Jump to content

Welcome to Geeks to Go - Register now for FREE

Geeks To Go is a helpful hub, where thousands of volunteer geeks quickly serve friendly answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts. Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more.

Create Account How it Works
Photo

mobo, psu or a short?


  • Please log in to reply

#1
aaomacman

aaomacman

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 10 posts
I'm having real annoying problems putting my new computer together.. when i try to start it things just spin and stop. now I've used the stand offs properly, (unless i can manage to screw up screwing them in, and then screwing the mobo to them), i've tested the mobo with and without my GPU and memory on it, and I've even returned the mobo as well as the psu for replacements once already. I've tried using a screw driver to boot it, and it just goes out after a second. WHAT is going on? how is it shorting? i don't understand what could of gone awry, I've done this before, and it has just worked before, this build has been nothing but one frustrating set back after another.
  • 0

Advertisements


#2
Ferrari

Ferrari

    PC SURGEON

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,939 posts
Hi aaomacman,

Can you send me some links to your system's parts? I need to confirm compatibility.

Try this in the meantime, hook up the very basics:
  • Remove the motherboard from the case and place it on a piece of cardboard
  • Install only the CPU with heatsink and fan (remember to use thermal paste and plug in the fan)
  • Install only 1 stick of ram in dimm 1 (consult your motherboard manual for which slot is to be used)
  • Hook up the Power Supply (there should be a 20 or 24pin connector, and a 4 or 8pin connector)
  • Use onboard video, (if not available, use a video card)
  • Use any momentary case switch, or have your case close enough to install it's case switch
  • Make sure there is a case speaker connected, many modern motherboards have a onboard speaker
  • Connect a ps2 mouse and keyboard along with the monitor
  • Power the system on
DO NOT hook up the hard drive, CD/DVD, case fans, lights, or anything else not mentioned above.

If the system does not power on, replace the 1 stick of RAM with the other stick. Are you getting any kind of beep codes? Do you get any video? Can you get to the BIOS? (Consult motherboard manual on how to enter the BIOS for your motherboard) Do the fans remain on, but no video?

Let me know how it goes, good luck :)
  • 0

#3
aaomacman

aaomacman

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 10 posts
Well here are the links

PSU
http://www.newegg.co...N82E16817176002

Case (not very relevant i know)
http://www.newegg.co...N82E16811119216

GPU
http://www.newegg.co...N82E16814102864

Motherboard
http://www.newegg.co...N82E16813131404

Memory
http://www.newegg.co...N82E16820231282

CPU
http://www.newegg.co...N82E16819115214

i guess i grabbed the gpu and mobo before the major complaints came in.. I have been sitting on this hardware for some time, waiting for replacements of other parts etc. I always check the low ratings of items so i know what to expect, either i failed terribly this time, or purchased products that had few reviews at the time.

Hopefully that isn't the issue, and with your advice, i can find some answers.

Edited by aaomacman, 11 February 2010 - 11:41 AM.

  • 0

#4
wannabe1

wannabe1

    Tech Staff

  • Technician
  • 16,645 posts
Hello aaomacman...

The two most common causes for the problem you describe are a short between the motherboard/chassis, or using a processor not supported by the motherboard's BIOS version.

Asus boards typically incorporate a 9 point mounting system. Check your stand-offs and make sure only 9 are installed in the case and that they all line up with the motherboard's mounting holes. Ferrari's suggestion for assembling the components outside the case is a very good way to determine if there is a short between the mobo and case.

If your Asus board's BIOS version does not support the processor (which does not appear to be the case here), you might check the Asus site to see if there is a BIOS update available. Flashing the BIOS on Asus boards is usually pretty simple using the software built into the board.

My money's on a short to the chassis...

wannabe1
  • 0

#5
Ferrari

Ferrari

    PC SURGEON

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,939 posts
Well I think I may have found your problem. The memory you linked to is DDR3 2000, your board supports 1066, 1333, 1600, and 2200* 2200 being overclocked I believe. If you look at the board on ASUS' website HERE and click on the "specifications" tab, you will see what I just told you in the memory column. Newegg's specifications say the same thing.

I believe you may be able to get the memory you currently have to work with some overclocking. I don't ever overclock, so that isn't really my expertise. DDR3 1600 will work for sure.
  • 0

#6
aaomacman

aaomacman

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 10 posts
so the memory incompatibility will cause this? i would of figured it would start the computer at least, and then just not work.. i can't even get the fans and the beeps.. at least with my case as is. that being said, i did only use 9 stand-offs, and they are lined up for the ATX form factor, which is what makes this issue of a possible short so confusing..
  • 0

#7
rshaffer61

rshaffer61

    Moderator

  • Moderator
  • 34,114 posts
Bench test the mobo outside of the case by doing the following. My Asus Formula III has 10 standoffs so check again.


The goal here is just to test the mobo:

If the computer will not boot up the please remove the motherboard from the computer along with the power supply

place the motherboard on a piece of card board larger than the motherboard,

this will eliminate a short from the mobo to the case which could be a possibility
Install the cpu with, 1 stick ram in dimm 1, power supply, case switch and case speaker
Connect ps2 mouse and keyboard along with the monitor
Power on
If the computer now boots into bios you most likely had a case short so make sure when installing the motherboard in the case that you use standoffs,
and they line up with the mounting holes in the motherboard and none of the standoffs touch anything else on the underside of the board.


Thanks to Cbarnard for these instructions
  • 0

#8
Ferrari

Ferrari

    PC SURGEON

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,939 posts

so the memory incompatibility will cause this?

Yes, if memory is incompatible, the machine won't boot.

i can't even get the fans and the beeps..

Nothing will happen if the RAM is incompatible, in your situation, the RAM is clocked higher than the board is set to by default, so when you try to power on it's like you have overclocked something... which is the first thing you check when overclocking "Does the computer power on". When overclocker's are trying different settings and speeds... often the computer will not power on because they don't have the voltage, etc... set correctly.

In short, it's like the RAM is compatible, but when the machine goes to fire up... it's say "Oh No, Wrong settings" and then turns off immediately.

Also, have you tried the "bench test" that I and rshaffer61 have suggested? Do everything it says, but try it with NO RAM. This should give you a beep code as long as the motherboard and/or cpu are good.
  • 0

#9
aaomacman

aaomacman

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 10 posts
i haven't been able to do that test yet, I've been somewhat preoccupied with classes, but i was wondering if a USB mouse and keyboard would work? i don't have those older connector types with any of my keyboards.
  • 0

#10
Ferrari

Ferrari

    PC SURGEON

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,939 posts
USB keyboard will be alright... I've done it many times. PS/2 is just the bare minimum and best for the test.

Also, I've done more reading, and it looks like that memory supposedly will work with an XMP profile, but you set that in the BIOS which you can't get to yet. I don't know, I just get the feeling that the RAM isn't liking that board for some reason. I wish you had some lower DDR3 1333, or 1600 you could try to rule that out.

Remember to try the test without installing any memory as well. Just try to get some sort of beep code, video, or any action in all the tests we've mentioned.

Also, the RAM at that high of speed (i.e. 2000mhz) is supposed to be used in the "Hyper DIMMs" according to ASUS's website, so you can try another test with using 1 stick in the blue color, and 1 stick on the black color slots... consult your motherboard manual to see which slot is the 1st slot for each channel. Here is a quote from their website.

4 x DIMM, Max. 16 GB, DDR3 2200(O.C.)*/1600/1333/1066 Non-ECC,Un-buffered Memory
Dual Channel memory architecture
Supports Intel® Extreme Memory Profile (XMP)
*Hyper DIMM support is subject to the physical characteristics of individual CPUs. Some hyper DIMMs only support one DIMM per channel. Please refer to Memory QVL for details.
**Refer to www.asus.com or this user manual for the Memory QVL(Qualified Vendors Lists).


  • 0

Advertisements


#11
aaomacman

aaomacman

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 10 posts
So based on the assumption that memory was the issue, i booted the benchmark mode computer with no memory first, and got 3 quick beeps in a row repeatedly, so apparently it wanted memory. i tried both sticks, and they both started it up into bios, but when i tried them together and i went into the bios menu of system info it says i have a usable memory size of 2040.. but i have 4 gigs.

so this seems to lead me to the conclusion that i can't install motherboards properly and it is grounding somewhere, but also begs the question of why this memory that isn't supposed to be supported seems to work(kind of).

the worst part is i seriously can't understand why its shorting, there are clearly nine holes for mounting the mobo to the case, you can even look at the pictures in the link i supplied, click on the picture of the backside, and you see cpu fan mount holes, and the traditional mounting for atx.

anyways, now that we've established this, there are a few more problems i face, A. why my computer is shorting and B. how the memory is working and why its only 2040mb according to the bios.
  • 0

#12
Ferrari

Ferrari

    PC SURGEON

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,939 posts

but also begs the question of why this memory that isn't supposed to be supported seems to work(kind of).

I think I was misleading/plain wrong. The memory will work with your board, but you have to use the Hyper DIMMS for it to run at the full 2000mhz, and maybe an XMP profile of sorts.

Did you try putting one stick in a blue slot and one stick in a black slot? For each color, use the 1st slot. (The Hyper DIMMS)
When you use one stick at a time, does it register the full 2gb each time?
I wonder if you need to change to a XMP profile in the BIOS somewhere in the memory section. This is more related to the speed of the RAM, but just a thought.

why my computer is shorting

It may not be related to the stand-offs. Was there a loose screw in the case? Are you 100% sure you had everything hooked up correctly? Case design flaw? Etc. Etc. I would recommend that you put the bare minimum back in the case, and try again. Now you know for sure that everything does in fact work.
  • 0

#13
aaomacman

aaomacman

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 10 posts
ok i repositioned the memory.. i accidentally did one blue, one black, but on the other side, now that im doing blue and blue, it says 4088. i didn't see anything in the case that looked like it would produce a short..Posted Image

Posted Image

i don't think its bent, and i used the proper holes that the case said, and it matches with the mobos holes
  • 0

#14
Ferrari

Ferrari

    PC SURGEON

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,939 posts

I would recommend that you put the bare minimum back in the case, and try again. Now you know for sure that everything does in fact work.

But only hook up the bare minimum, no hdd led, or reset switch, no cd/dvd, no extra fans, hook up everything the same way you just did out side of the case. If the system powers on(gets to the BIOS), then you can start connecting ONLY ONE thing at a time, i.e. reset switch, and then power on. Repeat this for every thing you plug in, one at a time. Do you see what I'm getting at? This will find the culprit, if any, that is causing the system to not boot.

If the system still doesn't power on with just the bare minimum hooked up like you have now, then there is a short somewhere. Where? I don't know! :)

EDIT: It may have been the Memory all along, not sure at this point. I can't remember how you first had the memory hooked up, and I'm a little busy.

Edited by Ferrari, 12 February 2010 - 02:29 PM.

  • 0

#15
aaomacman

aaomacman

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 10 posts
i found out it was my HD, it was from my last system, i assumed it worked. you know what they say about assuming.

anyways, i want to thank all of you for the fantastic support! I've never seen such enthusiastic help on an online forum and i am lucky to find such a great community :)
  • 0






Similar Topics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

As Featured On:

Microsoft Yahoo BBC MSN PC Magazine Washington Post HP