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Dual Booting MS 7 and Ubuntu Linux


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#1
FNP

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After using Ubuntu's WUBI installer to install Linux directly on my Windows 7 platform, I decided that I wanted to take advantage of my dual-partitioned hard drive (WUBI obviously is a dual-boot solution, but I wanted to separate my file systems).

Everything went normally in the beginning. After formatting my D: partition, I installed Ubuntu on half my hard drive. Of course, Ubuntu Linux uses GRUB to boot. Unfortunately, GRUB seemed to override Window's boot sequence, and instead of the dual-boot screen I got when using WUBI, it automatically took me to Ubuntu without presenting a choice of OS.

I uninstalled Linux (all my data was still on the now-defunct Windows), and after some research, found out how to uninstall GRUB by repairing the Master Boot Record using my Windows Recovery CD. All is well with Windows now.

My question is, how do I set my boot-sequence to give me an option to dual-boot, rather than have GRUB directly boot Linux?

Thanks in advance! :)
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#2
silverbeard

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From my experience Ubuntu's installer usually detects other OSes and adds them to the GRUB boot loader. Since you've repaired the MBR you may be able to reinstall Ubuntu and get it to find Windows when it installs grub. Be sure to remove Wubi from windows.

The Ubuntu forums have a good write up on GRUB 2 Basics.
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#3
DaffyKantReed

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@FNP

I've had the same thing happen to me twice during the past three weeks. Once using Ubuntu 9.10 and once with Debian Testing 64-bit. In both cases Grub 1.97 beta4 (Grub2) did not detect my Windows 7 or XP partition.

The fix was to run 'update-grub' as root, only after running 'aptitude safe-upgrade' or 'aptitude full-upgrade'.
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#4
FNP

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silverbeard-

Thanks for the link! In my situation, GRUB didn't recognize my 7 partition- it booted straight into Ubuntu. Weird. But I think I found an answer in the Ubuntu forums. :) And yes, I had uninstalled WUBI previous to all this (I had used it with my Vista, which I overwrote with 7).

DaffyKantReed-

I assume those are commands I can run from inside the terminal, yes?
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#5
silverbeard

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I haven't used Ubuntu for a while 'cause I just don't like it. I have just had to much trouble getting it to behave the way I like, to many years using KDE I guess.

A good rule of thumb after install run the package manager to make sure it's up to date. Then try the command line if Window isn't there.

In Ubuntu all command line arguments that will do something to the system level have to be preceded by "sudo".


sudo update-grub
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#6
FNP

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Haha, yeah. I haven't tried using a KDE build. Would you recommend it over a Ubuntu (or similar) build?

And thanks for the reminder on sudo arguments in the terminal. I appreciate it! :)
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#7
DaffyKantReed

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DaffyKantReed-
I assume those are commands I can run from inside the terminal, yes?


Correct.

http://www.geekstogo...s...t&p=1780556
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#8
silverbeard

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For me KDE is more tweakable than Gnome. For some this can be a down side because of the many options. This can make KDE a headache for people who like their decisions made for them as to how their desktop should act. I've seen some nice Gnome implementations like in Linux Mint and Zorin ( I use Linux Mint on my laptop). I'm just so use to how to find and tweak my interface in KDE that I prefer it. Old habits die hard. Mostly I'm still using KDE 3.5.x but have been been playing with KDE 4.x for a while and it works well. It's just a matter of personal preference. SimplyMepis is my distro of choice. Being Debian Lenny based it's stable and just works. The current 8.5 is in release candidate 2. One of the better KDE 4 distros I've tried but not for the weak of heart as it's still testing and has some bugs to be fixed.
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