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Memory Question


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#1
DrD

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In the case of memory, I notice these two types:

CRUCIAL MICRON 512MB 64x64 PC 2700 DDR RAM - OEM
and
KINGSTON KVR333X64C25/512 512MB 32x64 PC2700 DDR RAM

What is the difference in the 32x64 versus 64x64 ? Does it
actually equate to speed or quality ?

Any info appreciated.

DrD
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#2
admin

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I think it's a typo 32x64 and 64x64 refer to the number and size of individual memory modules. 64x64 is 512MB, 32X64 is 256MB.

If you are going to build a system using the nForce 2 motherboard you'll get the best performance from it's dual channel memory by using 2 memory sticks (i.e. 2X256MB). Also, if you're serious about overclocking you'll want to go with PC3200 RAM. When considering RAM don't forget to look at the latency (often spec'd as CAS) the lower the number the better. B) Of course, performance comes at a price.

I'm a big fan of Crucial memory. Kingston HyperX, Corsair, and Mushkin also all make very good quality memory.

edit: Here's how you can save $25 on 512MB of Crucial PC2700 memory...

Click Here and follow these instructions:
First click the above link to be redirected to a URL where it will tell you a $25 coupon is activated. Then click the "Memory Upgrades" link on the left, then find the pulldown menu in the middle "Choose Your Memory" and select DDR PC2700. You can then choose one of the 512MB PC2700 modules they have: The regular DDR PC2700 64x64 (item CT6464Z335) for $68 or the ECC DDR PC2700 64x72 (item CT6472Z335) for $82. Add one to your cart, and during the checkout process enter code NLHP25Q610 to get $25 off the purchase price. Free 2-day shipping too. So, you can get a 512MB DDR PC2700 memory module for $43 which is a very good deal.

I don't think this coupon code works with any other memory besides the 512MB PC2700 memory.

Edited by admin, 17 June 2003 - 07:11 PM.

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#3
DrD

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Wow that's a good savings - thanks a lot! I was reading some
posts that people are still overclocking ok with 2700 memory
even though its not as good as the 3200. Also, I was leaning
towards the KT400 chipset due to some issues between the
Crucial memory and the nForce2 chipset. Notice here...

Crucial Memory Ratings Info

What sounds like a good combo to me that is not too expensive
is the Epox 8K9A2 with KT400 chipset, the AMD ATHLON XP
2500+ "Barton" 333 and the Crucial Memory you just mentioned.
That would be only $85(MB) + $92(CPU) from newegg.com and
then $43 to Crucial for the memory. B) So I would lose the
advantage of the dual channel memory with the one stick, but
if I get another one later, I can re-coup the benefit, right ? I like
what I read about Epox and I picked the 8K9A2 even though most
people have the 8RDA+ because I've had good luck with the KT
chipset and the memory issues I linked above. What do you think ?
I'm I being too frugal with the memory ? I'm not a super-overclocker,
but I like to overclock some. Do you recommend an aftermarket
cooling fan for the CPU also ?

Dr D
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#4
admin

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I think you've got a great system going there!

Overclocking is all about balance. Balancing performance, vs cost, vs heat. I'm an overclocker, but I used to like to see how fast I could make my car go too (before they became all computerized ) :D

If I add up the extra money spent on high speed RAM, the fastest motherboard, expensive heatsink/fan or watercooling, power supply, etc, I could probably just have purchased the faster, more expensive hardware to begin with, had the same speed system, and avoided the pitfalls of overclocking. But, sometimes it's just all about the challenge. <_<

I think you're taking the smart approach, allowing a decent overclock without having to invest much in hardware. I'd probably start with the retail CPU that comes with a heat sink and fan. If you find you've got heat problems when overclocking, you can always add another combo later. You'd only be out about $10, plus you've got a longer warranty.
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#5
DrD

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Great thanks! I was hoping you might say something along
those lines. <_< But the one question I just wanted
to make sure.... Can I still have an advantage of dual channel
memory when using the KT400 chipset over nForce2 ?

Thanks,
Dr. D
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#6
admin

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Can I still have an advantage of dual channel
memory when using the KT400 chipset over nForce2 ?

Thanks,
Dr. D

Nope.

The KT400 has performance very similar to the nForce2 chipset, but nForce2's do have a slight advantage in dual-channel mode. This performance difference may be benchmarkable, however you'll never notice the difference in real world applications.

The biggest advantage of the nForce2 chipsets are their ability to overclock the FSB to over 220mhz!.

When building a system using the KT400 you'll probably get the best memory performance using a single large memory stick.
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