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Overclocking.


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#1
TheWhiteRose000

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Can not having thermal paste / grease, prevent the computer from over clocking?
My motherboard can support it.

But sense I don't got any grease or compound it wouldn't boot up after we tweaked the bio's.
to a safe 3.2 Ghz.

Anyone got a answer for this?
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#2
Neil Jones

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Please do not run any processor of any type without any form of thermal paste on the top of the processor.
Also do not run it without any form of active cooling, otherwise you run the risk of the processor cooking itself.

With regards to the overclockability of something, if you buy a processor there is no guarantee you will be able to overclock it. Due to the way processors and silicon chips are made, a lot of them end up as effectively repackaged lower models.

The most obvious example is probably the Sempron 140, AM3 AMD processor. It is a cut-down dual-core Athlon II X2 440 processor because one of the cores on the chip sold as a 140 is defective, most likely. Therefore as AMD will not sell a faulty dual-core processor they simply disable the faulty core and sell it as a Sempron 140. This also cuts down on waste at AMD's end. Out of a total of around 1000 processors made for the top-range of that batch two thirds of them typically end up being cut-down in some way due to faults that occur in the manufacturing process. It is much better to sell them in some form rather than throw them in the bin. Some will end up being scrapped.

So to cut a long story short: Just because your board will overclock doesn't mean the processor will. You have no way of knowing whether your processor will overclock until you try it. This applies to AMD and Intel processors.

Edited by Neil Jones, 07 March 2010 - 04:41 AM.

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#3
TheWhiteRose000

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http://www.newegg.co...N82E16819116265

how's this for Overclocking?

MOBO.

Asus P5QL Pro.
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#4
DaffyKantReed

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The E5300 or E5400 are better choices due to the higher multiplier.
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#5
happyrock

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http://www.newegg.co...N82E16819116265

how's this for Overclocking?

MOBO.

Asus P5QL Pro.

that is a Celeron processor...the lowest end of intel processors ...
if your interested in OCing then go to the guide here

to check any mobo's potential to see how it does just google it using this format....mobo make and model number + benchmarking ...should look like this...
GA-EX58-EXTREME + benchmarking
then click on a few of the results in google to see how the board does...do the same for any CPU to see how it overclocks...you may not be able to OC a mobo or CPU as far as the reviewers do because all processors and mobo's are a crapshoot on what you get...some OC better than others...it comes down to luck of the draw...

Edited by happyrock, 09 March 2010 - 11:01 AM.

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#6
TheWhiteRose000

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was at class tonight and was working on my desktop.
Got it up to 3.41 with no issue's.

3.5 Cause's the degree's to go up to 150 Farenheight, so I lowered it to 3.41
Did 3.61 but it BSOD.

Probably do to the fact it can really only go up to 3.59 even though it says it can do 3.6 there is no way to configure it to be dead on like that.


xD
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#7
Troy

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if your interested in OCing then go to the guide here

:)

That guide is from 1997! It was a good read down memory lane...
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#8
TheWhiteRose000

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I got my board OC'd but I wish I understood the mathmatic's about it.

I keep seeing new terms I've never seen before.
Or finding out what they mean or how to find them

Like "benchmarking"
Finding out your Multiplier.

Ect.
DX
Backside Bus?


I know what a FBS is, and what its speed is.
But how do I figure it all out.


For me the equation after 30-40 mins of messing with the mobo was.
.5 for every .1 hert.


Which was about 286.
If memory serves me right
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