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What are these numbers, and where can I look them up


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#1
Surlyrider

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Greetings,

Don't know what the proper term for these numbers is:
609F7AC8-C510-11D4-A788-009027ABA5D0
0AF9B2CE-3610-11D4-A788-009027ABA5D0.

These were seen in the properties of an event viewer warning.

I know they identify a product or software package, but I'd like to be able to use the correct terminology.

Main question- is there a database somewhere I can search to identify what they refer to?

Thanks,
SR
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#2
Broni

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    Kraków my love :)

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Those are CLSID (class identifier)numbers.

http://www.fileresea...html?term=CLSID

What is a CLSID?
A Class ID (CLSID) is a 128 bit (large) number that represents a unique id for a software application or application component. Typically they are displayed like this "{AE7AB96B-FF5E-4dce-801E-14DF2C4CD681}".

You can think of a CLSID as a "social security number" for a piece of software, or a software component.

What are they used for?
CLSIDs are used by Windows to identify software components without having to know their "name". They can also be used by software applications to identify a computer, file or other item.

Where do they come from?
Microsoft provides a utility (program) called GUIDGEN.EXE that generates these numbers. They are generated by using the current time, network adapter address (if present) and other items in your computer so that no two numbers will ever be the same.


You can identify many of them here: http://www.systemlookup.com/

If you can't find them at the above link, simply Google them.

For instance, {0AF9B2CE-3610-11D4-A788-009027ABA5D0} seems to belong to DirectCD/Roxio "DragToDisc" feature.
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#3
Surlyrider

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Broni,

Thanks, that's what I was after!
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#4
Broni

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    Kraków my love :)

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You're welcome :)
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#5
Surlyrider

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I'm back...

After reading up on the CLSIDs, it appears they are generated uniquely on the machine, based on time and components unique to that machine. If that's the case, then I would expect the same product installed on two different machines to have two different CLSIDs? If that's the case, how can there be a database or list of them anywhere other than in the registry of the machine that created them?
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#6
Broni

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it appears they are generated uniquely on the machine, based on time and components unique to that machine

No. They are unique for particular program, or its component, not a computer.
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