring to. Also, push down on all 4 pins at once... just like he does.
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#60
Erolunai

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using (VERY helpful, a solid, up-close demonstration of the proper pressure applied... very nice) I managed to get it in, though I accidentally turned the tabs, I had to return them to their original position.
Though, I didn't push down on all four at once, admittedly...
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