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MOBO, processor, GPU, & RAM upgrade combo


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#1
AdgeT

AdgeT

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Okay, so my computer is getting on 8 years old now, but because it was top of the line in its day, it still runs well. Long story short, I'm looking for help and info on upgrading my RDRAM.

Currently, I have a D850EMV2 motherboard, a Pentium 4 processor, and 2 sets of paired RDRAM sticks (all four sticks are 256MB, Kingston ValueRAM model KVR1066X16-8/256). I've been to Crucial.com and scanned my system and entered the known information, which led me to the info that the max RAM my system can handle is 2GB. Basically, what I'd like to try to do is just buy 1GB PC800 RDRAM and replace one of the 256MB (1066 MHz) sticks with it, thus giving me approx 1.76GB of RAM total. To the questions of whether I need to install in matching pairs, Crucial says, "No, you can install modules one at a time, and you can mix different densities of modules in your computer. But if your computer supports dual-channel memory configurations, you should install in identical pairs (preferably in kits) for optimal performance." I'm lost on the dual-channel thing.

So will my idea work? Or am I going to have to buy 2 x 1GB PC800 sticks or 4 x 512MB PC800 sticks for everything to work right?

Also, I read something about 45ns vs. 40ns internal timing when it comes to RDRAM, but I'm not sure what that refers to and can't find a reference to it on my current RDRAM or the RDRAM I'm thinking about purchasing.


EDIT: Just came across this link . It offers info on compatibility, and it appears that I have to install RAM in pairs, but I'm still a bit confused. Could I install two 512MB sticks and keep two of my 256MB sticks? Given similar prices for 512MB and 1GB, wouldn't it be best to get two 1GB sticks? (RDRAM is expensive!) If I do go with two 1GB sticks, would I install them one in each set of slots (|X - |X), or both in one set of slots (|| - XX), where | represents a RAM stick and X represents a continuity placeholder? I'm not even sure I still have my RAM module continuity placeholders, though.

In addition, I don't really understand the 400MHz FSB vs 533MHz Front Side Bus issue.

Any help with all of this would be much appreciated.

Edited by AdgeT, 25 February 2010 - 12:33 PM.

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#2
Neil Jones

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RDRAM aka RIMM memory has to be installed in pairs and what memory modules on the board you don't fill with memory you need to fill with the placeholders. You will have them otherwise the machine wouldn't work.

According to Intel's site that board isn't listed as supported 1Gb sticks so the most you could probably put in it will be 4x512Mb, however since machines that are running RIMM memory are, with all due respect, old and slow now and it may be a wiser investment to replace the entire board, memory and processor.
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#3
AdgeT

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it may be a wiser investment to replace the entire board, memory and processor.


I'm willing to do this, but will it require me to completely reinstall my OS and all programs?

Part of the reason I've been hanging on to my compy is that I dread having to buy and set up a new computer from scratch (it's also expensive). When I do upgrade, I'd like to build an entire system myself, so this MOBO, processor, memory upgrade might be a blessing in disguise. It allows me to get my hands a little dirty and stick with my old, beloved compy just a bit longer.

I don't play games on my computer, and I generally don't watch a whole lot of videos, so I don't need blazing speed, but I do some video conversion and I'd like to have a combo that might get me by at least until I've found some steady work and can afford to buy and build a new system.

Thanks for the help.

Edited by AdgeT, 24 February 2010 - 02:04 PM.

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#4
AdgeT

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Any thoughts on the following combo?

- GIGABYTE GA-P55A-UD3P LGA 1156 Intel P55 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard - Retail $160

- GIGABYTE GV-R567OC-1GI Radeon HD 5670 (Redwood) 1GB 128-bit DDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready CrossFireX Support Video Card - Retail $110

- Intel Core i5-650 Clarkdale 3.2GHz 4MB L3 Cache LGA 1156 73W Dual-Core Desktop Processor - Retail $190

- G.SKILL 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Dual Channel Kit Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL9D-4GBNQ - Retail $105
OR
- G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 4GB 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1333 (PC3 10666) Desktop Memory Model F3-10666CL9S-4GBRL - Retail $155

SUBTOTAL: $565 OR $615
MINUS: $15 for combo deal for CPU + video card
TOTAL: $550 OR $600


I'd like to have a processor and RAM that I can maybe carry over to a newer motherboard later on. Is that likely with this combo? I'm a bit concerned that the Ripjaws RAM only has one review on Newegg, but I'd rather get one 4GB module than 2x2GB which won't necessarily be as useful down the line. (I checked and 32-bit Windows XP Pro can only see 4GB of memory. I'm pretty sure I have 32-bit.)

Thanks.

Edited by AdgeT, 24 February 2010 - 02:10 PM.

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