Jump to content

Welcome to Geeks to Go - Register now for FREE

Geeks To Go is a helpful hub, where thousands of volunteer geeks quickly serve friendly answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts. Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more.

Create Account How it Works
Photo

Problem with geforce go 7900 gs card


  • Please log in to reply

#16
Mikuul

Mikuul

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 11 posts
I was able to successfully boot up puppy linux using the xvesa option, when I tried xorg all I was shown were 2 large images of the "DELL" logo on a screen full of broken green lines and distorted color. Using xorg I was taken to a desktop sort of display, but there was a constant overlay of broken green lines on the screen. I was however able to scroll through documents normally, without the odd delays I'm seeing when I try scrolling in Windows. Not sure what to make of this, thoughts?

Edited by Mikuul, 02 February 2010 - 12:08 AM.

  • 0

Advertisements


#17
rshaffer61

rshaffer61

    Moderator

  • Moderator
  • 34,114 posts
Xorg is the advanced settings for Linux which allows for the higher resolutions.
Xvesa is the basic and has a very limited range of resolutions. In fact it can't do 256 colors in most cases.
Since Linux uses a chipset driver and not a model dependent driver it shows me that the problem is with the video card since it won't even use the Xorg nvidia chipset driver.
In other words Linux doesn't care it's a 7900 series...it sees a Nvidia chipset and uses that. Yours isn't doing that. It's using a basic vga video chipset and that is why I am saying the problem is the card and not the drivers.
  • 0

#18
Mikuul

Mikuul

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 11 posts
Understood, seems to confirm my fear that the card is done for. Do you have any idea where replacement cards are sold? DELL wants $500.00 to repair the machine, but for that I could get a whole new laptop.
  • 0

#19
rshaffer61

rshaffer61

    Moderator

  • Moderator
  • 34,114 posts
Yeah the problem with laptops is it is not that easy to replace a video chip. The system has to be completely taken apart and the chip has to be unsoldered from the board. A new chip is the soldered on.
I apologize I thought we were working on a desktop since you mentioned you bought the card a few years back.
Am I wrong or did you mention that somewhere because I can't find that.
  • 0

#20
Mikuul

Mikuul

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 11 posts
Sorry, the chip is in fact inside of a laptop (which I've had for 4 years), a DELL inspiron 9400 - I've only mentioned that it was an inspiron 9400 in passing, and never specified it was a laptop. Does this change the troubleshooting procedure in anyway? My reading seems to suggest that this particular model of laptop has been designed to allow users to swap out graphics cards, but finding them at a reasonable price is a challenge. The best my search turned up was one for $350.00.
  • 0

#21
rshaffer61

rshaffer61

    Moderator

  • Moderator
  • 34,114 posts
Well as i pointed out it isn't the easiest thing to do. I have never seen a card per say in a laptop for graphics. It's always been built on the motherboard.
  • 0






Similar Topics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

As Featured On:

Microsoft Yahoo BBC MSN PC Magazine Washington Post HP